Beginners kit list - correction request

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Lonewolf44

New Member
Jan 11, 2017
26
0
Poland
Hello everyone. Im gathering my kit from scratch. Here are the goals:
- Terrain: Northern Poland (seashore, forests, lots of flat terrain, very few hills and wet areas)
- Season: Late spring , summer, early autumn
- Trip duration: 24-72 hours
- Other: I tried to go very minimalistic and simple by, for example, discarding any electronics (apart my phone which i do not consider a kit part)

1. Essentials (held on sturdy leather belt, around my neck or wrist, on me generally)

- Knife (4 inch scandi laminated Helle blade with wooden handle made by me + leather sheath)
- Firestriker (Solo Scientific Aurora worn as pendant)
- Whistle (Helikon, but planning to change as its not really loud enough. Also carried on neck)
- Canteen (Not sure yet, something around 1 liter capacity and made of stainless steel probably)
- Compass (I'd like a simple vintage one, but they are all for display now, so probably some Silva)
- Paracord wristband (Not a fan of "tactical gadgets" but it might be lifesaver if i lose my backpack or something like that)
- Notebook + pencil (Rite in the rain, to write memos about gear along the way. Repair this, change that and so on)
- First Aid Kit (Not sure if i will carry that on me or in backpack. It will contain antiseptic, tape, bandages and compresses, some bandaids, small tongs for ticks, stomach ache pills and painkillers)
- Survival Tin (It will contain stuff for emergency situations which will likely never occur, but better to be prepared. Fishing kit, matches, water purification tablets, signal mirror - generally survival stuff)
- Tinderbox (camera film box stuffed with some good pre-made tinder. Might be consider cheating, but i might not be able to find good dry tinder and be in great need for quick fire one day, so I will carry it)
- Clothes: For now I will be using just normal "civilian" clothes, some cheap hiking shoes - I can't afford quality wool clothing and with good layering I'll go along with cotton garments.
+ might add a Rambone slingshot to the survival tin one day, but thats just an idea for now

2. Backpack - Karrimor Sabre 45. One day I will upgrade to Osprey Aether 70 for longer hikes.
- Sleeping system (DD Tarp, simple foam mat and Snugpak Navigator sleeping bag. No hammock needed)
- Additional clothing set
- Axe (Hultafors Hunting Axe)
- Lunchbox (Zebra 14)
- Paracord (30 meters)
- Sewing kit (BCB probably)
- Sharpening stone (EZE one with wooden plate at the bottom)
- Storm lantern (Feuerhand)
- Personal stuff - Phone, toothbrush, natural soap
- Food and water of course

That would be all I think. Im not really asking for opinions, because kit is very personal, depending on what You do, how You work and stuff like that, so my kit won't probably suit anyone else. Im just asking more experienced guys to check "kit goals" and point out some stuff that I will definitely need, yet didn't mention. Or something to throw away. However, opinions are also of course very welcome. Thank You.
 

decorum

Full Member
May 2, 2007
5,064
10
Warwickshire
Paraffin for feuerhand. Liquid tight container to prevent paraffin leaking into and stinking up, your pack. Container should also be rigid to lessen chance of glass breaking and shredding your kit and then you.

A lighter to light the lantern.

A respirator to wear when the paraffin stinks out your sleep system.

A candle lantern to replace the paraffin lantern.

Soft toilet paper (there are plenty of natural alternatives).

Nappy sacks (for no longer pristine toilet paper).
 

rik_uk3

Banned
Jun 10, 2006
13,320
20
66
south wales
I love paraffin lanterns but...not for backpacking. Your better off with an LED lantern, you'll easily get a weekends light from one set of batteries.
 

Lonewolf44

New Member
Jan 11, 2017
26
0
Poland
Thanks for the replies. So torches are the one and only way of getting light for some possible night camp working? I know storm lantern may not be as handy as a torch but I really wanted to use that instead of electrical stuff. Maybe there are some more expensive lanterns that will pass the test in forest? Im willing to pay a few additional pounds if there are some.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,270
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
I would not take a lantern with me. It is personal of course, but I enjoy going to sleep and awaking the "natural way" when hiking. Saves weight too.
I would add toilet paper and a lighter. If there is a source of water I would add more of water purification tablets and not carry more than in the water bottle.
The water bottle I like are the ones made from plastic, they do not get dented and are lighter.

Summertime I always take salt tablets with me, as I sweat a lot and losing electrolytes is quick with me.

It is very personal what to bring, but I think your list is quite spot on, even for longer trips.
 

Lonewolf44

New Member
Jan 11, 2017
26
0
Poland
Are you walking to camp or driving?

At the beginning I will go by bus and then reach the destination on foot. There is an island close to me, not very remote but apart of summer very few people go there. It is good place for gathering experience, cause if I would have an accident I can walk in any direction for few hours (even without map or compass) and will eventually reach river or sea, safe approach. Later on after getting some skills I will be going off from my family house in a remote village, so technically I will be walking to camp everytime this year. I will also check the lanterns You told about.

