Waxed canvas haversack / breadbag

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tombear

Full Member
Jul 9, 2004
4,364
408
52
Rossendale, Lancashire
Hi folks
I've still not learned how to use a sewing machine and in any case the canvas was so tough the needle had to be pushed and pulled through through with pliers, so this sucker is all hand sewn, in very heavy linen thread, back stitched where the seam isn't visible on the out side and saddle stitched where it is like on the strap. No excuses for the uneven stitches but this is a user so strength was more important than beauty!

I looked about the interweb at commercial and home made examples and adjusted the design to my own requirements and size ( tall and very fat but getting less so in the lard department I'm happy to recount ), The strap is 58 inches long as opposed to the 47 on a certain well known commercial example as it is to go over some bulky clothes in winter as well as me and it's obviously easier to make it shorter with a pin or two than longer as required.

h4UJsoN.jpg


The bag itself is 16 inches long with a 8 inch flap/ pocket and 12 inches wide.

DIDkl6E.jpg


If needed I'll add Xs of saddle stitching where the straps attached but it seams very strong as is and in some places I was stitching through 6 layers of army surplus canopy grade waxed canvas and my hands hurt like blazes from just doing the squares of stitching you can see!

The bags like a lopsided market wallet with the smaller half forming the flap.

HkNBujh.jpg


Rather than use pins I used impact adhesive to hold it together during stitching. It's powerful stuff and would probably done the job on its own.

With a suitable sewing machine it would have taken 10 minutes start to finish but ended up taking three long evening sessions. I highly recommend Maun smooth, parallel jawed pliers for the stitching as they do not chomp up the needle and make it difficult to draw through the cloth ( a chavelled up needle can also wreck the threads its passing between). I got through 4 of my dwindling stock of pre 1960s high quality needles making this thing the stitching was that difficult.

Finally I wet the stitching and got it to shrink some to tighten up the thread.

I realised i needed something for gathering dry twigs etc that was strong and light and could be washed ( I can always re proof it if required) Its main use will however be as a ration bag to go along side my tarty Helikon Tex essential kitbag which doesn't have the capacity to hold a full days snap and a pair of leather gloves. If I want to carry more I can use a satchel or some such but I wanted a minimalist option.

I may add a eyelet or loop of paracord to clip the gloves to in the flap but doubt I'll add any other buckle or closures'

ATB

Tom
 

JonathanD

Ophiological Genius
Sep 3, 2004
12,679
1,267
Stourton,UK
Jayzus, that’s some commitment doing that stitching by hand I’m not adverse to sewing through thick stuff but that’s some great work and patience.
 

tombear

Full Member
Jul 9, 2004
4,364
408
52
Rossendale, Lancashire
Cheers! I cunningly hid the wobbliest bits of stitching out of sight. Once, we'll twice , i hand stitched a lined calf length cloak at 8 stitches to inch which took weeks and I thought I was cheating not doing 12. Masochist? Who me?

At least this one will get used, a lot of my sewing has just hung in suit bags full of moth balls for 12 years or more!

Atb

Tom
 

Brizzlebush

Full Member
Feb 9, 2019
282
169
Bristol
You may think it's untidy, that depends what we compare ourselves to, we are our own worst critics, no?
I think it shows some serious dedication and perseverance, producing a fine item.
Nice one!
 

tombear

Full Member
Jul 9, 2004
4,364
408
52
Rossendale, Lancashire
Yeah, it's always the same with me After a couple ofdays I dont see the iffy bits so long as they dont actually affect the use.

Anyroad, since the weathers picked up we are off for a bimble tomorrow so I've just baked a batch of 5 inch diameter almond and sultana bannocks to carry in it as trail rations. Just had one to check they are up to scratch.

3 heaped cups of self raising flour
1 heaped cup of oat flakes
1 cup of full cream milk powder
1 cup of flaked almonds
1 cup of almond powder
1 cup of sultanas
2 tablespoons of sugar
1 tea spoon of salt
1 heaped table spoon of baking powder

Mix

Rub in 3 table spoons of whatever shortening you prefer, I used veg oil this time.
Add enough warm water to make a not too sticky dough, flatten on a floured board to about 1/2 a inch thick, cut about 9 x 5 inch diameter rounds . I put three each on floured baking trays and put them in a pre heated to 180C oven for 20 mins, checking after 15 and swapping shelves and turning them 180 degrees. I used a dry brush ( I forget the right name for them, for brushing egg white or whatever on to the tops of bread or buns , a glazing brush? ) to remove the flour after baking .

Rather nice hot with butter if I say so myself.

I'm going to make a bunch of beeswax cotton wraps at some point, ween myself off clingfilm for wrapping stuff for days out. Not sure how big to make them or what weight of cotton will be best.

