Ski trip footwear - inexpensive options.

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Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,004
441
Lancashire
EHIC card is good in EU countries emergency. I have holiday insurance with full adventure sport/ winter sport cover including recovery by helicopter if needed. Real bells and whistles cover. Really not expensive so worth getting.

I claimed off holiday insurance this summer when van broke down and we missed a ferry for a cycling tour. It refunded taxi charge each way. We always get good cover that's independent from bank accounts and other sources of "free" cover.

Of course as beginners we're very cautious so hopefully no need for medical help. Although our son has no fear or sense. He tends to go straight down the slope as fast as he can. I'm the idiot who has to follow him. My more experienced skier partner won't change her skiing style for anyone. It's a slow, zigzagging path. If anyone's going to have a painful accident it'll be me trying to keep up with our son!
 
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Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,004
441
Lancashire
He'll turn 7 just before this trip. Last year in ski school they took them up to the longest slope in the resort, a green. At the steepest part near the end they stopped them to tell the kids to follow the instructor on a slow and steady zigzag. Our then 6 year old son was at the back, took one look at where the teacher was taking them then obviously thought "stuff this!" The instructor looked round to see him cutting through the zigzag and heading straight down the steep part almost as fast as the expert skiers who joined that section from one of the hardest routes there. He must have got down and had to wait several minutes until the group got down.

Part of me thought he should be told off but the greater part thought it was all good stuff. Seriously can't criticise him for enjoying it and doing his own thing. Independence is something that's being taught out of kids at times I think. If our son breaks a leg it's horrible but just another life lesson.

Like his broken arm from falling off his bike. He was too cocky and lucked out. He just got up and carried on riding. It's his nature to hide how bad an injury is or even hiding it completely. We got him home and after he finally said it hurt badly whilst one handed eating his fish and chips and watching tv. We decided he needed A&E. Green stick break just above his elbow. A few weeks with a cast then like nothing had happened.

Has he learnt? Hello no! He's still doing stunts at school cycling classes, racing kids 3 or 4 years older and looking anywhere that grabs his attention instead of where he's going.

Speed skier? We ski for 1 week a year, well we've only skied once week ever! That's not enough to become good enough.
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,131
1,286
McBride, BC
We didn't get any more than 6" new snow in the night.
Cleared off to the east. No colder than -5C, the snow brushes off like sugar.
Of course, it's soft enough to compact with any aggressive knobby boot tread pattern.
My shoes have very fine sipes in the tread, good for when this mess gets compacted and a bit slippery.
If my feet get at all cold, it's into my clod-hopper snowmobile boots for real comfort and warmth.

Like I said, ice is ice and slippery all over the planet. Around my house, I'll scatter
volcanic pumice grit or sharp sand for the sake of safety.

I'm running Firestone Alpine winter tires (legal requirement) on the Suburban.
They're wonderful but I still have to pedal it to get away from a stop sign.
I might shift into 4X4 just to be certain everything is working (shift on the fly) but
don't do anything stupid and 2-wheel drive is just fine.
That tread pattern on a walking boot might be quite good.
 

Billy-o

Native
Apr 19, 2018
1,116
426
Canada
Our then 6 year old son was at the back, took one look at where the teacher was taking them then obviously thought "stuff this!" The instructor looked round to see him cutting through the zigzag and heading straight down the steep part almost as fast as the expert skiers who joined that section from one of the hardest routes there. He must have got down and had to wait several minutes until the group got down.
Maybe. Check in with yr kid Paul. Not saying he's not the next Jean-Claude Killy, but he could just have been out of control and couldn't stop. You see it a lot on the greens, and people will laugh it off .. but then maybe get reluctant to ski again. It can be scary. Luckily kids are very resilient, but confidence can take a shake.

We taught ours to ski early and it is very much a communal experience with lots of parents and you see lots of examples of kids taking to it or not depending. I know a few kids here here who've grown up disliking skiing because of bad tumbles or being pushe d a bit far a bit soon .. .much to the chagrin of their proud skibunny parents
 
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Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,004
441
Lancashire
No, he's the stubborn sort so would not have gone skiing again if he didn't like it. Trust me, he loved it and was in control. I followed him, scared and barely in control, but once caught up a bit I called him to stop before the point where harder pistes cross. He stopped dead on when he wanted.

I'm not saying he's a natural or a talent, just that when he wants to learn a new sport he does just that. Plus I think he has the thrill seeking I had when younger. I took to whitewater kayaking. He's taking to skiing. Must admit, the adrenaline is similar IME. You get nervous before doing a new run, doing it you start to relax, the difficult bit comes up and you're closer to your skill limit. You get the fight reflex I guess where things happen slower or your reactions speed up. Total concentration. Then it's over and toy get to relax and look back where you've come from with a high feeling. Skiing for this novice is like that just like a grade 5 rapid when I was a good kayakers.
 

Billy-o

Native
Apr 19, 2018
1,116
426
Canada
Glad to hear that, Paul. Skiing is such a 'lifestyle' thing here, kind of sickening, and its a real trophy for some kinds of parent to have kids that ski well. Mainly to fit in with holiday plans. Thank your stars that your kid doesn't want to get into competitive downhill. The expense is unbelievable. Thousands on classes and different sets of skis, then there's getting to the competitions (usually that means flights, hotels) .... There's lots of rich people here, mainly indolent, largely uncultured - I mean don't read or go to the ballet etc. - (and weird as it sounds, that isn't being snobby - this city is very isolated for a place that likes to think of itself as a metropolis) - but anyway there's not much to do that isn't outdoorsy - there are also redneck and hoity ways of doing such things, much like at home - so there can be pressure on the kids not to disappoint on the boards
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,131
1,286
McBride, BC
Best international trade show destination for snowmobiling is around the village that I live in.
280 sleds went through the Renshaw check point gate this morning (to sense if your beacon is transmitting.)
Tricked up, those sleds are $25,000 - $35,000 each. Belle and Lucille would have added another 400 sleds.
Very trendy in just the last few years to have a Pieps beacon and wear an Avalung. Will not guarantee your survival.
Just makes your body easier to find before the wolves dig you up. Free lunch.

