Sore mouth.

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santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
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The Air Force considers it beneficial enough that they increase the number of cleanings (descaling) for diabetics. Not doing so has been linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke. Enough so that insurance companies likewise increase the number of cleanings (they’re not known for spending more money than they have to unless it will benefit them by reducing future claims)
 

Corso

Full Member
Aug 13, 2007
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Corso, are you serious? I am genuinely asking.
Don't take my word for it. Just do the research.

They can't even agree on mouthwash

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science...l-beneficial-bacteria-mouth-trigger-diabetes/

https://www.nhs.uk/news/cancer/is-frequent-mouthwash-use-linked-to-oral-cancer/

I'm not saying don't go to the dentist that's up to you what I'm saying is shop around and don't just take their word for the 'treatments' you need - filling a painful hole is one thing but the latest fad treatment thats supposed to benifit you without published research no thanks I'm not paying for that

The fact that dental care has become exempt from NHS services speaks volumes to me

anyway not here to stir the pot just sharing my experience
 

petrochemicals

Full Member
Jul 30, 2012
3,555
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westmidlands
Recieding gum problems can be helped by brushing downward from the gum toward the top of the tooth, makes the gums stretch.

Scale nhs version runs to a dentist scraping eith a pointy thing by youir gums, pay private to see a hygenist, scale and Polish with an ultrasonic water pressure washer thing, absolutely pain free.
 
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santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
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Florida
Recieding gum problems can be helped by brushing downward from the gum toward the top of the tooth, makes the gums stretch.

Scale nhs version runs to a dentist scraping eith a pointy thing by youir gums, pay private to see a hygenist, scale and Polish with an ultrasonic water pressure washer thing, absolutely pain free.
We can get either here as well. That said, it’s always the hygienist doing it here before the dentist comes in for a quick exam. Personally I find the process annoying and uncomfortable but I don’t really feel any pain either way.
 

Chainsaw

Native
Jul 23, 2007
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Central Scotland
Mouthwash is like handsanitizer/disinfectant spray, yes it may kill on a wide spectrum but the bad stuff does you more harm than the good stuff does you good so net/net it's worth it. I don't use mouthwash very often and tbh I can't really see the point in it due to the low fluoride concentration, there are maybe some corner cases where it's useful but not for me. PS the NHS article you quote concludes There is certainly no credible evidence that mouthwash "can give you cancer".

You don't really need science to back up the link between poor oral hygiene and tooth loss through perio problems, there are millions of cases walking around today but even applying some basic logic shows the truth of it.

Imagine your knife gets wet (plaque) and you don't clean and dry and lube it, it'll eventually develop into rust (calculus/tartar) Now assume just a tiny bit of water gets under the scales and develops into rust which expands the gap then more water (plaque) collects in there cos is easy to get in and hard to dry (clean) which then rusts some more, expands and eventually the scales fall off/become loose as heck. If you can't get to the rust to clean it out, the knife is pretty much doomed in the long term. It's the same mechanism. It's a very simple analogy and doesn't take into account the bodies immune response (makes things worse through swelling) and healing ability (wish my knives did that!) but the basics are the same.

Also you say dental care has become exempt from NHS services, why do you say that (I'm interested as my wife has been an NHS dentist for the last 30 years and I'm wondering who's paying her wages...) and https://www.nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/nhs-services/dentists/

However I do agree with you in that a dentist is like a car mechanic, a doctor, a plumber or anyone else providing a service, you should always make efforts to understand the options they offer you, the cost, the implications etc Do shop around and find one you like and trust (I still to go the same mechanic even though I moved away from him 22 years ago!) Most Doctors and Dentists can be trusted they don't intentionally proscribe bad treatment for you as they will need to pick up the pieces if it goes wrong but there are always options for you to choose from and most dentists would rather not see you ever than have you back and in pain every week (bad PR and the don't get paid for fixing problems they already should have fixed)

As another genuine question what are your thoughts on vaccinations?
 
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Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
It is a thought ( not scientifically proven) that it is the alcohol in the mouthwash that is possibly causing some oral cancers. This is a tangent from the (scientifically proved) fact that excessive/daily consumtion of alcohol increses the rish for oral, oesofhagus and stomach cancer.
( not all mouthwash contain alcohol though)
 

Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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All professions have the odd dishonest member. Some people are that way. To imply that most in a profession are dishonest is frankly speaking ridiculous.
Also, the treatments we do have nit only sound academic research behind it, but also years of millions of sucessful treatments.

Basically, nothing we do is ‘new’.
Many people think implants are new, but in fact they were invented in the firm used today by prof. Brånemark in the late 1950’, and developed clinically by him in the 1960’. Much more research and developmrnt has been done since, call it fine tuning, simplyfied clinical ptocedures and so on.
 

Corso

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Aug 13, 2007
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Also you say dental care has become exempt from NHS services, why do you say that (I'm interested as my wife has been an NHS dentist for the last 30 years and I'm wondering who's paying her wages...) and https://www.nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/nhs-services/dentists/

You don't have to pay if you're:
  • under 18, or under 19 and in full-time education
  • pregnant or have had a baby in the previous 12 months
  • being treated in an NHS hospital and your treatment is carried out by the hospital dentist (but you may have to pay for any dentures or bridges)
  • receiving low income benefits, or you're under 20 and a dependant of someone receiving low income benefits
otherwise you'll be charged for your care anything for £20-£250 depending on which band the treatment you need fits into

Not exactly free at the point of care which is the ethos of the NHS is it...
 
