Whole Chicken in a Can

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Chinkapin

Settler
Jan 5, 2009
746
1
79
Kansas USA
Khruschev, in his memoirs stated that he became quite fond of Spam during WWII when it was often the only meat that was available. I think there is a television advertisement there just waiting to be filmed.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,699
1,780
S. Lanarkshire
That used to confuse me no end :dunno:
Why do they call bottling 'cannning' ??

Good recipes from N. America for it though :approve:

cheers,
M
 

Tadpole

Full Member
Nov 12, 2005
2,842
20
56
Bristol
That used to confuse me no end :dunno:
Why do they call bottling 'cannning' ??

Good recipes from N. America for it though :approve:

cheers,
M
I think that the term can is the shortened form of canister, which can be made of anything, the French invention called for preserving of food, within a glass cylinder or canister. Before Paster they thought that removing the air would preserve food, so they heated the glass canisters to drive of the air. Preserving food by sealing it in glass canisters is canning
 

HillBill

Bushcrafter through and through
Oct 1, 2008
8,113
57
W. Yorkshire
That used to confuse me no end :dunno:
Why do they call bottling 'cannning' ??

Good recipes from N. America for it though :approve:

cheers,
M
Americans like to use different words than we do. They wanted to distance themselves from us after the war of independance as much as possible so a whole new set of names for things came up. They even drive on the right because we drive on the left, no other reason. Where as the French drive on the right because napoleon was left handed.

canning/cannisters is probs correct though.
 

Chinkapin

Settler
Jan 5, 2009
746
1
79
Kansas USA
Why do you call it a "tin" when there is no tin in it? (interestingly enough, we refer to an empty one as a "tin can" but no one would think of saying get me a tin can of soup or get me a tin of soup - - just get me a can of soup.)

I expect HillBill is right when he says that canning probably evolved from cannister. the word "can" most likely came the same route.

Its true that after the Revolution, we did distance ourselves from the British, such as judges not wearing wigs, dropping the "u" of of words like "harbour" etc. But by the time automobiles came along I dont think this had anything to do with it.

Some people theorize that horsemen preferred to pass left side to left side, because it is much easier for a right handed person to pull his shotgun and wheel around to the left in his saddle. Much more difficult the other way round.

But I think the real reason is that in the era of Henry Ford, cars were being built with both left hand and right hand drive, and Henry simply said he was going to build them with the steering wheel on the left period.

Since he built the vast majority of cars, everyone else soon fell into line. It had more to do with Ford being stubborn than it did with colonists and descendants of colonist being pig headed.
 

rik_uk3

Banned
Jun 10, 2006
13,320
20
65
south wales
Why do you call it a "tin" when there is no tin in it? (interestingly enough, we refer to an empty one as a "tin can" but no one would think of saying get me a tin can of soup or get me a tin of soup - - just get me a can of soup.)

I expect HillBill is right when he says that canning probably evolved from cannister. the word "can" most likely came the same route.

Its true that after the Revolution, we did distance ourselves from the British, such as judges not wearing wigs, dropping the "u" of of words like "harbour" etc. But by the time automobiles came along I dont think this had anything to do with it.


Some people theorize that horsemen preferred to pass left side to left side, because it is much easier for a right handed person to pull his shotgun and wheel around to the left in his saddle. Much more difficult the other way round.

But I think the real reason is that in the era of Henry Ford, cars were being built with both left hand and right hand drive, and Henry simply said he was going to build them with the steering wheel on the left period.

Since he built the vast majority of cars, everyone else soon fell into line. It had more to do with Ford being stubborn than it did with colonists and descendants of colonist being pig headed.
I though the spelling was to do with making English easier to learn and write for the mass immigration at that time?
 

Bravo4

Nomad
Apr 14, 2009
473
0
50
New Mexico, USA
I heard that alot of the spelling changes were due to a guy named Webster. He's responsible for changing 'colour' to 'color', and a few others;)
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,699
1,780
S. Lanarkshire
Why did he not just write it culor then ?
You know for a stranger, English in all it's permutations, must be a nightmare to spell :rolleyes:

cheers,
Toddy
 

Tadpole

Full Member
Nov 12, 2005
2,842
20
56
Bristol
I heard that alot of the spelling changes were due to a guy named Webster. He's responsible for changing 'colour' to 'color', and a few others;)
Webster felt that English was too hard a language for Americans to learn read and write in, so he invented word (some twelve thousand of them) that the American children were able to comprehend, rather than try and 'over' educate them with Greek, Latin and Anglo-Saxon word based words and grammar, though his speller included quite a few of all types. During his life time he was respected, but not by educators. I feel that this is because his elementary spelling books for children, were never joined with a spelling book for adults.
 

