My Car Kit

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I was reading the thread Ready made kit for Car travel? & it got me thinking about the kit I carry in my car.

This is the stuff I carry every day, its stowed in our car, either to be forgotten about until needed or used regularly. Anyway, here’s a breakdown of my complete kit. I hope it will provide some inspiration to others & make them a little more prepared or self-sufficient when on the move.

On my Key Chain I Keep:
Res-Q-Me - Orange
LED Maglite Solitaire

In the Glove Box we keep
AA LED Mini Maglite & Lithium Batteries
A Master Keyring (Keep a spare key for every important lock) such as Holiday Caravan, In Laws House etc...)
Swiss Army Tinker Yellow. (Bright Colour makes it easy to find, The blade is great for opening plastic packaging on things I bought, It's also great for removing Zip Ties from packaging to)
A LokSak (9”x6”) (I keep everything above in one of these, it just keeps my glove box tidy)

12v Double USB charger
A USB / Tablet Charging Cable
An iPhone USB / Lightning Cable
A USB Plug (Folding Pins)
A pair of iPhone Earphones
A USB Memory Stick 64GB – Metal
A LokSak (9”x6”) (I keep the above in one of these)

Carpenters Pencil
Fisher Space Pen
Incident Form (I Designed a template printed it off & it lives inside the Notebook)
Sharpie - Black
Waterproof Notebook
A LokSak (9”x6”) (I keep the above in one of these)

240v Inverter (This is stored loose in my glove box)
Satnav & Charging Cable, Fitted
Dashcam & Micro USB Card, Fitted
Res-Q-Me - Orange (This is stored loose in my glove box)

Inside the Main Body of our car we keep:
Hand Crème
Kids Car Blanket with Sleeves x3
Lipsil
Rubber Car Mats
Res-Q-Me x3
Seat Belt Cushion x3 (for back seats) with pocket (we keep the Res-Q-Me’s in this pocket, if our worst fears come true & the car ends up upside down in water, the rear passengers, usually our kids have a greater chance of escaping.)
Small Squirty Bottle of Neat Screen Wash (This lives in the driver’s door, It's great for just lowering the window & squirting the windscreen)
Stick on Rear Window Sunscreen
Stick on Side Window Sunscreen x4
Sunglasses & Case x2 - Adult
Sunglasses & Case x3 - Kids
Windscreen Sun Blocker (These are silver on 1 side & black on the other, they are great for keeping the car cool in the summer)

We have a gap under our back seat we keep a small slim line dustpan & brush (great for sweeping up dirt, crumbs etc. This is also where we store the kids neck cushions when they are not in use.)

Breakdown Bag (This lives in the boot, I know I described it as a bag, however, used to be in a bag now it's stored under the false floor of my boot in a series of holes / bins or where ever it fits really, The only thing that’s definite is that the First Aid Kit is easily accessible & stored on the right hand side. The idea being it’s easy to grab & easy for someone else to grab following our instructions)

