My First Solo Overnighter - Kit

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Repperz

Member
Feb 3, 2014
49
0
Tonbridge area..
Hi guys,

I'm a teenager who's loves hiking/backpacking etc but I'm fairly new to bushcraft, and I'm going on my first ever solo overnighter in a couple of weeks time. I thought it would be good practice for me to do a video run through of the kit I've prepared so far so you guys can give some helpful hints were needed. What I do/don't need etc etc Let me know what you think. Enjoy! :D

PS sorry for the screwed up voice in the video, had a sore throat recently...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsQbtlvwQa8

NOTE: - I have added some tinder to my fire kit since this video


Cheers guys
Repperz :D
 

redandshane

Native
Oct 20, 2007
1,581
0
Batheaston
Hey I really enjoy looking at peoples load outs so thanks for that

As its only an overnighter you should be fine really. A couple of things for you to consider
Clothing Glad to see you are taking a hat;personally I would not take two coats. Consider something warmer and lighter than the crappy Parka ;a Fleece or Wool Jumper maybe ?
Water-I am obsessive about this. Everyone underestimates how much water they will need so Will you be near a water source if yes then reconsider how much you need to carry in while on that subject wont your water bottle fit inside the crusader that would save a bit of space.I would also take another cup a cheap plastic one would do that way you can have a brew and use your crusader for food
Ditch the space blanket I would take the Army Basha and build your shelter around that rather than a cheap tarp You shouldn't need pegs really you can easily make stakes or use natural anchors
Bivvy bag even a cheap Gelert type one will protect your sleeping bag and obviously help keep you dry an Army one would be better though
Tools - I am certain you will manage with what you have;but a fixed blade and a folding Saw would be very useful investments. No need to spend big money A Hultafors or Mora and a garden centre folding saw will do to start with plenty of time for gucci gear for you in the future young man!I would take more cordage as well

As I said I am fairly certain you will manage with what you have so these are just some of my thoughts on where you could tweak things
The best way is to do exactly what you are doing; get out try some gear take a note of what works what doesn't. What suits you what doesn't and then refine your kit accordingly.
Have a great time
Oh a bit of an afterthought but in this day and age there's no reason not to have a phone with you in case something does go wrong which is unlikely but possible
 

Purgatorio

Member
Jan 9, 2014
24
0
The Netherlands
Nice video, and nice to see your open minded view on this! And you can surely go. Some remarks, if i may, have to do with the time you can go, and the weather.
I would also only take the berghaus. As said, tuf but heavy and does not much for warmth.
A cotton T-shirt, and if i am correct the norwegian shirt is 100% cotton aswell would not be my first choice. A fleece or syntetic insulation or wool jumper work when wet or damp.
Head torch in top pocket, since your going later in the day. And therefore fill your pack in the way that you will going use the gear.
Nothing more irritating than on arrival in the rain or darkness unpacking everything to get to that one item on the bottom of pack.
Since tour sleeping pad is thin, the space blanket might be handy when it's cold and can be put under your sleeping bag.
I second, an extra container for water.
Depending on the time of arrival you don't want to stumble around in the dark and cutting pegs from dead wood. Because you would not want to make them from green wood to safe a tree. So the pegs might be handy. It safes time and effort.
Plan on using hexamine for your first hot brew. You will have some more time and energy for a good shelter, building a good fire takes time. But all depending on hours of daylight left and the weather.
As you mentioned putting your food in a drybag, would be a wise thing, and you don't need a drybag for your tarp. When wet, put it on the outside of your pack.
A large plastic (trash)bag to put your sleepingpad in. When it rains a dry pad is a much nicer start:)
And i guess one knife is enough and if you plan on building a fire, indeed a mentioned small saw would indeed come in handy.
And....have fun!! And take your camera:))



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weekender

Full Member
Feb 26, 2006
1,809
2
51
Cambridge
Well your better prepared then I am😀😳 it's made have another look at my kit.
Some good advice already given, just remember warm, dry and comfortable and tell someone where your heading keep safe!! And have fun.
Personally I would take the tarp as it's larger like you said.
 

Repperz

Member
Feb 3, 2014
49
0
Tonbridge area..
Hi again,

Thanks for the suggestions.

