Whole Chicken in a Can

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TeeDee

Full Member
Nov 6, 2008
5,880
554
46
Exeter
Yes .I am a food snob and Yes i will be passing on this.

More for everyone else i guess.
 

Hammock_man

Full Member
May 15, 2008
1,237
249
kent
So where do I get one from these days.

P.S. I have tried a whole nut in a can but felt short changed !
 

aarya

New Member
Oct 5, 2006
32
0
38
Norway
I`d rather eat a chicken in a can, than a burger at any of the fast-food places. Atleast with the chicken in the can, you can see that it wasn`t previously a rodent of some sort.
 

Tengu

Full Member
Jan 10, 2006
10,907
473
47
Wiltshire
I think its fantastic.

Think of the delight of your guests, when miles from any fridge (or chicken farm) you conjour up a roast dinner.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,699
1,780
S. Lanarkshire
My big brother was a medical student at Glasgow Uni, Mum never knew who, or how many folks, were invited for dinner.

It's easy nowadays to buy and store food, anytime, any season, any variety; it wasn't then.
Modern houses may well have had pantries, but they weren't as cold as those built underground or with running water in them, freezers were tiny wee things that kept a half dozen ice lollies at the top of the fridge, not entire meals.

Tinned chicken, ham, salmon were just in case standbys.

Pasta ? well that was spagetti or macaroni, wasn't it ?......only fit for childen's lunch, not dinner.

Rice was for puddings, maybe kedgeree, or occasionally folk might *try* a mild curry.

And dinner was always at least three courses, especially if there were guests.

No microwaves, so no quick cook food.

Remember too that there weren't the huge chicken batteries either, chicken was expensive, when the butcher had them in.
If Mum bought fresh it was usually a capon.........more meat, and better flavoured it was believed.
I think we had more rabbit than chicken tbh. until the myxie took them.

Different times, and these tinned chickens were part of it.
I think Eric's right though, might be useful for camping so long as you don't have to lug it very far. Soup or stew and roast chicken too :)

cheers,
Toddy
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,699
1,780
S. Lanarkshire
I don't think so, it was a council house, but then 80% of the population lived in council houses :dunno: My grandparents lived in sandstone cottages g.grandpa had built however.
It was a kind of very practical household though :D
Always folk in, always company, always something being made :cool:

cheers,
M

p.s.
Hear, why don't the Cyrenians breed organic capons ? They're better fowl all round for eating iirc and I don't see them in supermarkets; niche market maybe ? Don't need steroids like those poor excuses for Christmas turkey?
atb,
M
 

locum76

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Oct 9, 2005
2,772
9
43
Kirkliston
Hear, why don't the Cyrenians breed organic capons ? They're better fowl all round for eating iirc and I don't see them in supermarkets; niche market maybe ? Don't need steroids like those poor excuses for Christmas turkey?
atb,
M
TBH, there's just not enough minutes in the day. Might be on in the future though, the idea is to graze fowl in the orchard when the trees have matured a bit.

For now theres a chap (also called Rob) who runs a company called 'All Year Round Birds' by Harperrig Reservoir who could do you a capon.
 

HillBill

Bushcrafter through and through
Oct 1, 2008
8,113
57
W. Yorkshire
Did you know that the first ever canned foods were chicken in a can? They were issued to French troops during the penninsula wars ( Napoleon, Wellington).

The Goddamns (us) were happy soldiers indeed whenever they got hold of the crapauds (them) supplies. Garlic sausage, tinned chicken etc. Much better than the barrels of dodgy beef we used to issue.
 

Tadpole

Full Member
Nov 12, 2005
2,842
20
56
Bristol
Did you know that the first ever canned foods were chicken in a can? They were issued to French troops during the penninsula wars ( Napoleon, Wellington).

The Goddamns (us) were happy soldiers indeed whenever they got hold of the crapauds (them) supplies. Garlic sausage, tinned chicken etc. Much better than the barrels of dodgy beef we used to issue.
Almost right, the first 'canned food' were in glass Jars. The French invented the method of preserving food, now called canning, but the ‘cans’ were glass jars, rather than metal. The metal can as a method of preserving was invented by an English man Peter Durand 1810 less than a year after the french.