Here's the kit:
1 meter of Rubber Tubing x3 (3 different sizes, think repair a radiator hose, fuel line etc.)
A LokSak (I keep the A-Z's in here)
An A-Z Tyne & Wear, Co. Durham & Northumberland (My County, & my neighbouring counties. I have these in case my Satnav decides not to play)
A Pack of Baby Wipes in Ziploc Bag (Helps stop them from drying out)
A BIC Lighter
Bungees (30”) x4
A Can with the Ends Removed (Think a can of coke with the ends cut off, cut the sleeve to make a sheet of aluminium, this makes a great temporary fix to a hole in your exhaust, allowing you to get to a place of safety & get it repaired properly.)
A Compressor - 12v
Cycle Break Cable x2 (used with the Can with the Ends Removed)
Disposable Rubber Gloves x4 Pairs (keeps your hands clean)
A Folding Camp Toilet (Many of us kept a potty in the boot when the kids were small, I've upgraded to this)
A Foot Pump with built in Tyre Pressure Gauge
A Funnel
Heavy Duty Double Ended Screwdriver
Heavy Duty Rubble Bag (Makes a temporary to a smashed window, keeping the weather out)
An Army Issue Folding Entrenching Tool (Useful for digging etc)
A Jack & Handle (Not just for raising the car to change a wheel, This can also be used in conjunction with the Tow Rope to make a winch, giving us the ability to self-recovery if needed)
Jubilee Clips x2 Large
Jubilee Clips x2 Medium
Jubilee Clips x2 Small (These are used in conjunction with the Hoses to make a temporary repair, allowing you to get to a place of safety & get it repaired properly.)
Jumper Cables (For fixing the battery when you accidently leave a light on in the car all night) also learn how to use them, other people may help jump start your car, but they may not know how to do it.
Large Cable Ties x10 (Too many uses to list)
A Large Safety Pin (I use this to clog my windscreen washer jets, If they get frozen, I heat this with a lighter insert it & unfreeze them)
A LED Maglite 3x D-cell & Batteries (a Great Heavy Torch, it makes me feel safer knowing my wife has this in the car;) )
A LED Maglite D-cell Accessory Kit
A Loo Roll in Ziploc Bag
A pair of Pliers
A Poncho - DPM (We put this on then sit on the Folding Camp Toilet, It gives us a greater sense of privacy when tucked behind a bush)
A Can of Rad Weld
RED Glow Sticks x3
Roll of Gorilla Tape (We thought it could be used in conjunction with the Heavy Duty Rubble Bag, listed above)
A Roll of Pedal Bin Bags (Used in conjunction with the Folding Camp Toilet)
A Scraper / Squeegee (we keep this in the driver’s door)
A Small can of WD-40
A Spare Bulb & Fuse Kit (A Complete set, for the vehicle & a few spare fuses to)
A 10mm Socket & Mini rachet (We keep this taped to the box of bulbs, as we need this to replace a headlight bulb, as we found out a few month ago)
A Telescopic Snow Shovel
A Tow Rope (3 Tonne, This can be used in conjunction with the Jack & Handle to make a winch, giving us the ability to self-recovery if needed)
A Tyre Iron (For tightening when nuts,
A Can of Tyre Weld (Fix-a-flat)
A Warning Triangle

Finally, we have the most important breakdown tool we own, we have a membership to a roadside recovery service, (Think Green flag, RAC, AA etc)

First Aid Kit
FAK (First Aid Kit)
BCK (Bleeding Control Kit)
CSK (Chest Seal Kit)
CAT Tourniquet - Orange x2
Neck Collar
Kids Medications

I’ll Make a separate thread about our Car FAK (First Aid Kit) I’ll edit this post & insert the link here when it’s done.

Bail Out Bag
A Whistle
BIC Lighter
Exotac Fire Sleeve
Heavy Duty Tarp (3’x3’) x5 (We use these to sit on, keeping our butts dry & clean, also good for standing on when changing shoes etc)
Hi Vis Vest, Large Kid - Orange
Hi Vis Vest, x2 Adult - Orange
Hi Vis Vest, x2 Kids - Orange (1 for each of us)
Jetboil Flash Stove Complete - Camo (with a full can of fuel)
Jetboil Hanging Kit
Hot chocolate sachets x10
Mora Fire Knife - Orange
Orange Glow Sticks x3
Paracord (100ft - Orange)
Pathfinder Bottle Hanger
Pathfinder Mini Inferno
Pathfinder Waterbottle 32oz, Mug & Lid
Petzl Tikkina Headlamp x5 - Orange (With Lithium Batteries)
SOL Escape Bivvy x5 - Orange
SOL Sports Utility Blanket x2 - Orange
Stackable Plastic Mug with lids x3
Tent Pegs x8
Titanium Spork
Tripod - Mil-Tech
Walking Poles x2
Waterproof Jacket - Adult (just in case one of us needs to get out the car in bad weather)

These items live inside a cheap backpack, so we can grab it if we have to leave the vehicle quickly for some reason.

Additional Winter Kit (We top up our backpack with these items when its colder)
Woolly Hat x5
Gloves x5 pairs
Socks x5 pairs
Flapjack Bars x10

Additionally, we carry these next to items in our car when its colder
Stainless Steel Flask filled with hot chocolate (It takes less them 3 mins to make & is so worth doing before every car journey)
Blanket with Arms - Adult x2

Continued in part 2
 
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Part 2


I’ve started keeping our Kelly Kettle Kit, in the boot too, not for some well thought out reason, like all the other items but simply because I have it so why not, there's no real need to carry it, as we have the jet boil. However, my thinking was it may get used more if we keep it in the car instead of on a shelf in the shed.

