Dont batton with your knife

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TinkyPete

Full Member
Sep 4, 2009
1,832
68
uk mainly in the Midlands though
I have on occasion batoned with a knife, it is a skill to use when you must. I have broken only one knife a highland mora copy I did it with a frozen knotted piece of pine in Norway, I was tired and wanted to test the knife to it's limit which I did :)
I did get through the bit of wood with a full tang tanto smith and wesson knife which hard work. If you want to test a knife in conditions like that to test the limits I say all well and good, be prepared for the results and have a spare knife :)
I did

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It was a Highlander copy of a Mora Clipper knife and was the new issue survival knife I was testing out. To see what it's limit were. I found them out but the knife has been moved to a survival kit (less handle) but i have made a few stick handles for it, to make it into a full blade again.
 

tsitenha

Nomad
Dec 18, 2008
384
1
Kanata
I do agree with British Red on this subject wholeheartedly. I have carried a hatchet in various lenghts and styles in the bush all my life, even as a pre-teen. He is as you say spot on. Its your knife use it as you want 500m from your car, one gentleman said if I break it well I can always replace it (para phrase) try that 80km+ down some river system see how it works for you.
You would need to use one set of guidelines for 500m and another for deeper woods, I am not that smart I just use one set of rules use the right tools for the job.
Yes I carry a long handled hatchet on my pack and have my pack where ever I go.
The more I know the more I can do with what I have in my pack, but I do carry an appropriate kit.
Apparently after 50+ years in the bush I got it wrong all the way.
 
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Big Stu 12

Full Member
Jan 7, 2012
6,025
1
Ipswich
I do agree with British Red on this subject wholeheartedly. I have carried a hatchet in various lenghts and styles in the bush all my life, even as a pre-teen. He is as you say spot on. Its your knife use it as you want 500m from your car, one gentleman said if I break it well I can always replace it (para phrase) try that 80km+ down some river system see how it works for you.
You would need to use one set of guidelines for 500m and another for deeper woods, I am not that smart I just use one set of rules use the right tools for the job.
Yes I carry a long handled hatchet on my pack and have my pack where ever I go.
The more I know the more I can do with what I have in my pack, but I do carry an appropriate kit.
Apparently after 50+ years in the bush I got it wrong all the way.
I have to say I agree on you all the way, if your knife is the only way of doing things, and you lose/break/damage it, then your stuck... if your more then the a few steps form car park of the campsite away, Saying that that's most of the Bushcrafting that most of us on here get involved in, and most of the nights out will only be for a couple of nights at the most,

Myself 25 years ago or so I used to go away for sometimes weeks by foot and canoe, and not just in the UK, spouse that's where I learnt that an axe for me is an important bit of kit, and still feel that way even though my camping is now with in a short walking distance from the Car..

Also I would imagine that the amount of wood/type of wood you have to process will dictate how and what you use to do it..due to time and effort used/required for other things.

I am not a great fan of tomahawk's but I have to say the size and weight of them and also you don't have to carry the handle with you makes them so versatile. I now have one, and some times pack that as well....
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,175
785
63
Florida
when a knife is the only thing is you have and your out 20-100km from your car or civilation what other choise do you have than using your knife for battone`?
The same choice I have near the car; Don't split any wood. Just burn it as is. If I'm that deep in the woods, why on earth would I pick wood that's so big it needs splitting?
 
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SJStuart

Settler
Jan 22, 2013
998
0
Suffolk Coast
I burned two ~12" diameter cuts of wood last night. I didn't have to split either one of them.

Sometimes I wonder if people are making more work for themselves than is really necessary... just start your fire with smaller wood (twigs, basically) then once you have your fire established throw on some logs. Why split anything for a fire?
 

Teepee

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jan 15, 2010
4,116
3
Northamptonshire
The same choice I have near the car; Don't split any wood. Just burn it as is. If I'm that deep in the woods, why on earth would I pick wood that's so big it needs spliting?
In really prolonged wet conditions, sometimes the only way (and also the most efficient) is to cut a few logs and split them to get to the dry wood inside. It doesn't happen often but when it does its a pain.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,175
785
63
Florida
To be perfectly fair, we're doing this all for fun. If you enjoy the extra work (whether with an axe/hatchet/tommahawk, or by batoning) go ahead and split your wood; using whatever method is fun for you. But it ain't neccessary.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,175
785
63
Florida
In really prolonged wet conditions, sometimes the only way (and also the most efficient) is to cut a few logs and split them to get to the dry wood inside. It doesn't happen often but when it does its a pain.
Or just use the knife to "peel" the wet layers off; the same way I've done countless times with wood fished out of the river. Once the fire is going and hot, just put the wet wood near it to dry out before putting it on the hot fire to burn.

I grew up in (and now live in) areas of swamps. I am very well aquainted with "prolonged wet conditions."