Wild Stove’s Wood gas stove MK II

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DS1150

Tenderfoot
Jul 27, 2010
61
0
London
A really thorough review mate. I did a YouTube review on here months ago. I think they are great stoves. I'm glad others are discovering how useful they are. I think they're great for some simple entertainment whilst camping, feeding the flames and watching the jets.
 

RobD

Member
Jul 30, 2012
17
0
Deep in the forest
Thanks for the review. Really looks good. My only hesitation is the cost. A bit cheaper and I'd have got one by now. £50 for me is a big shell out so really want to feel the majority consensus is that it is worth the money.

Is it worth the expense - aware of a few others cheaper than this (honey stove etc) so want to be sure it is worth it. Any thoughts anyone.
 

Andy BB

Full Member
Apr 19, 2010
3,290
0
Hampshire
Brilliant review!!! I really like these stoves, great design!!
Just a quick question if you don't mind please.
Of you wanted to Cook on a stove like this but use a lower heat, or even maybe simmer something, is that even possible to do on a wood burning stove?
I have always thought that you could wait till you have coals and do it that way but from what I have read im not so sure now!!
Thanks
Steve
With the Emberlit, you "feed" it from the side with long pieces of wood. You can limit the heat by withdrawing bits of the fuel. or just breaking off and leaving the charcoal "ends" in. And because the wood you can feed can be fairly large, you get decent charcoal/embers too.
 

Andy BB

Full Member
Apr 19, 2010
3,290
0
Hampshire
Compared to the biolite its pretty good. A fill of pellets burned great. the downside is that it generates a massive amount of heat underneath and the fuel falls through the grate to the floor. Andybb put a silicone heat mat underneath it and it destroyed it completely and left a good patch of scorched earth. burned a long time though :D
Yup - all weekend pretty much, on a bag of kitty litter!
 

jacko1066

Native
May 22, 2011
1,689
0
march, cambs
With the Emberlit, you "feed" it from the side with long pieces of wood. You can limit the heat by withdrawing bits of the fuel. or just breaking off and leaving the charcoal "ends" in. And because the wood you can feed can be fairly large, you get decent charcoal/embers too.
Thanks for that!!
I may just have to keep an eye on the classfieds to see if a wood gas stove comes up!!
Is there much of a difference between the mk1 and mk2?
I have got a honey stove but I quite like using that with a meths stove but also having the option of using wood if need be!
Cheers
Steve
 

Andy BB

Full Member
Apr 19, 2010
3,290
0
Hampshire
One of the biggest benefits of the wildgas stoves is that it'll burn for over an hour on a fill of wood-pellets. However, as it is heavily dependent on the airflow from underneath, you really need to clear the ashes after every pellet burn, otherwise it just sort of gutters out -you can't just pour another load of pellets in on the embers of the old lot. But seeing aws it only takes a couple of seconds to tip out, its not a deal-breaker!
 

bert333

Full Member
Jan 15, 2008
697
5
Earth- for awhile longer...
Does anyone have this stove AND a Bushbuddy to do a comparison?
This Wild stove seems to allow ashes to fall straight through :( (not so good in my book as I prefer to leave no trace) whereas the Bushbuddy is sealed.
The BB also is way lighter too.
Anyone? I'd be very interested
cheers
(nice review btw !)
 

Andy BB

Full Member
Apr 19, 2010
3,290
0
Hampshire
The woodgas stove seems much more stable to me - wider base and better pot-holders. (I was a bit worried that the pot-holders might be a bit fragile, but they seem to be standing up well so far, and haven't read of any falling off!) I'm guessing the underside ventilation on the Wildstove has helped in keeping the stove relatively low, as opposed to the bushbuddy/bushcooker where its narrower but taller.
 

Andy BB

Full Member
Apr 19, 2010
3,290
0
Hampshire
Not any more. I did have a bushcooker (a sort of bushbuddy clone) for a while, but sold it. I think the wildgas stove is a better piece of kit, to be honest.
 

bert333

Full Member
Jan 15, 2008
697
5
Earth- for awhile longer...
based on what Andy? I have the bushbuddy and just wished it was a little larger\wider !
hence my hope to get someone to compare them. Any one got the Wild one in Kent I could come and see?
 

Andy BB

Full Member
Apr 19, 2010
3,290
0
Hampshire
Based on stability, both for the unit itself, being wider, and the pot stand again giving a wider base for the pans.
 

Lyope

Tenderfoot
Sep 6, 2012
75
0
London
www.lyope.com
I posted this on another forum that I use, but I thought you might like to read my thoughts on the one I bought...

A place in Twickenham (Funky Leisure) had them for sale at £49.95 and I popped down to have a look at one and to see if it would fit into one of my camping pots. It did, so I bought one.

So here's what you get:










A good fill of twigs:






Some smaller stuff and some paper:



Touch a match to it...






Within a couple of minutes, the woodgas catches:






After about twenty minutes (unless you feed it more fuel), you end up with this:



I did feed it some more and kept it burning for about an hour. Here's the aftermath:



Pure charcoal :)



The verdict? This thing knocks my home made stove into a cocked hat. Seriously, it's smaller, lighter, cleaner and focusses the heat that much better.

But wait - there's more...

I was wondering whether there was a way of fitting a Trangia burner into it. This is the stove with my Tatonka Trangia-pattern burner (same diameter, but stainless rather than brass and has a bigger reservoir).



You *can* just use the upper half of the stove as a pot support and put the burner on the ground like so:



...and the simmer ring works like this:



With a pot on it, you get something like this:



It works well enough - the burner's a little low maybe, but it's not bad. My only criticism of the stove design is that the fold-out pot supports don't go to the horizontal, so you need a big pot to cover them all for maximum stability. You *can* use a smaller, bushcraft-style pot, but it won't be as steady.



You might want to put the whole thing on a sturdy base - like this:



You might also consider a windshield if you're on meths:




Pondering the issue of how to raise the meths burner to a slightly higher position, I had an idea. Don't you just love it when things fit together this well?




(Julian hardly ever uses her granny ring these days, anyway :D)

Now you can see where the burner (and simmer ring) sit when the top goes on:




There's even enough airflow that I can use this sturdy sheet ally windshield as a pot support, like this:






So there you have it. A kick-bottom, lightweight, top-lit, gassifying wood stove with added bikey goodness. A meths burning option for when you don't want to scrub the soot off your pan.

It all nests together into the first pot in these photos, along with the windshield and the burner. I'm going to knock up a nice little pair of soot-proof fabric drawstring bags for it all and give it a thorough testing on my first tour with it next week.
 

salad

Full Member
Sep 24, 2008
1,777
131
47
In the Mountains
Having seen Andy's running all weekend at Rough Close I have to admit I'm quite impressed with this little fellow.

The more I see the more tempted I get.
Hi Wayland

Go for it I say, I brought one quite a while ago and I have to say its the best wood stove I have ever used, I used to have a bushcooker wood gas stove and found this good for boiling water but for cooking proper food it was a bit of a pain as the main chamber is quite small and needs re-filling quite a lot, The wildstoves woodgas stove on the other hand is excellent for cooking up a proper meal from scratch .
The main compartment is big enough to hold decent sized bits of wood which helps with burn times, I carry mine in an evernew 1300ml ti pot when I am hiking. But if am just heading out to camp in one location I use it with my Primus 2.9ltr billy (which I believe is the same billy can you use Wayland). I have cooked a good stew in this large billy using the woodgas stove before.

Treat yer self I say :)

Heres a photo for you with the primus pot for scale :)



And packed in my smaller hiking pot



Packed pot in hand for scale photo :)

 
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