Offensive Weapons Act 2019: surrender and compensation scheme. December 2020 - March 2021

  • Hey Guest, For sale we have Hultafors Outdoor Knives with Firesteel PLEASE LOOK HERE for more information or use the Pay Now button in the sidebar

Wildgoose

Full Member
May 15, 2012
439
139
Middlesex
Looks like a rich already answered the question but I think but only asking about sabers you narrowed the scope too much. I’m sure those using sabers aren’t the only sorting clubs. Sporting matches with the maligned katana is indeed a legitimate sporting activity. There are also any martial arts programs that still teach the throwing star (although I don’t know of any copetitions with them) Also think of the Medieval
Yes I used sabres as an example, I believe all of the above would be covered by sporting activity.
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
6,256
1,253
Bedfordshire
Looks like a rich already answered the question but I think but only asking about sabers you narrowed the scope too much. I’m sure those using sabers aren’t the only sorting clubs. Sporting matches with the maligned katana is indeed a legitimate sporting activity. There are also any martial arts programs that still teach the throwing star (although I don’t know of any copetitions with them) Also think of the Medieval Fighting Society’s tournaments.

Was that "There are also many martial arts programs that still teach the throwing star."?

This is a good read

I have not heard of the Medieval Fighting Society. There is a Medieval Combat Society in the UK, but their combat is knights in period dress (armour), using a style of "combat" that is "safe, highly enjoyable, and yet entertaining for the public to watch." They also do archery, dancing and encampments for the whole family. They are in no danger from the offensive weapon legislation.

A rather more serious organisation would be the HEMA Alliance, which is international and holds actual fencing style matches with a variety of weapons. As the legislation only applies to metal swords with curved blades and provides for defences related to sporting activities, there is still a lot of scope for such matches to carry on.
 

Minotaur

Native
Apr 27, 2005
1,210
55
Birmingham
I guess it could, unless it was hand forged or made before 1954.
Whilst I can see it will bring on the pains for true enthusiasts it could be argued that the majority of the items now banned serve little practical legitimate purpose in the 21st century
Would really like some clarification on the hand forged and traditional made business?
I am not sure what they are trying to say with that at all.

How much would a hand forged Katana cost? A national treasure one would be astronomically I would have thought.
 

Wildgoose

Full Member
May 15, 2012
439
139
Middlesex
Would really like some clarification on the hand forged and traditional made business?
I am not sure what they are trying to say with that at all.

How much would a hand forged Katana cost? A national treasure one would be astronomically I would have thought.
The legislation is not designed to take them out of the hands of true collectors or sports enthusiasts, it’s to get them from people’s bedsides and behind the front door.
as Mr Claycomb says it’s the seaside novelty shop samurai/Klingon blades that are being targeted.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Minotaur

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
6,256
1,253
Bedfordshire
Years ago I visited Doc Price's forge down in Plymouth as part of a BB hammer-in. I got to see some of his collection of Japanese style swords. He did a bit of mixing on some, forging them from Wootz that he made himself.
Calling things hand forged might be read a couple of different ways. Most sword smiths (and many bladesmiths in general) use some form of press and/or power hammer. The blades are still refined with hand held hammers, but the grunt work of drawing out is done with help.

Defining traditionally made is going to remain vague. I doubt that it would be insisted that its only traditional if forged from tamahagane, but can well imagine that forging would be required.

A slight change of subject, but if you want a bit of a mind blowing look at sword making, you need to look at Kyle Royer's Excelsior project on Youtube.
 

Minotaur

Native
Apr 27, 2005
1,210
55
Birmingham
The legislation is not designed to take them out of the hands of true collectors or sports enthusiasts, it’s to get them from people’s bedsides and behind the front door.
as Mr Claycomb says it’s the seaside novelty shop samurai/Klingon blades that are being targeted.
I am not grabbing my Bat'leth and screaming "Heghlu'meH QaQ jajvam" at an intruder.

Defining traditionally made is going to remain vague. I doubt that it would be insisted that its only traditional if forged from tamahagane, but can well imagine that forging would be required.
Defining traditional with Katanas would be a complete nightmare.

A slight change of subject, but if you want a bit of a mind blowing look at sword making, you need to look at Kyle Royer's Excelsior project on Youtube.
That looks really interesting. Strangely fascinated by sword and knife making with almost no desire to do it myself. I watch way too much Forged in Fire.
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
6,256
1,253
Bedfordshire
;) so we are talking bronze, or iron? Why stop there? Its not really traditional unless it is made or styled as per the Palaeolithic. :D But, since one cannot chip a katana from stone, nor cast one from bronze, I guess we will have to allow that the tradition of making those is tied to forging.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Minotaur

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
4,396
3,612
Mid Wales
I don't know of any bronze Japanese swords but the Chinese Goujian sword was definitely bronze (though quite short and not curved). I don't think the curved steel swords of Japan appeared until about the 8th century - I may be wrong, it's a long time since I was into this stuff :)

As you said, the term "traditional method" is wide open :)

 

Minotaur

Native
Apr 27, 2005
1,210
55
Birmingham
Traditional traditional would be cast of course :)
That sort of my point, if you use a power hammer are you still traditional enough or do you have to spend 10 years training 2 people to alternatively hit the iron?
If you have a Viking Sword is it traditional enough when we are not 100% how they forged them?
How experimental does your archaeology have to be to be traditional enough?

The thing I do not get is I bet us sensible adults could re-write all these laws into a nice simple clear 2 pages that makes perfect sense to everyone.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,814
1,031
64
Florida
The legislation is not designed to take them out of the hands of true collectors or sports enthusiasts, it’s to get them from people’s bedsides and behind the front door.
as Mr Claycomb says it’s the seaside novelty shop samurai/Klingon blades that are being targeted.
"....from people's bedsides and behind the front door?" I can see a desire to take them out of a criminals hands but why on earth would you want to take away what sounds like a last ditch defense from a homeowner/renter?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Minotaur

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,814
1,031
64
Florida
The legislation is not designed to take them out of the hands of true collectors or sports enthusiasts, it’s to get them from people’s bedsides and behind the front door.
as Mr Claycomb says it’s the seaside novelty shop samurai/Klingon blades that are being targeted.
"....from people's bedsides and behind the front door?" I can see a desire to take them out of a criminals hands but why on earth would you want to take away what sounds like a last ditch defense from a homeowner/renter?
 

Hultafors Outdoor knife for Sale

We have a a number of Hultafors Outdoor Knives with Firesteels for sale.

You can see more details here in this thread OUTDOOR KNIVES The price is £27 posted to the UK. Pay via the paypal button below.