Basic Bushcraft Fishing pt 1

  • Hey Guest, We've had to cancel our 2020 Summer BushMoot PLEASE LOOK HERE for more information.
Yes thanks Woodsmoke. I think you are right about getting too technical, fishing being easier than some make out. I have never considered myself a fisherman, I only fish for food and only ever use 18th century tackle and have never failed to catch fish to date.
Regards, Le Loup.
You're very welcome man. I'd love to try your set up. Simplicity...in style and practice. Marketeers would like us to think there is a difference in what actually works and what they want us to need... ;-) Enjoy. WS
 
i agree... fishing can be simple!

as a child, i used to carry (and use! :D ) a very simple kit, very similar to the one used by le loup... i am still using it today (slightly upgraded, but not much). why? because it works.

don't get me wrong, when i "go fishing" i use the whole modern paraphernalia, but for a "just in case" scenario i need only limited gear to catch a meal. you can see my very basic fishing kit here (from 1:00 to 1:50), as a part of the "bushcraft kit" that i used long before i knew what bushcraft was: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CE1BWpn3t2A

also, you might find interesting my way of scaling fish (even if it's NOT suited for perch and other small-scaled predators ;) ): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XwLUkbSDBTs
 

jeffz

Forager
Apr 4, 2011
141
0
Surrey
For coarse fishing, I like to use poles. Recently found small telescopic poles in Poundland - they fold down to about 12", extending to about 6' - enough reach for fishing ponds and slow-flowing rivers. Using a 1-2ib line, no.20 barbless hooks and light, weighted floats, that rig's been really successful at catching using a bit of flour-paste as bait, and small enough to fit in a pack.

It's a nice way to pass time, and can produce some good campfire meals.
 

Pignut

Full Member
Jun 9, 2005
4,096
12
41
Lincolnshire
folks,

I really want a reasonable small travel rod (that wont break the bank), i have several "standard rods" been fishing for a few years now. but I now only get a few hrs spare time I could devote to fishing, and wanted a really small set up that is easy to fit in my 30m bimble pack.... any ideas?
 

Bushwhacker

Banned
Jun 26, 2008
3,881
5
Dorset
folks,

I really want a reasonable small travel rod (that wont break the bank), i have several "standard rods" been fishing for a few years now. but I now only get a few hrs spare time I could devote to fishing, and wanted a really small set up that is easy to fit in my 30m bimble pack.... any ideas?
Telescopic or take-down?
 

jeffz

Forager
Apr 4, 2011
141
0
Surrey
I've taken a few rudd, a perch and chub. All sub 3lb, but enough. it's all about timing the strike with this rig.
 

mountainm

Bushcrafter through and through
Jan 12, 2011
9,990
9
Selby
www.mikemountain.co.uk
Rudd reputedly doesn't make good eating although it is farmed in some parts of europe. In british freshwater stick to minnows, gudgeon, eels, large perch, pike, trout and zander. Tench are also supposed to be worth a try.

A good book to reference is Roger Phillips & Martyn Rix
Freshwater Fish of Britain, Ireland and europe.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/0330286900/ref=redir_mdp_mobile
 

jeffz

Forager
Apr 4, 2011
141
0
Surrey
Rudd reputedly doesn't make good eating although it is farmed in some parts of europe. In british freshwater stick to minnows, gudgeon, eels, large perch, pike, trout and zander. Tench are also supposed to be worth a try.

A good book to reference is Roger Phillips & Martyn Rix
Freshwater Fish of Britain, Ireland and europe.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/0330286900/ref=redir_mdp_mobile
It's all relative - most freshwater fish are bony (as in having many, fine bones). Rudd and roach aren't great eaters, but quite palatable. Carp, perch and pike are delicious, though.
 

mountainm

Bushcrafter through and through
Jan 12, 2011
9,990
9
Selby
www.mikemountain.co.uk
It's all relative - most freshwater fish are bony (as in having many, fine bones). Rudd and roach aren't great eaters, but quite palatable. Carp, perch and pike are delicious, though.

Carp sometimes need to be purged (like snails) before eating as your mileage can vary considerably based on their diet and habitat. Never tried them myself, just heard bad things.
 

jeffz

Forager
Apr 4, 2011
141
0
Surrey
Carp sometimes need to be purged (like snails) before eating as your mileage can vary considerably based on their diet and habitat. Never tried them myself, just heard bad things.
True enough. Only eaten carp caught in large bodies of water. Not sure I'd be 100% about one from a murky little pond... The flesh is good, but lots of fine bones for such a (potentially) large fish. Great steamed with garlic, shallots, coriander, ginger and a bit of soy.
 

Kepis

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 17, 2005
6,302
1,179
Sussex
True enough. Only eaten carp caught in large bodies of water. Not sure I'd be 100% about one from a murky little pond... The flesh is good, but lots of fine bones for such a (potentially) large fish. Great steamed with garlic, shallots, coriander, ginger and a bit of soy.
You never did say if you had the permisson of the water/land/fishery owner to remove and eat fish from his/her lakes?, without consent of the water/land/fishery owner it's poaching?
 

pilotlight

Member
Jan 7, 2012
49
0
Northumberland
some interesting info on fishing here, well done.

In Poland the traditional christmas dish is carp, eaten on Christmas Eve, the main reason Poles were harassed for fishing and taking carp out of lakes. Bit earthy for my liking.

we used to go 'tickling' fish in our youth, my dad taught me, although I was not up to much.
 

copper_head

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Feb 22, 2006
4,261
1
Hull
This is a great thread, thought I'd share a little on imitation baits, they work very well and are a good addition to your fishing kits. Only work on a float or feeder method though. Anyway here's a perch I caught on imitation red maggot.

DSCF0830.jpg

Excellent thread w00dsmoke