This is what I keep in the kit.
BIC Lighter - Orange
Exotac Fire Sleeve - Orange
Kelly Kettle - Basecamp Model
Kelly Kettle - Cook Kit
Kelly Kettle - Cup Set
Kelly Kettle - Hobo Stove
Hot Chocolate Sachets x10
LMF Military Ferro Rod - Orange
LMF Spork & Case - Orange
Pathfinder Mini Inferno

Inside the chimney I keep a stick of fat wood, & fill the rest with dried twigs, That way if I do need to boil water quickly, I'm more or less ready to go. Realistically, it gives me dry tinder & fuel, which will help light marginal twigs.

A few final notes: Our car it is based on what we consider we may need in the worst possible scenario we think could likely be in.

Our scenario is slipping on black ice in winter & landing upside down in water. (Like many on this forum, we do a lot of adventures where this could be an actual event, think driving near a river or pond) We have 3 kids, so with 2 adults in the front, if this scenario ever came true, 1 child will be left to fend for themselves until we get the others out. We thought it prudent to give our rear passengers as much help as we could, hence the Res-Q-Me tools attached to the rear seat belts, Our kids have also been taught how to use them in an emergency, (I hope that day never arises)

Or breaking down on our way home from a day out in the woods, Think no phone signal its dark no cars around & unlikely to have passing traffic until mid-morning the nest day.

The repair kit we carry are for temporary repairs designed to get us to a garage etc…

We are not mechanics nor do we carry spare parts, That should explain why we don’t carry the socket sets, feeler gauges etc that other carry, no point having diagnostic tools that tells you part XYZ is faulty & the tools to remove & replace part XYZ if you’re not carrying those parts or don’t have the skills to replace said parts.

To recap this kit covers the more mundane things like:
An urgency to go to the loo
A Broken Light
A Broken Window
A hole in the exhaust or a loose exhaust
A flat tyre
A dead battery
Being stuck in the mud / Snow
Self-recovery from a ditch
 
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Woody girl

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With all that in the car... how do you find the kids ??? :) :)
Seriously though, looks like you've thought of everything.
I no longer have a car but still have a basic kit on me wherever I go.
Survival blanket torch whistle knife cordage water bottle with water brew kit (hot choc satchet and sugar) minni esbit stove with fuel and lighter and a small steel mug spork Head torch and cheap plastic poncho. Wet wipes and hand gel. Minni FAK.
Somehow I manage to fit this all in my handbag!
I've used most items at least once except the minni esbit stove and brew kit.
Better safe than sorry. You never know when life can get problematic.
I used the emergency blanket just before Xmas when I went shopping in the main town. Due to flooding I got stranded for over two cold dark wet hours. I was the only one at the bus stop not shivering with the wet and cold. That space blanket was a complete godsend.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 14, 2008
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Yet I go out stravaigning with the family carrying little more than waterproofs, just in case of course. You can take a lot or a little. Planning isn't just about knitting up for every eventuality I think but more about having an idea what action needs to be done when really needed. If that makes sense.

Not knocking your kit list for the car. I really need to sort stuff out for the van especially a winter kit. Wish I had that planning drive the op has. I still sometimes wonder what the well planned among our numbers would choose from our gear as a car kit or bug out kit. What the organised people would recommend. I occasionally get so far as sleeping bag each and a flask of stewed tea.
 
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I occasionally get so far as sleeping bag each and a flask of stewed tea.

That's a great start. Now go make a cuppa, sitdown and ask yourself whats the worst case situation that you might realistically find yourself in.
Is it a breakdown on a road with no traffic, how long do you imagine theres no traffic for?
Is it a blizzard that makes you pull over for an undetermind amount of time in sub zero temperatures?
Is it a a local river bursting its banks after you parked down by the river after / during a storm?

Whatever it is, ask yourself these few questions....
1) What items could make the situation impact me less?
2) Is it reasonable for me to carry them?
3) Do I already own these items, or do I need to buy them?

Being prepard to me means: thinking about what could go wrong and taking whatever steps I can to minimise the impact this could have to me and my family.

