How do you start your fires?

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wildranger

Need to contact Admin...
Oct 29, 2011
112
0
Ireland
Ocean1975, I'll see if I can get a video up on youtube or something next time I practice the hand drill for you.

The hand drill may be easier in arid climates but it is still possible to achieve a high rate of success in temperate forest zones with the right materials and enough practice under your belt. What's more, native peoples could have worked in pairs or teams to produce fire using the hand-drill which makes it much, much easier. I don't know much on the exact history of friction firelighting methods in various parts of the world, whether the bow-drill came to replace the hand-drill in europe as a firelighting tool or not, or when that happened if it did, so if anybody has information on this to share it'd be fantastic to know the answers to these questions.

The hand drill to me, is a lot more satisfying due to its simplicity in having just two components and not requiring any cordage which is time-consuming to make. It's a more compact and lighter system for travel and its reliability depends on the skill level of the user, so it has the potential to be just as reliable as the bow drill. After mastering the hand drill, you would choose it over the bow drill any day and I feel it's a skill worth mastering, even if that takes over a year of regular practice. I'd love to get to that point, where I can have as much confidence in a hand drill set as I do in a box of matches. The floating technique, in my opinion, is definitely the way forwards to making the hand drill a truly reliable firemaking tool, just my 2 cents on the matter :D
 

zeon98

Forager
Feb 3, 2012
226
0
essex
I use hex blocks to. Depends on how much time I have to play. Carry a fire steal too and use that with cotton wool or shavings but after a long walk I mostly just was to eat fast!
 

cbr6fs

Native
Mar 30, 2011
1,620
0
Athens, Greece


Or

 

roybmx

Member
Jan 25, 2010
15
0
Japan
I usually use a fire steel with lint from the washing machine. I have used a bamboo fire saw a couple of times too.
 

BillyBlade

Settler
Jul 27, 2011
748
2
Lanarkshire
Zippo lighter and a hexi block.

That way I have plenty of time to get on with the important things in life. In the main, getting my brew and my dinner prepped.

Broad church this buchcraft thing, isn't it :D
 

Stringmaker

Native
Sep 6, 2010
1,891
1
UK
But this wasn't as a firemaking tool, this was as a drilling tool..firemaking using bow drill was much later.

You seem very sure of that, can you reference the evidence?

Personally I don't think it's impossible for both methods to be in use at the same time, albeit in different parts of the world
 

pauljm116

Native
May 6, 2011
1,457
5
Rainham, Kent
Thanks for that, it was interesting and you made it look easy. I think I need to spend more time preparing and have a bit more patience. Next time Im out will have another try, Im determined to get to grips with this now so thank you.:)


As promised... Hope its of some use! Just some basics as requested.

[video=youtube;ldTSpYQjmz8]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldTSpYQjmz8[/video]
 

Compo Semite

Member
Feb 7, 2012
23
0
Wales
A diesel soaked rag and a couple of plastic bottles...Only joking! usually a fire steel a ball of cotton wool and a candle stub, lighting the candle stub from the cotton wool and then whatever natural tinder and kindling is available if the weather is dry I'll use cramp balls and wild clematis down and fibres.
 

GST138

Tenderfoot
Feb 21, 2007
65
0
49
North Yorks
Yesterday took me a long time to get a fire going. It is vey cold and damp here in N. Yorks. But had a go with my new flint and steel and Fire piston. Got embers very easily with char cloth, harder to get this to take as I only had a bit of brch bark, adn damp twigs. Eventually used cotton wool and char cloth and got it going. Still happy to get the fire piston to work outdoors.
 

pauljm116

Native
May 6, 2011
1,457
5
Rainham, Kent
Yesterday took me a long time to get a fire going. It is vey cold and damp here in N. Yorks. But had a go with my new flint and steel and Fire piston. Got embers very easily with char cloth, harder to get this to take as I only had a bit of brch bark, adn damp twigs. Eventually used cotton wool and char cloth and got it going. Still happy to get the fire piston to work outdoors.

Ive often wondered about fire pistons. How easy are they to get an ember going?
 

GST138

Tenderfoot
Feb 21, 2007
65
0
49
North Yorks
with Char cloth it was very easy to get the ember going. The fire piston takes a bit of practice but once you have the hang of it it is very easy. I was struggling with getting from ember to flame. I know this was my lack of preparation with a tinder nest but I wanted to use only what I could gather and that was very little.
 

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