Old Tools are Fantastic!

  • Hey Guest, We're having our annual Winter Moot and we'd love you to come. PLEASE LOOK HERE to secure your place and get more information.
    For forum threads CLICK HERE

Mesquite

Anyone for sailing?
Mar 5, 2008
25,613
1,445
60
~Hemel Hempstead~
They were being sold separately Steve :rolleyes:. Thankfully at a reasonable price so I smiled nicely and bought them both (I was using your Stanley no. 8 just the other day by the way - I mentally thank you each time).
It's gone to the right place and I'm glad it's getting the proper use it deserves Hugh :)
 

British Red

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Dec 30, 2005
25,815
764
Mercia
It's gone to the right place and I'm glad it's getting the proper use it deserves Hugh :)
It's last outing was rather nice. A chippy I know was retiring and gave me sacks of "offcuts" "for the woodburner". Some great big pieces of 2" thick Sapele included (rough sawn from making hardwood sash windows). My old, tiny Mum bought a new garden bench for her retirement flat but her legs didn't reach the ground! I planned up a lovely bit of that Sapele, Danish oiled it and cut some legs. She was blown away by her heavy, hardwood, outdoor footstool. I told her that you made it possible ;)
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Mesquite

demographic

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 15, 2005
4,484
498
-------------
It's possibly worth pointing out that although Rosewoods (few species under that title) are beautiful to make plane totes and the like from (some of my older planes have them) its used much less nowadays because its usage is regulated under the cities treaty due to over exploitation.
Thats not to say that black plastic is the only other option though and I have a nice modern Chinese copy of the no longer made by Stanley 112 scraper plane with a Cherry tote and knob which personally I think is at least its equal in that nebulous quality of "Feel".
Don't get me wrong, there's loads of excellent old tools out there, but if people think there's no modern stuff as good they're just not looking in the right places.

Back in the day I suspect a good handplane cost the best part of a tradesmans weeks wages so even the cost isn't far off.
 

henchy3rd

Settler
Apr 16, 2012
522
343
Derby
Yup, I agree to a standard.
When I lived in a commune for sustainable living, there was no modern electrical hand tools or machinery allowed.. it was all old school..axe,hand planes, brace & bit, plumb lines..Even milking the jersey cows were done by hand. Scything the land was hard & laborious but very rewarding.
You measured 3 times & cut once as the time making whatever took ages, so it had to be done right.
The logs for the heating/ range cooking were cut & seasoned from the woods too.
But at least you slept well as we were knackered at the end of the day.( I preferred to have a strip wash in the natural spring than a bath).
Would I go back, more than likely.

However, being in the building trade,modern is the standard as I couldn’t imagine the cost or time of build something the traditional ways.
My grandad wouldn’t even think about picking up an electrical drill as he didn’t like the idea of them( I can see him in my memory drilling into house bricks with bit & brace).
Great memories bought up from a random topic..thanks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: British Red

British Red

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Dec 30, 2005
25,815
764
Mercia
Yup, I agree to a standard.
When I lived in a commune for sustainable living, there was no modern electrical hand tools or machinery allowed.. it was all old school..axe,hand planes, brace & bit, plumb lines..Even milking the jersey cows were done by hand. Scything the land was hard & laborious but very rewarding.
You measured 3 times & cut once as the time making whatever took ages, so it had to be done right.
The logs for the heating/ range cooking were cut & seasoned from the woods too.
But at least you slept well as we were knackered at the end of the day.( I preferred to have a strip wash in the natural spring than a bath).
Would I go back, more than likely.

However, being in the building trade,modern is the standard as I couldn’t imagine the cost or time of build something the traditional ways.
My grandad wouldn’t even think about picking up an electrical drill as he didn’t like the idea of them( I can see him in my memory drilling into house bricks with bit & brace).
Great memories bought up from a random topic..thanks.
I cannot deny the efficiency of power tools. Heck I use them myself, would hate to be without my DeWalt XR cordless range. But, just maybe, that's part of the issue? We can do things so fast now, from putting up a wall to ploughing a field that we tend not to value the output as much. As you will know from experience, if you raise your own food with your own sweat & toil, food waste is extremely unlikely!
 

henchy3rd

Settler
Apr 16, 2012
522
343
Derby
I cannot deny the efficiency of power tools. Heck I use them myself, would hate to be without my DeWalt XR cordless range. But, just maybe, that's part of the issue? We can do things so fast now, from putting up a wall to ploughing a field that we tend not to value the output as much. As you will know from experience, if you raise your own food with your own sweat & toil, food waste is extremely unlikely!
Someone once said to me, when the oil finally runs out & society collapses can I live with you.
That put a smile on my face.
So maybe those antique tools will be the new gold.
 
  • Like
Reactions: British Red

British Red

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Dec 30, 2005
25,815
764
Mercia
Someone once said to me, when the oil finally runs out & society collapses can I live with you.
That put a smile on my face.
So maybe those antique tools will be the new gold.

I do like to ensure that all our tools have manual equivalents- be that crosscut saws, Yankee screwdrivers or steel wedges with a sledgehammer!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Broch

BCUK Shop

We have a a number of knives, T-Shirts and other items for sale.

SHOP HERE