HillBill

Bushcrafter through and through
Oct 1, 2008
8,113
57
W. Yorkshire
Some people theorize that horsemen preferred to pass left side to left side, because it is much easier for a right handed person to pull his shotgun and wheel around to the left in his saddle. Much more difficult the other way round..
Before cars were invented people walked/rode on the opposite side of the road to their sword arm as to always have the weapon between them and someone coming the other way. The majorty have always been right handed so the majority of travel was done on the left of a road. Napleon was a leftie so had his whole armies march on the right.

You know, i never thought of shotguns etc with americans, and now that i do it makes complete sense. European history goes way further back than American history (post colonisation) so swords were the norm. Thanks, thats given me a new take on things over there. :)
 

Wallenstein

Settler
Feb 14, 2008
753
0
42
Warwickshire, UK
Why did he not just write it culor then ?
You know for a stranger, English in all it's permutations, must be a nightmare to spell :rolleyes:

cheers,
Toddy
When I lived in Hanover I used to ask my German friends to read this sentance aloud:

"The rough, tough, dough-faced ploughman coughed and hiccoughed his way from Slough to Loughborough".

Very few got it right first time. :)

If I was really feeling mean I'd unleash this monster on 'em:

Dearest creature in creation
Studying English pronunciation,
I will teach you in my verse
Sounds like corpse, corps, horse and worse
I will keep you, Susy, busy,
Make your head with heat grow dizzy.
Tear in eye your dress you'll tear,
So shall I! Oh, hear my prayer,
Pray, console your loving poet,
Make my coat look new, dear, sew it!
Just compare heart, beard and heard,
Dies and diet, lord and word,
Sword and sward, retain and Britain.
(Mind the latter, how it's written).
Made has not the sound of bade,
Say said, pay-paid, laid, but plaid.
Now I surely will not plague you
With such words as vague and ague,
But be careful how you speak,
Say break, steak, but bleak and streak.
Previous, precious, fuchsia, via,
Pipe, snipe, recipe and choir,
Cloven, oven, how and low,
Script, receipt, shoe, poem, toe.
Hear me say, devoid of trickery:
Daughter, laughter and Terpsichore,
Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles.
Exiles, similes, reviles.
Wholly, holly, signal, signing.
Thames, examining, combining
Scholar, vicar, and cigar,
Solar, mica, war, and far.
From "desire": desirable--admirable from "admire."
Lumber, plumber, bier, but brier.
Chatham, brougham, renown, but known.
Knowledge, done, but gone and tone,
One, anemone. Balmoral.
Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel,
Gertrude, German, wind, and mind.
Scene, Melpomene, mankind,
Tortoise, turquoise, chamois-leather,
Reading, reading, heathen, heather.
This phonetic labyrinth
Gives moss, gross, brook, brooch, ninth, plinth.
Billet does not end like ballet;
Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet;
Blood and flood are not like food,
Nor is mould like should and would.
Banquet is not nearly parquet,
Which is said to rime with "darky."
Viscous, Viscount, load, and broad.
Toward, to forward, to reward.
And your pronunciation's O.K.,
When you say correctly: croquet.
Rounded, wounded, grieve, and sieve,
Friend and fiend, alive, and live,
Liberty, library, heave, and heaven,
Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven,
We say hallowed, but allowed,
People, leopard, towed, but vowed.
Mark the difference, moreover,
Between mover, plover, Dover,
Leeches, breeches, wise, precise,
Chalice, but police, and lice.
Camel, constable, unstable,
Principle, disciple, label,
Petal, penal, and canal,
Wait, surmise, plait, promise, pal.
Suit, suite, ruin, circuit, conduit,
Rime with "shirk it" and "beyond it."
But it is not hard to tell,
Why it's pall, mall, but Pall Mall.
Muscle, muscular, gaol, iron,
Timber, climber, bullion, lion,
Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, and chair,
Senator, spectator, mayor,
Ivy, privy, famous, clamour
And enamour rime with hammer.
Pussy, hussy, and possess,
Desert, but dessert, address.
Golf, wolf, countenance, lieutenants.
Hoist, in lieu of flags, left pennants.
River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb,
Doll and roll and some and home.
Stranger does not rime with anger.
Neither does devour with clangour.
Soul, but foul and gaunt but aunt.
Font, front, won't, want, grand, and grant.
Shoes, goes, does. Now first say: finger.
And then: singer, ginger, linger,
Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, and gauge,
Marriage, foliage, mirage, age.
Query does not rime with very,
Nor does fury sound like bury.
Dost, lost, post; and doth, cloth, loth;
Job, Job; blossom, bosom, oath.
Though the difference seems little,
We say actual, but victual.
Seat, sweat; chaste, caste.; Leigh, eight, height;
Put, nut; granite, and unite.
Reefer does not rime with deafer,
Feoffer does, and zephyr, heifer.
Dull, bull, Geoffrey, George, ate, late,
Hint, pint, Senate, but sedate.
Scenic, Arabic, Pacific,
Science, conscience, scientific,
Tour, but our and succour, four,
Gas, alas, and Arkansas.
Sea, idea, guinea, area,
Psalm, Maria, but malaria,
Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean,
Doctrine, turpentine, marine.
Compare alien with Italian,
Dandelion with battalion.
Sally with ally, yea, ye,
Eye, I, ay, aye, whey, key, quay.
Say aver, but ever, fever.
Neither, leisure, skein, receiver.
Never guess--it is not safe:
We say calves, valves, half, but Ralph.
Heron, granary, canary,
Crevice and device, and eyrie,
Face but preface, but efface,
Phlegm, phlegmatic, bottom, glass, bass.
Large, but target, gin, give, verging,
Ought, out, joust, and scour, but scourging,
Ear but earn, and wear and bear
Do not rime with here, but ere.
Seven is right, but so is even,
Hyphen, roughen, nephew, Stephen,
Monkey, donkey, clerk, and jerk,
Asp, grasp, wasp, and cork and work.
Pronunciation--think of psyche--!
Is a paling, stout and spikey,
Won't it make you lose your wits,
Writing "groats" and saying "grits"?
It's a dark abyss or tunnel,
Strewn with stones, like rowlock, gunwale,
Islington and Isle of Wight,
Housewife, verdict, and indict!
Don't you think so, reader, rather,
Saying lather, bather, father?
Finally: which rimes with "enough"
Though, through, plough, cough, hough, or tough?
Hiccough has the sound of "cup."
My advice is--give it up!
 