Is it because we know that sometimes bad things can and do happen to good people? If we think about it is this not the reason many of us have home insurance? simply turn this attitude to your vehicle, would you know what to do if a window on your car was broken and its raining, but your in the carpark in the woods? duct tape and a rubble bag will keep out the rain minimising the effect it has on you. then just take the nest step.

is it realistic to think your car may get stuck in the mud? what would you do to fix this? what could you reasonably keep in the car to help achieve this.
and continue from there.
 

Nomad64

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Nov 21, 2015
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A few final notes: Our car it is based on what we consider we may need in the worst possible scenario we think could likely be in.

Our scenario is slipping on black ice in winter & landing upside down in water......

If carrying all that stuff makes you feel safer and you have got room for it all in you car in your car then great but I really would not recommend your approach to anyone just driving around the UK. TBH you have got more stuff* than I carried in the back of my Landy when I spent three and a half years bimbling around some very remote parts of Africa and the Middle East.

* Not strictly true, I did carry tools, spare parts, a high lift jack and other recovery kit, a satphone and a very comprehensive medical kit but you have stuff on your list that I would never have dreamed of taking. TBH before getting into long range solo vehicle expeditions I spent a lot of time envisaging getting stuck in a river in spate and other potentially dangerous scenarios but rather than bolting on winches and other accessories to get you out of the mire, experience, common sense and effective risk management should avoid you getting into that situation in the first place.

The generally accepted process for effective risk management is not to try to envisage and prepare for the worst possible scenario but to identify potential risks, rank them in terms of likelihood of happening and the seriousness of the consequences and then work out what are the appropriate steps to take to mitigate those risks with the emphasis of addressing those that are more likely to happen and which are likely to result in serious injury or death.

I am sure the statistics will be available but I suspect that in the UK, the risk of drowning in a submerged car is extremely low (and those cases that do could have easily been avoided), but if that is what keeps you awake at night then by all means include seat belt cutters if it makes you sleep easier.

The best first aid kit in the world is useless unless you know how to use it and unless you have up to date training in assessing and managing an accident scene and casualties you risk being more of a liability than an asset.

Trust me, I have nothing at all against self reliance but don’t let “prepping” for every conceivable scenario become an end in itself.

If the risks (real or imagined) to yourself and your young family are causing you excessive worry, most of them could be alleviated with basic kit to keep people warm, hydrated and fed and a satphone (I’ll be selling one one here when I get around to it) or one of the satellite based beacons which let you communicate with the emergency services from anywhere you can see the sky.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/McMurdo-Fa...1578394042&sprefix=Emergency+b,aps,189&sr=8-8

The other thing missing (apologies if I missed it) from you list is an axe or folding saw - I had to clear a tree blocking my drive a couple of weeks ago in order to get home.

Stay safe! :)
 

Woody girl

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My old car wold break down regularly. In one year I spent a total of 14 hours by the side of the road waiting for recovery. Hence no more car!
The one thing I found most important was water. Next a warning triangle, strobing warning light which also pinpoints you easily for the rac or AA or whatever rescue service you use, plus warns other drivers in both daylight and at night..and reflective vest. To be honest that was all I realy needed, though I did carry much more emergency kit with me.
The moors where I live are very bad for phone signal so that was a worry, but I was always lucky enough to break down within signal all but once.
I think the seat belt cutters are a great idea and everyone should have at least one within driver and passengers reach. Being able to break a window from inside the car is also important. Electronic windows and door locking systems can get damaged in an accident.
I knew of someone who drowned in their car after ending up in a somerset roadside ditch due to his windows doors and electricly operated sunroof not operating. Those ditches can be six feet deep in places.
A couple of sheets of cardboard can be useful in winter to help grip in snow and ice and cost nothing to leave behind once rolling.
A car fire extinguisher is something else I always carried right up front with me.
 
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I understand what you’re saying, however this kit doesn't really impact us, apart from the grab bag, the majority is either in the glove box or under the false boot floor in our Antara.

The best first aid kit in the world is useless unless you know how to use it and unless you have up to date training in assessing and managing an accident scene and casualties you risk being more of a liability than an asset.

I agree 100% with this statement, in our case our first aid kit is very comprehensive, and multifunctional. I am a Nurse and work in a busy A & E department, prior to that I was Combat Medical Technician in the Army (think along the lines of an Army Paramedic and you’ll get an idea of this role)

When I was younger a friend of ours did slip and loose traction while driving and his vehicle ended up landing upside down in water, Unfortunately his son who was in the back was unable to escape the vehicle and never made it. That has played heavily in our planning.