Atb

Tom
 
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tombear

Full Member
Jul 9, 2004
4,364
408
52
Rossendale, Lancashire
Cheers!

Last night I rather pointlessly made a heavy waxed canvas roll top case to take my shiny new ultra light weight Evernew 570fd mug and lid ti gas stove and a couple of sizes of gas canister. I could stick in a folding spork and some means of igniting the stove.

Anyroad I used up some scrap pieces of canvas hence a extra seam, recycled the webbing strap and buckle and the seams are either back or saddle stitched with very heavy linen thresd, the old school stuff for repairing tents or saddlery.

20210924_134836.jpg

Since its rather on the robust side I'll probably use it for storage mainly. With hindsight I should have made it long enough to take the M'kettle since the case for that is a bit flimsy.

ATB

Tom
 
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fingertrouble

Tenderfoot
Sep 6, 2021
64
43
48
London, UK
I'd have to ask my Dad who indeed used to have to repair boating canvas/sails, but I think it's some really good or butch sewing machine with a big needle....certainly not your normal domestic needle anyway!
 

Mesquite

Anyone for sailing?
Mar 5, 2008
25,319
1,321
60
~Hemel Hempstead~
(I too wish I could sew - I never was taught and wish I had access to a sewing machine for clothing repairs)
I was never taught how to sew or use a sewing machine but I did learn through simple trial and error.

As for a sewing machine keep a look out for when Aldi has them on sale. I've heard good reports about them being a good starter machine.
 
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tombear

Full Member
Jul 9, 2004
4,364
408
52
Rossendale, Lancashire
No body taught me either, they tried at school but failed miserably. You just need to be persistent and it will come easily enough. I still have to get my head around machines but I've now cleared a space to use the one I have been given and just need to make time.

It's a greats skill to develope and will save you a lot of money. Elderly reltaions are a good source of kit they don't use anymore as were charity shops. Be careful, over second hand machines unless you have some one who can check they are set up properly or your good with machines yourself. Manuals are usually available online.

Try and start off doing as small stitches as you can, it took me a while to get out of doing too large ones and the strength and neatness increased no end when started to do under 8 stitches to the inch.

Kit I've found to be really worth having.
Smooth jawed pliers
Lots, and I mean lots of bead headed pins
Tailors chalk pencils blue and white for light and dark cloth.
Old needles if you can find them, bending needles are frustrating and can put you off projects.
Needle threader , easy enough to make from fine, springy wire if you can't find any.
Good light.

ATB

Tom
 

fingertrouble

Tenderfoot
Sep 6, 2021
64
43
48
London, UK
No body taught me either, they tried at school but failed miserably. You just need to be persistent and it will come easily enough. I still have to get my head around machines but I've now cleared a space to use the one I have been given and just need to make time.

It's a greats skill to develope and will save you a lot of money. Elderly reltaions are a good source of kit they don't use anymore as were charity shops. Be careful, over second hand machines unless you have some one who can check they are set up properly or your good with machines yourself. Manuals are usually available online.

Try and start off doing as small stitches as you can, it took me a while to get out of doing too large ones and the strength and neatness increased no end when started to do under 8 stitches to the inch.

Kit I've found to be really worth having.
Smooth jawed pliers
Lots, and I mean lots of bead headed pins
Tailors chalk pencils blue and white for light and dark cloth.
Old needles if you can find them, bending needles are frustrating and can put you off projects.
Needle threader , easy enough to make from fine, springy wire if you can't find any.
Good light.

ATB

Tom
What I never understood is how you stop it unravelling? That didn't seem obvious to me, and not something I could easily learn from trial and error.
 

tombear

Full Member
Jul 9, 2004
4,364
408
52
Rossendale, Lancashire
Some types of stitching don't unravel easily ( more in a moment ) but without classic running stitch a.. you do is periodically go back on your self for one or two stitches. Rather than rely on the knot I also do this at the start of line.

Saddle stitch locks itself as the stitch on the opposite side prevents the broken one on the other side from unravelling but in case both stitches get broken I periodically back stitch to stop any break getting bigger. Saddle stitch is the one that looks like two lines of running stitch that cross over using the same holes.

Another way of finishing a line of stitcnes is to, on one side, usually the inside if there is one, pass needle and thread underthe exposed stitches for several stitches so the thread is trapped underneath them.

My favourite stitch is backstitch where you go two spaces forward on one side and one stitch back. You end up with a continuous line of stitches on one side and a double line on the other. So every stitch is locked in place. Once again i periodically go back and stitch over it to reinforce the line.

As clear as mud no doubt.

Atb

Tom
 
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