'Overlevnad' PDF Download in English

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TeeDee

Full Member
Nov 6, 2008
5,455
441
46
Exeter
Just wanted to say a big sincere thank you for doing this. Probably going to be alot more people thanking you and singing your praises when you finish but i just wanted to get in early and give to a little taster of what appreciation is.

Thanks guys. We all do/will appreciate the effort.
 

forestwalker

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nope, can't be ice auger.
That's one of these:


An "Isbil" is more like a massive chisel with a long handle. "Ice chisel"?? "Ice pick"??

Unless he of course means "Isbil" = The Ice-Wagon/-Car bringing you ice to your ice-box at home. Got to keep those beers chilled. That's true survival!!! ;)
In "The Snow Walkers Companion" the tool is refered to as Ice chisel.
 

Karl5

Full Member
May 16, 2007
341
0
54
Switzerland
Fotlappar -- I'l poke an aracheologist and a dress historian about that (squares of cloth wrapped around the foot)
That's possibly the most appropriate to use in this case - "Foot wrap cloth"
Easier/better to use an expression that most people instinctively understand, rather than an expression you have to be an archeologist and/or dress historian to know, don't you think?

Call a spade a spade, not a digging implement...
Or, if you like - K.I.S.S.
 

forestwalker

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
That's possibly the most appropriate to use in this case - "Foot wrap cloth"
Easier/better to use an expression that most people instinctively understand, rather than an expression you have to be an archeologist and/or dress historian to know, don't you think?
Both yes and no. If there is a word it should be used, or it will disappear from the language. adding an explanation is however enirely proper if one is using a "1% word", i.e. one that only 1% of the population would know. And it might also be the case that English has a name for it, that is self explanatory, and then it would be wrong for us to invent a new term, since that would only add to the confusion.
 

Chris G

Settler
Mar 23, 2007
912
0
Cheshire
Thanks for the responses so far.

Does anyone have a translation for "Axelskydd" and "liggunderlaget" as "axle skid" and "retention base" don't sound right? For context refer to page 19 under Insoles.

Chris

PS, and "Forsoksverksamhet" as Pilot doesn't seem right.
 

Tadpole

Full Member
Nov 12, 2005
2,842
20
56
Bristol
Thanks for the responses so far.

Does anyone have a translation for "Axelskydd" and "liggunderlaget" as "axle skid" and "retention base" don't sound right? For context refer to page 19 under Insoles.

Chris
Axelskydd= shoulder pad
liggunderlag(et)= Bed roll

"Forsoksverksamhet" as Pilot doesn't seem right.
Forsoksverksamhet
försök = try/ trial/ attempt
verksamhet= activities/ work
 

forestwalker

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Does anyone have a translation for "Axelskydd" and "liggunderlaget" as "axle skid" and "retention base" don't sound right? For context refer to page 19 under Insoles.

"Forsoksverksamhet" as Pilot doesn't seem right.
Axelskydd - the padding on a shoulder strap on a backpack
liggunderlaget - foam pad (as in kip mat)

Försöksverksamhet -- trial, study, experiment, etc

The litteral machine translations sound entertaining. Almost as good as when a friend took all the docs for a LARP and accepted the first suggestion of Words spellchecker...
 

Karl5

Full Member
May 16, 2007
341
0
54
Switzerland
should be easy to translate just post the text in one of the meny translators and have that do the job for you!
It would be excellent if it would work that way.
But unfortunately these translators aren't up to scratch yet.

Just for fun:
Translate a text of your choice (to any other language) in one of those translators.
Take what you get out, and translate that through the same translator back to english.
The result is often quite funny.
Much like that kids game where one wispers a word to No.2, who wispers what he/she heard to No.3 and so forth until it's back to where it came from. It never ends with the same word it started with.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,505
1,628
S. Lanarkshire
Doesn't quite work Bill...........The flesh is weak but the spirit is willing, comes back as, "The meat has gone bad but the whisky is strong " :rolleyes: :D

As both an Archaeologist and a clothing historian, I agree that Footwraps is the usual English translation. Though I would point out that in general Western Europe uses squares while the Russians use rectangles. They get wrapped slightly differently.

cheers,
Toddy
 

Tadpole

Full Member
Nov 12, 2005
2,842
20
56
Bristol
Doesn't quite work Bill...........The flesh is weak but the spirit is willing, comes back as, "The meat has gone bad but the whisky is strong " :rolleyes: :D

As both an Archaeologist and a clothing historian, I agree that Footwraps is the usual English translation. Though I would point out that in general Western Europe uses squares while the Russians use rectangles. They get wrapped slightly differently.

cheers,
Toddy
I remember watching a programme on the television, a few years back, where Russian nuclear submariners were issued with 1m x1m square of cloth from which they made socks, or wrap-round (foot-wrappings) the cloth was cut across the longest corner (so it looked like a triangular bandage) to make two wrappings
I think it is the bottom of the two on this image
http://www.rkka.msk.ru/rbp/rbp019.jpg
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,505
1,628
S. Lanarkshire
I remember watching a programme on the television, a few years back, where Russian nuclear submariners were issued with 1m x1m square of cloth from which they made socks, or wrap-round (foot-wrappings) the cloth was cut across the longest corner (so it looked like a triangular bandage) to make two wrappings
I think it is the bottom of the two on this image
http://www.rkka.msk.ru/rbp/rbp019.jpg

I've never seen triangular ones, only square and rectangular. I must admit if I'd been given a metre square I'd have made two rectangles. It's just the way it wraps. Triangle just doesn't work well.
I think what that image actually shows is the foot positioned into one right angled corner of a rectangle. The two sets of drawings show right and left feet being wrapped.

It's one of those hard to explain but easy to show things.
If you have a triangular bandage and a handtowel, try it with them both. Hopefully that'll make things clearer than I am managing to do.


cheers.
Toddy