HillBill

Bushcrafter through and through
Oct 1, 2008
8,113
57
W. Yorkshire
The English language has always been a pain to learn if your not from over here. It is even harder to write. I would have loved to see their faces trying that lot out :lmao:
 

clcuckow

New Member
Oct 17, 2003
795
0
Merseyside, Cheshire
Why do you call it a "tin" when there is no tin in it? (interestingly enough, we refer to an empty one as a "tin can" but no one would think of saying get me a tin can of soup or get me a tin of soup - - just get me a can of soup.)
The orignal metal cans (and a lot still are) where 'tinned' e.g. the inside (as can the outside) of the can is plated in a thin layer of tin to prevent rust.
 

Carbuncle

Forager
Jan 12, 2009
105
0
51
Merseyside
Before cars were invented people walked/rode on the opposite side of the road to their sword arm as to always have the weapon between them and someone coming the other way. The majorty have always been right handed so the majority of travel was done on the left of a road. Napleon was a leftie so had his whole armies march on the right.
I've got an archeology journal at home from about 10 years ago, and it had an article on a Roman era quarry in the south of Endland somewhere. Anyway, what was of interest was that they were driving on the left back then. They could tell this because the road was metalled or paved, and the ruts were shallower going to the quarry because the carts were empty.

As far as I remember - which may not be correct - the gist of the article was that, even back then, and under Roman rule, we were opposite to the continent, which would be interesting if true, and imply a much earlier, even ancient, origin. I'll try to dig the article out.
 

HillBill

Bushcrafter through and through
Oct 1, 2008
8,113
57
W. Yorkshire
I've got an archeology journal at home from about 10 years ago, and it had an article on a Roman era quarry in the south of Endland somewhere. Anyway, what was of interest was that they were driving on the left back then. They could tell this because the road was metalled or paved, and the ruts were shallower going to the quarry because the carts were empty.

As far as I remember - which may not be correct - the gist of the article was that, even back then, and under Roman rule, we were opposite to the continent, which would be interesting if true, and imply a much earlier, even ancient, origin. I'll try to dig the article out.
http://www.2pass.co.uk/goodluck.htm

Here is an article on it.
(sorry for the thread deviation)
 

Matt.S

Native
Mar 26, 2008
1,075
0
32
Exeter, Devon
The orignal metal cans (and a lot still are) where 'tinned' e.g. the inside (as can the outside) of the can is plated in a thin layer of tin to prevent rust.
Mild steel sheet plated with tin, often known as tinplate. Today it's often electro-plated but in the past it was hot-dipped. Some people claim that 'tin cans' were originally made of tin but it would be too soft and quite expensive. Many 'tins' now are plated with cadmium or zinc, or coated with plastic on the inside. We now have the linguistically interesting concept of 'tinnies' of drink, which are aluminium (which in itself is an interesting word).