We don't have an axe nor a saw, the rational for not carrying an axe is using the tow rope we could drag a tree out of the way far quicker than we could chop through a tree with an axe. The saw I think may be useful, however, I think anything that for us, anything that would help in the situation of a downed tree would need to be like a bow saw, or panel saw and I can't see a way of safely carrying this that wouldn't impact the day to day use of our vehicle.

I understand people may consider this a lot of things in to keep in a car, and if we still owned our Corsa I'd agree with you 100%, however our vehicle is a lot bigger now with a lot more nooks and hidey holes to stow items in, this means the extra kit we now carry is hidden away and doesn’t really impact us.

Most people I presume actually carry a lot more in their vehicles than they think they do. For an example, if you have the time, completely empty your vehicle & leave it as though you were selling it,(might be a good time to get it valeted), list any tools that you leave in the vehicle such as a jack, spare bulb, tyre Iron etc. Now write down each individual item you put back in your vehicle. when your finished you may be surprised at how big your list actually is. This list also serves as a starting point for insurance, say in the unfortunate event your vehicle got stolen.
 
My old car wold break down regularly. In one year I spent a total of 14 hours by the side of the road waiting for recovery. Hence no more car!
The one thing I found most important was water. Next a warning triangle, strobing warning light which also pinpoints you easily for the rac or AA or whatever rescue service you use, plus warns other drivers in both daylight and at night..and reflective vest. To be honest that was all I realy needed, though I did carry much more emergency kit with me.
The moors where I live are very bad for phone signal so that was a worry, but I was always lucky enough to break down within signal all but once.
I think the seat belt cutters are a great idea and everyone should have at least one within driver and passengers reach. Being able to break a window from inside the car is also important. Electronic windows and door locking systems can get damaged in an accident.
I knew of someone who drowned in their car after ending up in a somerset roadside ditch due to his windows doors and electricly operated sunroof not operating. Those ditches can be six feet deep in places.
A couple of sheets of cardboard can be useful in winter to help grip in snow and ice and cost nothing to leave behind once rolling.
A car fire extinguisher is something else I always carried right up front with me.

Exactly, I did want a small fire extingusher up front with me, however, my wife pointed out that we had no where to safely stow it and it would soon become an annoyance, and at that point end up in the boot. That got me thinking, Firstly she was probably right, the Secondly if I keep it in the boot i have to exit the vehicle to go and get it then come round to the fire, given that a fire will be most likely fuel based would my little extinguisher do much or would it be safer to just stay away from our vehicle since we would be out of it incase. We opted for that latter.

Great tip about cardboard for traction, I had just planned on using the rubber car mats.
 
Jan 13, 2018
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Both myself & SWMBO have a McMurdo PLB, she rides (horses) and I hike, both of us in some remote places, and we have a sea-going boat

If you activate your PLB then the emergency services are informed (via satellite) within 5 minutes of your position, who you are and your nearest of kin contact details.

For most of the UK a helicopter can be with you within an hour.

There has recently been a series of "how did they survive" programs on TV, looking at some of the miraculous survival following accidents - last night was a guy who slipped on rocks and his legs became trapped in a 'crack'. He died 9 days later. His diary showed how he had considered cutting off his legs but decided he had a better chance of survival by just waiting it out.
A second example last night was a guy up in the mountains, deep snow, freezing temperatures, he broke his leg. he managed to slither down the mountain on his back and travelled / survived 5 days, he was found 10km from his accident spot and just 1km from his car.

In a previous programme a British guy was on business in Thailand, he decided to go for a walk 'up the hill' behind his hotel and (long story short) got to the top of the hill, got disorientated and followed the wrong trail down, he ended up totally lost and was minutes away from death when they found him a week later.

If they had had a (fag packet sized )PLB they could all have been rescued the same 'afternoon'.

You can simply buy a PLB and register it (and your personal details, free of charge), there are no ongoing costs to ownership and for £100-£200 they are literally a life-saver.
I really don't understand why anyone would venture out into the wilds without one.

The PLB works (and notifies SAR) anywhere in the world, on Land, Sea or Air.

It just sits on my Pack shoulder strap so it is always readily available.

