Ski trip footwear - inexpensive options.

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Billy-o

Native
Apr 19, 2018
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Canada
Haglofs are OK .. not top end specification, but entirely serviceable and OK at their pricing across the range of things they make. In fact I have a couple of light weight jackets from them which are pretty good. Their shoes are made by Asics still, I think. So, if your foot fits their lasts, you are good. I have had a couple of pairs of approach shoes from them for example, and would buy more. I am fickle there though.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
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Lancashire
Back when I heard of them they didn't have an English language site and didn't sell direct.

Looks decent stuff. There's Michelin winter rubber compound and a newer winter compound. Both available with and without tungsten carbide spikes. There's even versions with removable spikes that fit into the sole. Bugweb.

I've seen Michelin winter compound on other winter shoes. Iirc Columbia use it too in their winterised footwear. I know Michelin do some decent grip bike tyres for winter.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
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Haglofs are OK .. not top end specification, but entirely serviceable and OK at their pricing across the range of things they make. In fact I have a couple of light weight jackets from them which are pretty good. Their shoes are made by Asics still, I think. So, if your foot fits their lasts, you are good. I have had a couple of pairs of approach shoes from them for example, and would buy more. I am fickle there though.
Decade ago they had a more higher end rep in hiking circles. Certainly their high end waterproofs were similar prices to archeopterix (sic) from Canada at the time. Their LIM range was well received for lightweight fans. I think however they've gone sprayway way. If you understand me, cheaper and towards mass market street wear. Their primaloft style synthetic insulation jackets look more high street than outdoor imho for example.
 

Billy-o

Native
Apr 19, 2018
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Canada
I am thinking Meindl (Borneos or something) and Yaktrax as the sanest most flexible option. But -15C is hard on the tootsies. Big toe especially, I find. Maybe a special 900-fill tiny toe bag for that particular niche.

Add gaiters and you is ready .... nothing worse in the world than that feeling of a lump of snow sneaking in to the back of your boot.

You'll be able to snowshoe too
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
A good way to prevent snow getting into the footwear is to wear the trouserleg over the boot.

all these high tech footwear, the stud thingy I recommended earlier, all this is fine.
But, what about footwear that are developed in the north, for northern people?
Back to basics?

Those you can wear in UK too, no problem!

https://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0geKI.9xtJdbGAAHgRXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEydm9kOWxtBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDQTA2MDdfMQRzZWMDc3I-/RV=2/RE=1574123326/RO=10/RU=https://www.kero.se//RK=2/RS=fq3jBqfiDeX0llV7QvZ54eynM14-


( Sorry, it is in Sweden.........
:) )


I wore a pair like this most of my 'off time' when I worked in the force, and all of the Saame troops wore them also in the forces.

The 'beak' is to use on skis, but the additional benefit is that you have plenty of room to move your toes, good for the circulation!

Man, I want a pair again!!!!!!
 
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Billy-o

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Ah! That's great .. curly toed Sami shoes is for the ski binding ... how could I not have worked that out myself :lol::)
 

Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Saame binding tech: one loop of twisted leather.
You stick in your boot, hook it.
Two skis, one pole.
I learned that technique for fun. Very, very difficult.
Then a Norwegian invented the modern binding and people could start enjoying skiing!
 

Billy-o

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Apr 19, 2018
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Often see people using that technique here and, on the lift, when you press them on the subject, they all turn out to be old scandinavian fellas. There was one such who saw me struggling with an 80s telemark rig and showed me how to actually enjoy it. Still see him quite often on the local hill. He sometimes used a single pole and gave me a go .. though usually he was a backcountry skinning up hero type. Historic, rustic and charming, I thought, but you are kidding me, right? :lol:

I don't think it is going to snow here this year, not properly. Very annoying. Drove up to pick up my pass earlier in the week ... not exactly still daisies in the meadow, but not far off it.
 

Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
I have used several binding systems, and felt the oldfashioned toe-cage and cable behind the heel was the most versatile when skiing (x-country) in virgin snow or on previously skiid tracks in the mountains.
 

Woody girl

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Mar 31, 2018
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Exmoor
I know you say £100+ is too expensive but I got a pair of boots from rohan 2 yrs ago. They were in a sale so I got them a bit cheaper but they are still going strong.I only use them as winter boots in the UK though I did buy then for a trip to sweden in January. (Flew to Are so same area)
They were fine even on compact snow and ice. I walk with a stick and felt very safe, even without ice grips. In the UK I always used the grips before I bought them.
For me they were a great investment.
I also took a cheap pair of snow boots that were about £18 from mountain warehouse. They were supposed to be fine at -20 but they weren't! Had to put in extra insoles to insulate my feet. Thank goodness I'd gone 2 sizes bigger! had the grip though. But they were the half wellie type you don't like. Personally I'd rather have warm feet and have slightly uncool footwear than be fashionable with cold feet.
 