If there is a source of water I would add more of water purification tablets and not carry more than in the water bottle.

On 3 day hikes I will be filtering and boiling river water but just as a support supply. Im not experienced enough to not bring any water at all and acquiring 100% in the forest.
About toilet paper - I guess I will be just fine with using natural stuff without getting any scorches. Did that before and it worked out alright.
 

rik_uk3

Banned
Jun 10, 2006
13,320
20
66
south wales
I would not take a lantern with me. It is personal of course, but I enjoy going to sleep and awaking the "natural way" when hiking. Saves weight too.
I would add toilet paper and a lighter. If there is a source of water I would add more of water purification tablets and not carry more than in the water bottle.
The water bottle I like are the ones made from plastic, they do not get dented and are lighter.

Summertime I always take salt tablets with me, as I sweat a lot and losing electrolytes is quick with me.

It is very personal what to bring, but I think your list is quite spot on, even for longer trips.

Turn the lantern off before you go to sleep ?

Sawyer Mini Filter works well and is cheap enough, tablets if you think needed and or bring to a quick rolling boil (above 70c).

Salt tablets? Not really, you should get enough from your diet and water intake for hydration, if your hydrated and eating you don't need a salt supplement...potentially dangerous to advocate this route to be honest.
 

Lonewolf44

New Member
Jan 11, 2017
26
0
Poland
After some discussions Ive decided to drop all the "in case of" stuff. Maybe some day, but on the island ill be starting out even a child would survive with just a knife. Lets update the list. I wanted to highlight that stuff I chose is best I could find for me through reading reviews and scrolling tons of shops. If You know anything better just let me know, cause 90% of the stuff is still not bought. Every suggestion is welcome.

Tools:
1. Knife (Helle Gaupe)
2. Axe (Hultafors Classic Hunter)
3. Slingshot (Rambone 2.0)
Sleeping system:
1. Tarp (DD Hammocks Superlight)
2. Foam mat (Any will do I guess)
3. Snugpak Navigator - right now I have McKinley Laguna (mummy, +8 to +3 degrees comfort zone). Its very cheap but maybe it will do? Or is there a need for better sleeping bag?
Hiking gear:
1. Backpack (Karrmior Sabre 45)
2. Compass (I have no idea what to look for. I just want it to work and withstand abuse)
3. Canteen (Also a bit lost here. Plastic is lighter but stainless will provide additional boiling container and will take much more abuse)
4. Whistle (I will just find something loud, not much to talk about here)
5. Slingshot ammo
Camping gear:
1. Firesteel (Aurora, already bought it and love it)
2. Lunchbox (Zebra 14, I guess its best of stainless out there)
3. Sewing kit (BCB looks nice, but it doesn't really matter as long as there are needles there right, anything will work)
4. Cordage (Probably will start with Paracord, maybe change it later)
5. Notebook and pencil (Rite in the rain should be more than enough)
6. Supplies and personal (Food, water, phone, hygiene stuff)
7. Lightsource (Candles, Lantern, still not sure. We will see)
First Aid Kit:
Antiseptic, tongs, tape, bandaids, compressess, bandages, pain and poisoning meds, surgical strips as I can't suture and its not that easy to learn I guess.

Im dropping clothes for a different topic as its a bigger issue.
 

decorum

Full Member
May 2, 2007
5,064
10
Warwickshire

Bishop

Full Member
Jan 25, 2014
1,621
569
Inside the wire, Llanelli
Depends what the plan of action is...
If the plan is explore a large area or hike some distance then ideally you need to keep the weight down so a candle lantern and a small pocket flashlight or headlamp will suffice. After dark all you should be doing is sleeping and maybe putting the occasional log on the fire.

In a base camp scenario where by day you may be working so camp chores such as cooking, cordage making etc are done after dark and distances travelled are shorter then a kerosene/paraffin lantern becomes a more viable option. The weight trade-off compared to battery lanterns is reasonably favourable, a Feuerhand with 100ml of fuel is about 725 grams and set on low output should run for 12-15 hrs. With a full tank at full brightness you get about 15hrs.

However, battery & LED technology has improved significantly over the last decade and if you shop around it's not impossible to find a lantern with a built in solar or hand crank charger that's both brighter and lighter than a storm lantern. These often have the added bonus of being able to recharge a cell-phone, probably the best piece of survival gear ever created :)
 

Lonewolf44

New Member
Jan 11, 2017
26
0
Poland
Big island then? How would you get on and off?

Just 35 square kilometers. It is connected to sea from the north, and surrounded by river from remaining directions. There is a bridge in south-west and ferry in the north-east corner. There is a small village next to the bridge and a road going between bridge and ferry. Also a small nature reserve there. So the place is tiny, but apart of holiday season walk an hour into the forest and it is completely deserted.

Depends what the plan of action is...
If the plan is explore a large area or hike some distance then ideally you need to keep the weight down so a candle lantern and a small pocket flashlight or headlamp will suffice. After dark all you should be doing is sleeping and maybe putting the occasional log on the fire.