So far I have:

-added some tinder to my firekit
-Moved my water bottle from one pocket to the other so it sits in the crusader mug
- Put my food in a waterproof stuff sack and moved it to the pocket where the water used to be
- Put my berghaus just under the lid of my bag - quick access
- Packed another fleece
- Added a small 0.6L billy can thing that fits in the top pocket of the bag with my brew kit and teatowel inside it
- Got a binliner to put over my sleeping mat
- Rearranged things a bit (eg: torch now easily reached)
- Since I now have room for it, I'll add another water bottle
- Moved my work gloves onto a karibina to clip on my belt/ stuff in cargo pocket for easier access
- Added some cordage

Also I'm getting a good look at the land I will camp on soon - so I can get an idea of water sources etc etc, and availability of wood. It looks like I'll be camping when my half term starts at school, so I will have a full day's worth of light to set up, and hopefully I can get a good shelter and a nice fire made in that time. Also, I plan on leaving the parka at home if the weather stays anything like it is now - wet! - but if it looks like a dry trip I'll take it (sorry I just have a weird attachment to that thing from constant use ;) ). And of course I'm taking the camera :p If anything does go wrong at least you guys will get a kick out of it ;).

Also, to Redandshane:
I think I'll take the tarp not the basha because it larger and can be used as both a groundsheet and shelter (if I decide not to risk sleeping in my own ;)) - and I don't mind if it gets a little damaged by fire embers. Yeh, a bivvy bag would be ideal, but I don't have at the moment (I always use a tent or tarp when hiking). Thanks for all the other tips though! :)

Well, that's about it for now.

Cheers guys,
Repperz
 

Repperz

Member
Feb 3, 2014
49
0
Tonbridge area..
Yes I am - I have the work gloves but I may also take something a little warmer.

Also, saw the permission - lots of dead wood, and I bought a folding saw with a bit of allowance money to take with me so I can make shelter and firewood easier
 

Mick721

Full Member
Oct 29, 2012
748
2
Sunderland
I'm sure you'll get a load of advice about what kit to take or not take. You seem to have all the basics covered. I would certainly invest in a bivvy bag. You can pick up a half decent one for little money. A wet sleeping bag means a long, cold, miserable night out and may put you off from ever going out again!

Two things I picked up on though, firstly, your knife blade is in bad shape. Remember that a sharp knife is a safe knife, so if you intend to use it, make sure that you put some work into bringing that up to a good standard. Along with that, make sure you know how to use everything in your first aid pack and that you have considered the contents carefully. The last thing you want is be in a situation where you are alone with an injury and suddenly find that the first aid kit is inadequate, and you lack the skills necessary to deal with said injury.

Secondly, don't use you tents pegs as a grill. They are more than likely galvanised steel. This gives off very toxic fumes when heated. Stainless steel is best for cooking over.

Last of all, have fun! (Oh, and take pics. If there's no pics then it didn't happen :))
 

weekender

Full Member
Feb 26, 2006
1,809
2
51
Cambridge
Secondly, don't use you tents pegs as a grill. They are more than likely galvanised steel. This gives off very toxic fumes when heated. Stainless Secondly, don't use you tents pegs as a grill. They are more than likely galvanised steel. This gives off very toxic fumes when heated. Stainless steel is best for cooking over.

That is very sound advice.
 

Badger74

Full Member
Jun 10, 2008
1,424
0
Ex Leeds, now Killala
And clean your boots; and you in the cadets as well, its disgusting :lmao:

I understand your attachment to the parka. I'm attached to my army windproof because of all the pockets so I just have a packable rain coat to go over the top if it rains, or a poncho in camp.
 

kingkio

Member
Jan 19, 2014
31
0
United Kingdom
Just out of curiosity, would buying those cheap disposable BBQ kits that sell for £1-2 around summer and removing the grate for user over a campfire be a good idea? Or would it be better to get something more permanent to use as a campfire grill?
 

dwardo

Maker
Aug 30, 2006
6,271
273
43
Nr Chester
Just out of curiosity, would buying those cheap disposable BBQ kits that sell for £1-2 around summer and removing the grate for user over a campfire be a good idea? Or would it be better to get something more permanent to use as a campfire grill?

They work well. I usually find one that some ejit has thrown in a bush. Infact I had one for multiple trips until it fell apart. Grimp over the edges to make it easier to transport and less pokey.
 

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