Stoves

rapidboy

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jun 14, 2004
2,535
25
BB
I've used a Trangia 25 for about 7 years and have just changed to a 27 to reduce the weight and bulk in my pack.
I use the clear mineralised methylated spirit's and it burns much cleaner than the purple stuff.
Anyone used the trangia pots/kettle on an open fire ? ,i haven't tried it in case they get damaged.
RB
 

gb

Full Member
Nov 4, 2003
134
0
Cornwall
i use my trangia kettle on the fire and it seems fine, just make sure you take the rubber on the hanger off, if its got some on.

cheers gb
 

stevec

Full Member
Oct 30, 2003
406
52
Sheffield
can't remember if i've posted on this or not. I use a pocket rocket for a swift brew on the hill, but it does have a small burner which renders it not so good for cooking proper meals. for that i either use a coleman alpine, or a whisperlite 600 int.
but its all down to choice. most people dump the red triangular case for the rocket, but i use mine, a mini bic fits in quite well so you always know where a lighter is.
steve
 

Mikey P

Full Member
Nov 22, 2003
2,252
6
49
Glasgow, Scotland
I had a Trangia when I was in the Scouts about 20 years ago - God only knows what happened to that as I can't find it anywhere now.

Currently use a hexi for day hikes and MSR XGK Shakerjet for anything longer. The XGK is the dog's dangleys as it can run on diesel, which is what we fuel most of our wagons with. Bit smelly and dirty but it works. Have found that you do have to strip and clean the stove after heav usage but, hey, you've got to look after your kit, anyway.
 

Adi007

New Member
Sep 3, 2003
4,080
0
Mikey P said:
The XGK is the dog's dangleys as it can run on diesel, which is what we fuel most of our wagons with. Bit smelly and dirty but it works.
Just remember to change jets before going from diesel to petrol!
 

Martyn

New Member
Aug 7, 2003
5,252
31
54
staffordshire
www.britishblades.com
Well, was out looking for a new pair of boots today and came back with a trangia 27 duolsol. :lol:

My main gripe with trangia's is the lack of control over the meths burner (as well as lack of power), but this is mainly based on reviews as I havent owned a meths burner before, oh and crappy aluminium pans - I hate aluminium. I think the price of the trangia kits put me off experimenting with one. I guess now I will. I got this one because it was on offer at £45 (shop soiled, but fine). The stainless pans are tons heavier duty than the aluminium ones, and tons heavier - period! I think worth it though. As regards the meths burner - well, I have a little something up my sleave to turn this sedate cook set into the gourmet equivalent of a McLarenF1 - watch this space. :lol: :lol:
 

Douglas

New Member
Jun 14, 2004
79
0
30
Switzerland
Martyn said:
As regards the meths burner - well, I have a little something up my sleave to turn this sedate cook set into the gourmet equivalent of a McLarenF1 - watch this space. :lol: :lol:
You've already told us what that is :wink:

Can anybody comment on the size of the Trangia 27's pots? Are they big enough for most cooking needs?
 

leon-1

Mod
Mod
Douglas the pots on the Trangia 27 are a very good size for an individual to use. I have still got one, after 15 years it is still going strong and I have no complaints, although I do experiment with other stoves as well.

Trangias are always at their best when the weather is at its worst :-D
 

Douglas

New Member
Jun 14, 2004
79
0
30
Switzerland
Nice! Makes me hungry :p

Do you get a lot of those big yellow flames with the Nova? I get them everytime with my Coleman Peak 1 and would be weary of using it inside a tent or under anything....how's the Nova from that point of vue?

And is the stability gain worth the weight? (rather than just using the normal feet and pots)

Thanks Leon-1 :-D
 

Martyn

New Member
Aug 7, 2003
5,252
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staffordshire
www.britishblades.com
Douglas said:
Nice! Makes me hungry :p

Do you get a lot of those big yellow flames with the Nova? I get them everytime with my Coleman Peak 1 and would be weary of using it inside a tent or under anything....how's the Nova from that point of vue?

And is the stability gain worth the weight? (rather than just using the normal feet and pots)

Thanks Leon-1 :-D
The only time I see big yellow flames is when I'm priming it - I think everyone gets yellow flames then with any type of petrol stove that needs priming. But aside from the 30 seconds or so it takes to prime, I've never had any kind of flare-up. Once the stove is hot, the flames are always blue. But I wouldn't like to prime it inside a tent - I do have enough confidence in the stove to move it under a fly when primed though.