 
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Woody girl

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Car fire extinguishers are meant to deal with car fires ie fuel rather than any other sort of fire. The important thing to remember is not to open the bonnet to use it!!
The sudden rush of air will be disastrous.
I often like to go watch our local fire brigade train in the summer evenings. Got many good tips on dealing with various scenarios just by watching them.
They always do a river recovery training session every winter when the local river is higher than normal. Good fun to watch from the bridge. I've learned a lot from those chaps.
Rather them than me sometimes though. Thank goodness for their dedication. Especially as our lot are retained and not full time.
 

C_Claycomb

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When viewed quickly, Nathan's list looks like it must be excessive (its an unusually long post...so the kit must be excessive ;)) but reading through it is clear that a LOT of the line items are not really all that special. Note book, pens, electronics charger cables, puncture kit and so on. If one goes to that level, well, I know that the stuff I carry and think nothing of would look like a long list too.

Nathan, where abouts to you live/drive? How reliable is your vehicle, and how complicated?

Not wanting to start a debate, but...If the bail out bag is in the car "just in case" all the time, then the Mora may be more of a liability than a worth while aid. The law is clear, "in case" isn't a defense, and the only arguments are what the chances are of running into law enforcement and their choice of action. If we are talking about imagined scenarios, having the knife out while tending your Kelly Kettle at the moment the police pull up to your broken down vehicle could be awkward. If you have thought this through, fine, carry on, I am not trying to change your mind, I am only raising this in case you had not thought about it (because for most of us it would seem a perfectly reasonable kit addition to go with fire/cook kit).

Regarding a bow saw, that might be a good addition if you live somewhere that often sees trees shedding branches onto roads. For safety you can remove blade and either store it in a round biscuit tin, rolled, or make a sleeve from leather or heavy cloth and leave it straight but separate from the handle.

All the best, and thanks for sharing.

Chris
 
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Nomad64

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I agree 100% with this statement, in our case our first aid kit is very comprehensive, and multifunctional. I am a Nurse and work in a busy A & E department, prior to that I was Combat Medical Technician in the Army (think along the lines of an Army Paramedic and you’ll get an idea of this role).

TBH the training and skills you have, a roll of duct tape would probably see you right in the vast majority of scenarios which is useful since with Murphy’s law being what it is, whatever kit you were planning to rely on in a given situation will for some reason be unavailable when you need it. ;)

Don’t lose sight of the fact that your job in A&E is dealing with the results of when things do go wrong, sometimes catastrophically, but those are the exceptions not the norm. :)
 
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Woody girl

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I'm sure your job and training make you more aware than the average person on what can go wrong. You naturally want to protect your loved ones.
My partner was of the ilk that a glove box full of cds we're of more use than any thing else, even when we had a small child with us. Made me very frustrated with him.
There is a happy medium between not bothering and considering every scenario which can be equally annoying to some. Personally I like to be prepared comfy hydrated and warm. Let the rescue services do their job. That said you may have to wait some hours for help so those cds can come in handy for a sing song to keep ones spirits up as long as it's safe to stay in the car. If it's not then they are pretty useless!:)
 
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l
I really don't understand why anyone would venture out into the wilds without one.
Alan, not sure about others, however, for us it sounds a great idea, but the inital financial outlay is just way outside of our buget currently, That's not to say that we wont start allocating funds so we can purchase one, one day.

Don’t lose sight of the fact that your job in A&E is dealing with the results of when things do go wrong, sometimes catastrophically, but those are the exceptions not the norm
Nomad64, Thank you for reminding me of this, as this is something I would bound to fall fowl to, However, since you have made me aware of this, I am able to bear this in mind moving forward.

Nathan, where abouts to you live/drive? How reliable is your vehicle, and how complicated
Chris, I'm in the North East close to the coast, we often go to Kielder Lake / Forrest, we have a Static Caravan in Stanhope in the Pennines, and we are forunate enough to get to play on the west cost of Scotland occassionally, so we go to some remote areas. Luckily our vehicle is fairly reliable, I've only had 1 blown headlight bulb, but replacing the tyres were expensive between £100 - £200 per tyre... ouch. As for how complicated it is well, I can't honestly answer that, I can say I'm not a mechanic, and I don't own any specalist tools, I have changed filters, bulbs, wiper blades and topped up levels and done an oil change. I have replace the Brakes disks / pads, not sure which or if it was both, This was with a mate who is a qualified mechanic and to be honest I done what he said, rather than remembering every exact detail (I won't be attempting this by myself)

I totally get where your coming from RE: UK law and knives.
 