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Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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Tengu:
Saline solution: one heapef teaspoon of table salt in one liter of lukewarm water is strong enough. Any stronger and you can do damage to the inflamed gums.

Try the TePe toothpicks she recommended. It is very difficult to demonstrate things on other prople, hence the pain. When you do it - no pain.
But use NO toothpaste.

Many patients say - why fill a hole as I am not in pain?
The reason is, once you feel pain from a hole ( decay) then it is very close to the nerve. The treatment then is sometimes not just a filling, but a rootcanal treatment first, as the nerve can get damaged when we remove the decayed tooth structure, or that the decay has gone into the nerve.
Also, a small filling is easier for us to make, will last stronger, and there is more left of the tooth ( stronger tooth - less risk for fracture of tooth)

Do not wait with having decayed teeth filled!
 
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Chainsaw

Native
Jul 23, 2007
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Not disputing it's not free for all, the NHS do pay a portion of the fees (15% IIRC) but it is still free for anyone on low income benefits, under 18s (and 19s and 20s in special cases)
Under 18s are about 20% of the population, benefits, dunno, say 20% again, chucking in preggers people and the special cases then say about 40-45% population get it for free.

Not exactly "dental care has become exempt from NHS services" is it?
 
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Corso

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But why is Dentistry a special case? You don't hand over cash for any other NHS service and particularly not a service that is being offered to you without an MDT or Peer review?
 

Tengu

Full Member
Jan 10, 2006
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Well, that gum has recceded well and I can see the bone.

I may like seeing bones but I dont really want to see my OWN bones...yuck.

I am not on the NHS exempt list, in spite of having no income...

I havent had a clean since I came to Cornwall; thats what, five years now? I am going to get the hole filled end of April, I definatley will be talking about that capping thing and a clean then. (Everyone else seems to be cleaned regularly, why wasnt I offered it?)

Perhaps they think I bite.

I was given a short questionare when I went in `how much do you like your smile?`

I did not fill this in. I can see peddling cosmetic treatment when its under my nose.
 

Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
It can not be the bone you see. Exposed bone is necrotic (dead) which is extremely painful ( from the surrounding living but inflamed bone)
What you see is the root of the tooth, as your gingiva has shrunk ( swelling gone)


Did you go for an emergency visit, or a regular full exam with x rays?
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
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I’m confused; your dentists don’t have to take peer reviewed courses and pass a peer reviewed exam before being licensed to practice?
 

Corso

Full Member
Aug 13, 2007
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How would a Multi Disciplinary Team (review) or a Peer Review benefit the caregiver, patient or NHS itself?

How would it be done?
Can you realy not see the benifit? I am shocked

Every other area of health care (in the NHS atleast) requires it, its easily done especially with modern technology, you don't even have to be in the same country to discuss cases, review practice and ensure parity in patient safety, treatment sucess and shared learning.

of course its not a requirment for private practice...
 

Nice65

Full Member
Apr 16, 2009
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Well, that gum has recceded well and I can see the bone.

I may like seeing bones but I dont really want to see my OWN bones...yuck.

I am not on the NHS exempt list, in spite of having no income...

I havent had a clean since I came to Cornwall; thats what, five years now? I am going to get the hole filled end of April, I definatley will be talking about that capping thing and a clean then. (Everyone else seems to be cleaned regularly, why wasnt I offered it?)

Perhaps they think I bite.

I was given a short questionare when I went in `how much do you like your smile?`

I did not fill this in. I can see peddling cosmetic treatment when its under my nose.
Cleaning isn’t done on the NHS, it costs. Do try and find the cash for a decent electric, preferably sonic, toothbrush R. It’s cheaper than the cost of a dentist once cleaning session. A clean and polish, then a regimen of twice daily electric toothbrush with a non abrasive paste will do. The brushes have a quadrant timer which helps you spend enough time on your teeth. Toothpaste is easily made from baking soda and mint oil. Clove oil if you have sore gums.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Can you realy not see the benifit? I am shocked

Every other area of health care (in the NHS atleast) requires it, its easily done especially with modern technology, you don't even have to be in the same country to discuss cases, review practice and ensure parity in patient safety, treatment sucess and shared learning.

of course its not a requirment for private practice...
To keep your registration you need to do a certain amount of post grad courses every year.

When I worked for NHS ( approx 1/3 of my working hours) I was so busy I hardly had time for a wee. I know my friends working under the NHS umbrella today say the same.

Also, I do not think you understand the economic situation for NHS dentistry. Discussing cases and stuff is done during lunch hour.

If a dentist get stuck ( unable to diagnose ) we ask either a colleague nearby or if they can not help, a specialist.

Remember, dentists are paid only when they work and produce dentistry, not like hospital doctors that are paid by hour spent at hospital.
All staff wages, materials, equipment, rent, insurance, water, electricity, budiness rates, every single outlay to have a practice, comes out of the renumeration generated by a dentist sitting and working with a patient!

Many think a NHS clinic is a ‘NHS clinic’ but in reality it is a private enterprice partially funded though work done under a NHS contract.