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TLM

Settler
Nov 16, 2019
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Vantaa, Finland
The curly toe can be used for skiing, it is not very easy though, on the other hand that was the only type of binding used in the Winter war so ...

I think it is partly decorative, maybe

I have long boots with a toe like that, mostly for show off.

My next binding will be of a ffairly new type with a cup at toe and a spring catch at the heel, one just steps into it. Fits almost every boot.
 

Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
My advice, Paul, would be - if you go into arctic cold, do not save on equipment.
Specially not on footwear.
Buy the correct quality items and they will last you for many winter trips, be it Fenno Scandinavia, the Alps, or anywhere else you plan to go skiing!!

Winter shoes sold in UK are for mild British winters, not Scandinavian winters.
Just my 2p.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
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Lancashire
Is Are going to be arctic cold? Iirc its only a little north of geilo last year but inland and possibly colder. Last year it wasn't even -10°C and ended up +4°C. Not good with the last skiing day having the snow practically down to gravel. Although geilo was expected to be -10 to -15°C at that time I think.

I've walked in -15°C in the UK believe it or not. Did it in fell shoes too. One time I forgot one sock so I had one cold foot and one snug foot. The sock i forgot was a reproof one too. Needless to say I didn't last long on the walk and was off the hill defrosting after an hour of it.

You don't mess around with cold. I've had frost nip, beginnings of hypothermia and chillblanes due to mistakes with kit. I've learnt the hard way over the years. One hypothermia case was a whitewater trip when air temp was -5°C or so. I'd left my neoprene pogies on the car roof I only had nylon pogies as a spare and only one hand too. So I didn't wear anything and the wind chill left my hands like claws. Not good when you need the feel for paddling Rapids. I ended up taking a spill towards the end but with less than 10 minutes to the egress I never warmed up and needed help getting out of the boat and out of the wetsuit into dry clothes on my upper body to warm up.

I know enough to back out of situations due to cold. I'm naturally cautious despite my history of more entertaining outdoors sports.

I could just make do with what I have. Plenty of warm socks and boots big enough to take extra socks. I buy the thickest and warmest British hiking socks for UK hill use in winter, two up should be good. Thermo innersoles too. It's really the grip issue for me that makes me want to get snow boots of some variety.
 

Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
It is a little bit colder on the Swedish side. Hopefully it will be a nice temperature, maybe -5C or so, when you are there!

Average temp in December is about -6C, maybe a degree or so colder at the end of December.

-6 is still nasty with bad shoes, if you stand still and watch your child play!
Two woolen socks, still leaving toe wiggle room, should be plenty warm!

Do not worry about slipping. If you find Åre pavements slippery, you will be able to find those slip on thingies locally.

My guess is that all pavements are cleared, sanded and salted daily!

In worst possible case, the Swedish healthcare is very good, and the Åre doctors well practiced in making casts and splints,
:)
 
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Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
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At least we're still in eu for the trip so health card works. Without getting into politics I did worry about that because it could have been cancelled for us. We always get good winter sports holiday insurance but EHIC gets you through the gap between emergency treatment and sorting out the insurance I believe (never needed it for medical treatment).

In Norway it was grit and gravel in the snow, ice and slush. If I slipped in that gravel rash on the hands. Of course glove wearing was important too. I've got nice dachstein mitts. Toasty warm last year but needs a layer of ice crust to be truly wind proof I believe.

If -6 is typical then I'll be ok with current footwear except for the slipping. I think I've got good balance and don't slip when I've got confidence in the footwear. When I have doubt I slip a lot. Good grip shoes I'll be ok running, switching to poor footwear I'm crawling along the walls in dodgy places. Not quite that bad but you get my gist.
 

Billy-o

Native
Apr 19, 2018
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Canada
I think I've got good balance and don't slip when I've got confidence in the footwear. .
:lol: A couple of years ago, I was with my son walking across the carpark at the local slope. We bumped into this guy, no one we knew, and were just chatting about nothing. It was late, dark, but the paths were pretty OK and we were weren't thinking at all about walking, just bowling along in the usual manner in soft, trampled snow. He had his gloves and helmet in his hand and was fiddling about, so he put his helmet on his head whilst he sorted his gloves. Two steps later he slipped. His feet shot up in the air, came up about to eye level, and he landed pretty much directly on his head. It would have been hospital time but for the fact he'd just put his helmet on.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
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Lancashire
Playing British bulldog at primary school I once did something similar. I launched sideways into space. I seem to remember I got higher into the air than waist height, possibly shoulder height then landed on the side of my hip and thigh. I think my shoulder took a hit too but I got up after I realised I was on the ground and walked it off much to the amazement of anyone who saw it. I was probably 10 at the time and the bruise lasted ages.

That was a patch of ice that lasted to the end of winter but I the risk was worth it to avoid getting caught.

When it catches you out so unexpected you're on the ground before you've realised you've slipped I reckon.