Stoves

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Ed

Admin
Admin
Aug 27, 2003
5,925
18
46
South Wales Valleys
tran-ger 27 brill piece of kit
A bit bulky for my tastes now, but I have to agree. I took one with me when I lived in asia. In india they have a local 'hootch' called arak, which is sold in sealed plastic bags!!! you put a straw in and drink..... Made brilliant trangia fuel though ..... and dirt cheap.... about 16p a litre.....

:)
Ed
 

Ed

Admin
Admin
Aug 27, 2003
5,925
18
46
South Wales Valleys
You've tried it then ;-) It did corrode.... I wasn't sure if was the arak or if it was the 100% humidity during the monsoon.....

Ed
 

Ed

Admin
Admin
Aug 27, 2003
5,925
18
46
South Wales Valleys
Tried it as in couldn't breathe for 5 minutes yes!!!!
I wasn't that brave (or silly depending on how you look at it).... I saw what it did to paint ..... the family I stayed with used it as an all-purpose cleaner .... and karen found it an excellent nail varnish remover..... good fuel aswell...

:)
Ed
 

GATOR

New Member
Dec 24, 2003
37
0
SW Florida, USA
Here's what I use most of the time.



Easy, simple, quick, cost less than $20 USD. No priming, pumping, or fuel filters. I've used it in all sorts of enviornments including in the snow at elevation. The Primus Iso/Pro fuel worked just fine even if it did sputter a little in the mornings after staying on the ice all night.

Whatever I try, I just can't seem to warm up to the HEET stoves. :cry:
 

ChrisKavanaugh

Need to contact Admin...
Has anyone translated your kits into urban emergency gear? During the Northridge earthquake My Coleman 2 burner campstove did yoeman duty at my grandmother's damaged home. I avoid cartridge fuel systems because of the recycling issue. My normal carry starts with a pocket Esbit for quick brew ups. You can improve the draft by snipping additional screens from a soda can. I've owned many of the units allready mentioned. They all have some drawback, but when it's pouring rain I DON'T CARE if that magical blue-yellow dancer does her choreography. Has anyone used cast iron ware? I have several 'Dutch Ovens' which were first imported from England to the so called Pennsylvania Dutch ( really german immigrants.) This troublesome rebel metalsmith named Paul Revere added a lip to the lid to hold the coals and the tripod legs. Not excactly rucksack candidates, but ironware offers a fascinating alternative in base camps with slow even cook times and expanded menues.
 
S

Strider

Guest
never had Arak, but whilst in Ecuador I subjected myself to Aqua-Diente...fire water. Made from fermented sugar cane, its got this sickly sweet smell, however all I could taste was burning. It was at the last supper after our expedition up and around Cotopaxi had been completed, and we asked our guides what the local brews were and we were directed to the afore mentioned. When we asked for some at the bar(in poor Spanish) we were laughed at and given what turned out to be straight scotch. Two stotches later, we went to the bar with a guide and eventually got the real macoy... the barman reached under the sink and held aloft an old plastic milk carton-you know thats quality-from which we were served. Its given as 'courage' ( more like some sort of aenesthetic!) to the bullfighters before a show, and it is violent stuff. The guy then proceeded to challenge us to drink as many as we could, pouring more out as soon as we had finished the previous shot - It was free!! :roll: I dont remember much of that night except for breaking the hotel lift and apparently asking for a wake-up call to my room 6 or 7 times :-? - It was a celebratory occasion..and we celebrated alot :wink:

Back on topic... I really like the look of the MSR pocket rocket, how would anyone compare it to the micron stove by primus??
 

Stuart

Full Member
Sep 12, 2003
4,141
43
**********************
I have the pocket rocket and it is very good i have used it extensivly abroad hooked up to blowtorch canisters (same thread as cooking canisters :wink: )

I have not used the primus one but having looked at it i would buy the primus one if i had to choose

same weight but slightly more compact and has an igniter
 

JimFSC

Full Member
Mar 21, 2004
89
0
Isle of Wight
I must say whenever possible I cook on an open fire- and even use the folding woodstove if necessary (about 15 quid from survival school) but recently had to buy some pots and pans for my new flat (after checking round various kitchenware departments went to blacks and bought MSR Titanium pots (you know when youre obsessed with bushcraft when....) and threw in a MSR Windpro which though expensive is tiny and boils 1 litre in about 4 minutes! Fantastic so far, but I will still rely on a backup hexy stove of course.
Blue Sky, Jim. :-D
 

alick

Settler
Aug 29, 2003
632
0
Northwich, Cheshire
rocket v micron
I don't think there's much in it. I bought the rocket - it's simple and very well machined. I think the micron was more expensive at the time and the price difference didn't seem worth it. Try them if possible. The rocket definately concentrates the heat in one place so if the micro has a a diffuser this would be useful.
On stuff this small, the quality of the pan supports are important for usability. Rocket pan supports need to be sharpened to help them bite the bottom of the pan.
I also got the crux cheap by mail order from the usa - it's very good - tiny but with a big burnerhead that suits large pans for it's small size. I did bend a pan support by crushing it hard in the pack one time - the metal is very soft because of the heating it receives. Easily bent back but made me wary of anything too fragile in these ultralight designs.
 

Douglas

New Member
Jun 14, 2004
79
0
30
Switzerland
Sorry to raise the dead.

For those of you who have a Trangia 27, how do you find the pot sizes for cooking? 1l pots look really tiny, can you still cook pasta, rice and other things in them, or can you only really do food that doesn't need water?

And is Duossal worth the extra weight and cost? (Non-stick would be the other option, fragile but not a problem if you use plastic cutlery)
 

Hoodoo

Full Member
Nov 17, 2003
5,302
12
Michigan, USA
Put me in the Trangia-Esbit crowd. Esbit is ultralightweight and what I use exclusively for backpacking now. The Trangia comes in a close second. If you plan on boiling LARGE amounts of water with a stove, then I would go with one of the gas stoves.

The key to getting good efficiency out of the Trangia and Esbit, is to have a really well-made windscreen. The screen should extend up around your pot with only about a 1/4" gap all the way around. Without a good windscreen, Trangias and Esbit stoves can be pretty miserable.

This is my current esbit stove. The base is the bottom half of a round candy tin, turned over. It has a slight depression in it so when the esbit becomes liquified from heating, it doesn't roll off. The base for the candy tin is made from the lid of another tin can, slightly larger in diameter than the candy tin. I cut the lid off from the side, not from the top, so there are no sharp edges. The pot stand is made from hardware cloth. The windscreen is made from aluminum flashing used on roofs. A paper punch was used on the base to punch holes for ventilation. I have used this setup extensively and it never fails although I have not tried it in winter.