The trangia conversion is awesome. I can put the ordinary "spider legs" back onto the nova at any time, but I dont think I'll be in a hurry. The converted nova fits nicely inside the trangia as a kit, the trangia provides a brill windshield, very stable cooking platform and a nice, compact unit. I doubt it'll get much use if I have to lug my gear for miles (unless I'm going for a long period, which makes petrol stoves a more efficient option), but if the car is close at hand, it'll be number 1 choice for sure. In fact I think it'll probably be living in the boot of my car from now on. It's basically a very powerful, very controlable, very versatile, very stable, efficient, stormproof, take anywhere, self contained cook set. But, ...a little on the heavy side, not unbearably so, just a bit OTT for overnighters and the like.

The neat thing is I now get to play with the meths burner - I'm actually quite impressed. more than I thought I would be. Obviously in terms of raw power and controlability, it doesnt touch the nova, but I'm surprised at what a very capable little bit of kit it is. I'm having fun at the moment, thinking of how I can get a trangia meths burner, home made windshield, home made pot stand, pot handle, spoon, a small stainless pot and a mug all inside a 12cm Zebra billy can.
 

RovingArcher

Need to contact Admin...
Jun 27, 2004
1,069
1
Monterey Peninsula, Ca., USA
In an effort to keep my gear as lite weight and simple as I can, I went away from the more proficient stoves and went with an Esbit w/solid fuel. Most of my outings I'll take some parched corn/buffalo trail food, oatmeal, soup, seasonings, cocoa, tea and coffee, but for the most part, I eat what I find in the bush, which lessens the load considerably. It's amazing just how proficient a man can become with his food gathering when he's really hungry. :lol:
 

Gary

New Member
Apr 17, 2003
2,603
0
53
from Essex
Martyn as impressed as I am with your handy work I have to ask WHY?

Why fit it when it wasnt broken?

Sorry I'm at a lost here.

I'm with you Roving Archer, I have been testing green heat gel (not the cookers but the sachets - which I give the thumbs up and will soon be stocking) and using these with a US 1 Quart canteen cup and stand, with one sachet of fuel you can easily bring it to the boil - the fuel is also a good emergency tinder but unlike hexi theres no residue and its safe to use indoors.

This set up and a few sachets of soup have formed the bases of some interesting bush snacks just lately.
 

Martyn

New Member
Aug 7, 2003
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Gary said:
Martyn as impressed as I am with your handy work I have to ask WHY?

Why fit it when it wasnt broken?

Sorry I'm at a lost here.
That's a good question Gary.

I guess it boils down (no pun intended) to how I use the nova. Or rather, how I dont use it. Let me explain. I dont really do much that needs a high end multifuel stove - virtually nothing in fact. No moutain treks or high altitude stuff, no hymalaian expeditions where fuel is scarce and varied. I even thought of selling it because my cheap little gas stove covers just about everything I do. I bought the nova on impulse aftyer reading a rave review (I must stop doing that, it's getting expensive), but I dont really have a need for it. On the other hand, on the few occasions I've used it, I've loved it. Same thing with the trangia, I dont really need one. My little gas stove is fine. But again, it's how I intend to use it. By that I mean I doubt the trangia will see any service in my occasional overnights, or (more usual) day trips. It's too big and too heavy. But, again, it's one of those stoves that will live in my car and go with me on longer (albeit far more rare) trips. To be honest, If I didnt own the nova, I wouldn't of bought the trangia. I really do like the versatility, power and convenience of the nova as a standalone stove, but it was pretty much relegated to the car anyway. So I thought, why not go the whole hog and make it into an uber-stove, purely for car-camping and the rare longer trips (hoping to do a biggie next year for my 40th - up north ;) ). So really, what I'm trying to say is that the trangia was an extension of the nova, rather than the other way round. I wasnt trying to fix or improve the trangia, but trying to build on the nova - does that make sense?

Besides, this is all about fun right? I actually derive a great deal of pleasure from experimenting & playing with all the stuff. I'm not a total gear junkie, but I do like to try things out - even if I end up going back to basic and simple, It's a journey I like to take for myself rather than rely on a third party.

Perhaps the question should be "why not?"
 

Adi007

New Member
Sep 3, 2003
4,080
0
Martyn said:
Besides, this is all about fun right? I actually derive a great deal of pleasure from experimenting & playing with all the stuff. I'm not a total gear junkie, but I do like to try things out - even if I end up going back to basic and simple, It's a journey I like to take for myself rather than rely on a third party.

Perhaps the question should be "why not?"
Absolutely! There a great deal of fun and satisfaction to be had from experimenting and getting things the way you want them! :-D
 

Gary

New Member
Apr 17, 2003
2,603
0
53
from Essex
Fair enough Martyn - whatever makes your stick float.

As I say impressed with your handy work none the less.