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l Alan, not sure about others, however, for us it sounds a great idea, but the inital financial outlay is just way outside of our buget currently, That's not to say that we wont start allocating funds so we can purchase one, one day.

I picked one up from Gumtree for £30 inc P+P, It has 3 years battery life left not expiring until late 2023. The other was off E-bay and was £35 inc P+P and has 2 years battery life left on it.

New ones have 6 years battery life, and depending on model you can either send them away for a service and new battery (£80) and get another 6 years, or you can buy a battery and replace it yourself.

There is a new one (ex demonstrator) on ebay at the moment £135 buy it now
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/McMurdo-...732208?hash=item3b3f0aa330:g:1gcAAOSwkXdd~229

If you have decided you want one, keep a look out on ebay, Preloved and Gumtree, Friday Ads etc etc.

MAKE SURE you are looking at a 406Mhz PLB and NOT a 121.5Mhz beacon.


Also ensure it is a UK version as other countries have slightly different electronics and would need re-programming to UK specs. (the 406 Mkz part is universal which is why they work anywhere in the world, it is the other 'gubbins' that is country dependent)

Just make sure is says UK or GB on the label.

 
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Paul_B

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 14, 2008
5,161
964
Lancashire
Looking again at the list it's not really as long as it looks. Lots of repetitions but presentation adds apparent bulk to the list.

I glanced expecting overkill so didn't study it, sorry! I personally don't see the risk of as much happening to us. Or perhaps if some things did happen that the op is planning for then we'll not be in as good a place to deal with it. No paramedic, car mechanic, etc. It'll be get out, get help approach.

Perception of risk varies a lot between people. I'm not one of life's preppers. I don't see the risk for serious issues needing it. Or at least the high risk.

With driving I'm generally a safe and aware driver. I've learnt a lot from a driving safety course 6 weeks after passing my test first time at 17 years and 4 months of age. We simply don't go out if weather is serious. Very happy to modify plans to mitigate.

As in all self defence, avoidance of risk better than knowing how to get out of risky situations.
 

reddave

Full Member
Mar 15, 2006
291
15
stalybridge
Did I miss the fuel canister, with fuel ?
in holland, if you run out of fuel on the motorway, there's a big fine
240v inverter ? I hope you're not feeding that from your cigarette socket
 
Paul B, I wish I could have a more relaxed attitude like yours as in ill figure things out when / if something happends.
Since having my kids I've become probably way over protective, Whilst I can't protect my family from every given senario and let them have a quality life, I try to mittigate things as much as possible. If any little niggle or major drama bestows us, I think for a short period life would be tough enough without beating myself up as to why I didn't do something or if only I done XYZ. I think this comes from my friend, while its utterly devistaing losing a child, for may years he felt so guilty that he couldn't save his child. One thing I took from that horrible turn of events was, if something bad happened to me no matter how minor or how serious ... I'd rather have a few items that may help, than live the rest of my life wonding if only I had .... That would eat away at me.

Reddave. I don't carry a fuel can for our vehicle, we ususally keep our car fuel tank full (ish) I remember the fuel strikes a few decades ago, and learnt from that. We always check our fuel before setting off on any journey. (I'd love to sa,y that was ingrained into me from my time in the military, which it is to a degree) but more so, becase we have a petrol station 2 streets away from our home, so its easy to get fuel on our way home. Hence our vehicle is usually full.
Yes the 240 inverter was, but to be fair its obsolete now, Ihavent used it in years so I should really remove it. Its a relic left over from when we used to use the laptop in the car, iPads, iPhones and tablets have made this obsolete now


In general my outlook is sometime bad things do happen to good people, and with Murphys law being what it is, its a safe bet to say sooner or later its going to be our turn. Therefore, when something does happen, I can be part of the problem (Like all those people in America when Katrina Hit asking why noone helpped them or I can be part of the solution and help myself my giving my family the chance to minimise the effect any incident has on us.
 

Hultafors Outdoor knife for Sale

We have a a number of Hultafors Outdoor Knives with Firesteels for sale.

You can see more details here in this thread OUTDOOR KNIVES The price is £27 posted to the UK. Pay via the paypal button below.