In a base camp scenario where by day you may be working so camp chores such as cooking, cordage making etc are done after dark and distances travelled are shorter then a kerosene/paraffin lantern becomes a more viable option. The weight trade-off compared to battery lanterns is reasonably favourable, a Feuerhand with 100ml of fuel is about 725 grams and set on low output should run for 12-15 hrs. With a full tank at full brightness you get about 15hrs.

However, battery & LED technology has improved significantly over the last decade and if you shop around it's not impossible to find a lantern with a built in solar or hand crank charger that's both brighter and lighter than a storm lantern. These often have the added bonus of being able to recharge a cell-phone, probably the best piece of survival gear ever created

I will be doing both scenarios and swap between them. One time I will try to march as far as I can and keep camping to the minimum, another time I will focus on building a bigger camp with shelter and hike just 3-4 hours a day for fun. However, my first trips will be more like sitting in one place, because like i said the island is a tiny place.
The thing about lanterns is that they would probably not survive my handling. I treat edged tools like babies, but the backpack should be sturdy enough to throw it to the ground and sit on it for a short stop without being afraid of breaking the lantern, so I guess its not an option. I might either go with candles and some heavy duty cover for them + pocket flashlight, or just drop my trapper dreams and bring a head lamp. I won't be marching anywhere after dusk and even so, I wouldn't use any light anyway. Getting Your sight used to darkness works 10 times better in my opinion apart from buildings.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,270
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Turn the lantern off before you go to sleep ?

Sawyer Mini Filter works well and is cheap enough, tablets if you think needed and or bring to a quick rolling boil (above 70c).

Salt tablets? Not really, you should get enough from your diet and water intake for hydration, if your hydrated and eating you don't need a salt supplement...potentially dangerous to advocate this route to be honest.

Well, a lantern is adding weight. A a small fire does provide enough light for basic functions around the camp.
When I am out, I enjoy going to bed just after nightfall, then rise at sunset and watch birds etc wake up.
Salt tablets, if taken as recommended, are not potentially dangerous. It depends how much you sweat, on the outside temp and so on.
If you eat fish and summertime berries snd mushrooms, you need to add salt in some form. Rolling boil for a few minutes is enough, but personally I like to be able to get drinking water without boiling as an alternative.

I forgot to mention that a map is useful too, even on an island that is as small as 6 x 6 kilometers. I like to explore, and maps are good for the initial recon.
 
Last edited:

Lonewolf44

New Member
Jan 11, 2017
26
0
Poland
Describing 35 sq km as 'tiny' is a matter of perspective :lmao: .

Remember Poland has 150% of the entire U.K's area and about 25 million fewer people sharing it ;) :lmao:

Wow I never knew that to be honest... Always thought UK is bigger. However, what I meant by tiny is - standing anywhere on this island, You will go no further than maximum of 2-3 hours of hike until You stumble on some man made structure or water source leading to it, so its impossible to get lost. Also, the forest strip is only around 10km long and 2-3km wide. The rest of island is covered with farming fields. But starting out in western end of the forest, I will navigate just on east-west line and that should be enough for my first bush crafting trips.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,270
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Britain is small, but feels much larger because the roads are overcrowded and slow.
As the forest covered area is quite limited I guess you do not need a map! Learn to navigate by the sun and nature. Can be useful.
Where in Poland is the island? Close to Gdynia?
 

Lonewolf44

New Member
Jan 11, 2017
26
0
Poland
Britain is small, but feels much larger because the roads are overcrowded and slow.
As the forest covered area is quite limited I guess you do not need a map! Learn to navigate by the sun and nature. Can be useful.
Where in Poland is the island? Close to Gdynia?

I already have some basics on that kind of navigation. A compass is all I need there, especially Ive been there few times. Yes, the island is very close to Gdynia. Sobieszewo Island to be exact.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,270
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Looks nice. Not much running water there though? Looks like the ground is sand based and dry. But plenty of farms and houses to get water from.
Do you get any shellfish, mussels and such, on that coastline?
 

Lonewolf44

New Member
Jan 11, 2017
26
0
Poland
Looks nice. Not much running water there though? Looks like the ground is sand based and dry. But plenty of farms and houses to get water from.
Do you get any shellfish, mussels and such, on that coastline?

Both rivers are running at rather slow pace usually. Additionally, there is a refinery rather close, but I'm 100% positive that filtering the water through coal filter and boiling it will make it potable.
Unfortunately, I won't get any wildlife food in this location. Baltic Sea is technically a lake, so there is no seafood at the seashore. Also, considering our harsh laws and the fact there are 2 nature reserves on the island, I would get into huge trouble for any hunting attempts. Setting up snares would probably be a 100-200 quid ticket, and if rangers would find me preparing game I could even go to the court. So for Sobieszewo Island canned tomatoes, nuts and beef jerky gotta be enough ;)
 

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