Hammock Underblankets

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EastSussexScout

Tenderfoot
Feb 27, 2010
64
0
Brighton
i am a self confessed hammockaholic and at the moment i am using a DD camping hammock and 3x3 tarp with a self inflating roll mat inbetween the layers and a 3 season sleeping bag around me. From reading through the forum here, i notice that many people use these "underblankets" and wondered about the advantages/disadvantages and what exactly i should be looking for if i buy one. any suggestions on specific products? (i'm on a VERY tight budget)
 

Shewie

Mod
Mod
Dec 15, 2005
24,260
17
44
Yorkshire
There's really only a couple of options if you're going to buy one. The cheapest and only synthetic model is the Snugpak underblanket designed by our very own Wanderinstar, Lakeland and DD stock them now I think.
The other option is a down version, obviously a lot lighter and packs down smaller but you pay for it. You can get a 3/4 length version from Unsponsored (look in the classifieds) which will see you good through a British winter if you pair it with your sleeping bag. Another option is to buy from across the pond, have a look on hammockforums.net for some info and a list of the guys who produce them. I've got the Speer Snugfit which cost a bob or two and I've got one of Phils 3/4 bags, I use the 3/4 for most of the year but I'll be switching to the Snugfit for my next trips now.

For your budget go for the Snugpak, it packs to a similar size to a 3 season synthetic bag and comes in just over 1kg I think. I used one for a couple of years and was really happy with it, I only upgraded to the Snugfit and 3/4 to shave a few pounds.
 

EastSussexScout

Tenderfoot
Feb 27, 2010
64
0
Brighton
Just a thought. Can anyone see any flaws in buying a fleece blanket, folding over the ends and stitching then to make 2 sleeves at each enn then running some elastic cord through the sleeves and clipping them into my karabiner drip rings???
 

Shewie

Mod
Mod
Dec 15, 2005
24,260
17
44
Yorkshire
Give it a go, you could probably test it without cutting anything up. From what I've heard folk mention in the past, fleece is okay for a summer time solution but when it starts to get cooler then they're not much crack. I suppose it's the same as just sleeping in a fleece bag liner instead of a proper sleeping bag. For colder nights out you really need something like down or some hollow fibre matting to trap warm air and block cool breezes. Maybe another option is to get hold of some shockcord and a cheap £10 sleeping bag and butcher it up to make an DIY underblanket.
 

Nagual

Native
Jun 5, 2007
1,963
0
Argyll
Someone made such a blanket a while ago.. but who it was escapes me just now, I'm sure there was a tutorial of sorts too, using a poncho and fleece blanket.

Found the link: clicky here
 
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EastSussexScout

Tenderfoot
Feb 27, 2010
64
0
Brighton
Well shewie, I was thinking about doubling or even tripleing the fleece over and stitching the edges before sewing in the sleeves at the ends. Any idea where is best to get elastic cord?
 

Shewie

Mod
Mod
Dec 15, 2005
24,260
17
44
Yorkshire
Well shewie, I was thinking about doubling or even tripleing the fleece over and stitching the edges before sewing in the sleeves at the ends. Any idea where is best to get elastic cord?
I get mine off ebay normally, do a search for shockcord or bungee cord and you should get some come up. I get black 3mm in 10m lengths which is handy
 

seg1959

Forager
Feb 8, 2010
118
0
Surrey, UK
There's really only a couple of options if you're going to buy one. The cheapest and only synthetic model is the Snugpak underblanket designed by our very own Wanderinstar, Lakeland and DD stock them now I think.
The other option is a down version, obviously a lot lighter and packs down smaller but you pay for it. You can get a 3/4 length version from Unsponsored (look in the classifieds) which will see you good through a British winter if you pair it with your sleeping bag. Another option is to buy from across the pond, have a look on hammockforums.net for some info and a list of the guys who produce them. I've got the Speer Snugfit which cost a bob or two and I've got one of Phils 3/4 bags, I use the 3/4 for most of the year but I'll be switching to the Snugfit for my next trips now.

For your budget go for the Snugpak, it packs to a similar size to a 3 season synthetic bag and comes in just over 1kg I think. I used one for a couple of years and was really happy with it, I only upgraded to the Snugfit and 3/4 to shave a few pounds.

+1 for Unsponsored underblankets - depending on what you want (2/3 or 3/4 season, i.e. how much dawn you want in it) it could be cheaper than the Snugpak synthetic bag, and you cannot beat dawn for comfort, warmth and small packed size. Well worth PM'ing him to see what he has.
The ones from across the pond were overpriced in my view.

seg
 

Beardy Adam

Tenderfoot
Sep 7, 2010
96
0
West Yorkshire
I don't wish to be ignorant but I never used a hammock and have never put one up. Why do you need an underblanket? Wouldn't you just use a closed cell foam mat and a sleeping bag?
 

Nagual

Native
Jun 5, 2007
1,963
0
Argyll
I don't wish to be ignorant but I never used a hammock and have never put one up. Why do you need an underblanket? Wouldn't you just use a closed cell foam mat and a sleeping bag?
Not ignorant at all. You certainly can use closed cell mats or even self inflating mats either under your sleeping bag or in between the 2 layers(if it has 2 layers). The advantages to a UQ is that it can be lighter and take up less space in your pack, it can wrap to your body shape too helping you stay warmer. Depending on the quilt it could be a lot warmer than a mat too. But it's all horses for courses at the end of the day.
 

Wayland

Hárbarðr
One problem with hammocks is that they wrap around you which means they compress the sleeping bag at the sides as well as underneath you.

Because the insulation properties of your sleeping bag depend on loft, this then creates cold spots down your sides and back.

As kip mat will generally insulate underneath but not at the sides.

An underblanket is set up outside the hammock so it lofts fully without being compressed. The result is much better insulation.
 

oetzi

Settler
Apr 25, 2005
813
2
60
below Frankenstein castle
A poncho liner or similar blanket, with ropes attatched at the corners and on the short sides shortened by an internat drawcord, which one can add easily by sewing on a channel, works great:


I added an old poncho to have more protection against wind.
I am a very cold sleeper, but this arrangement and more clothes fiiled onto the liner, gave me a warm back down to +10°C.
As always with any underblanket, you have to adjust the tension to have it close enough to the underside of your hammock to avoid cold spots.