Four Heliski companies fly out of my village.
At least $1,000/day and booked solid for years to come.
Especially the Mexicans! Stunning luxury. 100,000' vertical guaranteed.
Owner guides, tries to ride 1,000,000' vertical every year.

Footware: Merrell has hooked up with Vibram for their "Arctic Grip" rubber soles meant for shoes on wet ice.
I have not seen these but I am seriously interested.
 

Billy-o

Native
Apr 19, 2018
1,116
426
Canada
I know a few sled mechanics .. at least that is one of the several jobs they hold down ... and on occasion they'll haul me along and let me use a loaner. Donuts in an abandoned carpark with 6' of snow ... the simplest, most mindless of sheer pleasures :) especially with a squealing kid on the back. One of these maniacs shattered his lumbar a few years ago taking a sled off a 60' cliff. He's still at it though. :)
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,131
1,286
McBride, BC
The big shop is only a block away. They scream down my back alley at 80 mph testing and I don't care.
The basic deal is that if you can't boost a hot run at 90 mph, you can't out run an avalanche, even if you see it coming.
NOX refills? no problems.
We all hope that sledders ride safe. They are getting much better for beacons and flotation.
We can predict who dies = age, home, location and lifestyle. How sad is that?

I got out my sled boots last night. 12-16" fresh snow in the village.
I'm in the city. 2'30" on a good day on hwy 16 winding through the mountains to get home tomorrow.
This last snowfall (15-40cm) has made a winter wonderland of the place.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,004
441
Lancashire
After xmas. Must be one of a rare few who looks forward to the day after boxing day more than xmas day itself. It's the second year of ski holidays. But I've got two birthdays and visiting two sides of the family to get past first.

Funny how we used to look forward to xmas then afterwards was a let down. Plus lead in to new year and back to work went quickly. Now the week after xmas is a week of new experiences and places. Fun all the way through.

Last year was our son's first time in a plane. We were worried he'd be scared being just 6yo. He absolutely loved it. Wants to fly every holiday. As we took off coming home he spotted a factory with a lot of smoke coming out of a stack. Obviously mentioning a fire when taking off in a plane isn't a good thing for everyone within earshot.

The thing about skiing is how if you're brought up in a country where there's a lot of snow and skiing you're likely to be skiing as soon as your walking. Seeing kids 4yo taking the bumps with clean air and no poles is amazing to me. Seeing a woman without sticks flying out of a gap in the woods edging the nursery slope, landing and skiing down the slope as if that's as simple as walking, is amazing. She had very long and thin skis, x country I reckon. She was fast and controlled.
 

Billy-o

Native
Apr 19, 2018
1,116
426
Canada
It is worth spending a few days early on skiing w/o poles ... kind of lets you know how to sit your shoulders and how small tweaks in posture change how you move on the snow. They are too useful in other ways to abandon entirely. Nuts as it may seem learning to ski on one leg and how to ski backwards are all useful skills to pick up as early as you can.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,251
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
I started x- country at about 5, downhill much to late, at about 7.
Parents were pure x- country skiers, ( narrow speed skis and wide trekking skis) is the reason. In those days, we started learning downhill without the poles. To turn, stop, how to hold the skis together, the lot. On a very shallow run. Then progressed to poles and steeper runs.

But, I am sure the teaching technique has changed tremendously, so best to follow that.

I checked, and there is an Intersport shop in Åre. Has mainly winter sport equipment of course, but should have some bushcrafting stuff.
There is also a shop with construction stuff, they usually stock knifes from Mora. The superbly cheap professional ones.

I do not remember if you tried and x-country skiing in Norway?
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,004
441
Lancashire
Only had time to learn how to ski down a green slope badly but fast, or felt fast to me.

Skiing on one ski! Done that. Did a jump just before a bend with a big potential for an uncomfortable fall down a steep slope through trees and brush. I had to turn with the weight and edge on one ski. Possibly my best bit of skiing the whole trip! :)
 

Billy-o

Native
Apr 19, 2018
1,116
426
Canada
About this time of year, well a few weeks ago, I do some leg exercises in anticipation of the season.

Go on the elliptical machine, set it to steep and do half an hour. Give yourself hell. Loud music will help. Then work out a little routine for your legs paying attention to your glutes ... get a 50/60 lb bar and put in 60 squats, go on the leg press, another 60 (120lb+ with your glutes and core tight), then do 60 rep with the hamstring and quad machine, do a bunch of reverse lunges (watch your knees, forward lunges are a pest for that), ten big deadlifts, some single leg romanians, some side lunges, some pliés and some side abductions for your hips, and the equivalent adduction. Do some pressups too, in 20s, for tightening up.

You likely won't walk the next day:lol: I know I don't. But, if you can do that once every three days, by the third time you will have bulletproof and super strong legs. It'll affect your core too, especially if you can manage to do something light like a bit of a yoga or a swim in the off days. You'll notice your posture change and your time on the snow will be so much more fun. It'll have you standing upright on your skis ... which makes ALL the difference. It is medicine, but good medicine.
 
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