Fear of the dark

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ReasonSharp

Member
Jul 29, 2015
10
1
Croatia
@C_Claycomb, awesome, thanks. I suppose I've never considered it because the woods I've mostly traveled in were tame and I picked nights with plenty of moonlight. If I ever go to places likely to have bears, lions, or other large wild animals, I'll be sure to procure one of those.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,711
991
64
Florida
Or leaning on JonathanD’s older tale in this thread, take a stash of pistachios with you. The odds against there being TWO pistachio eating serial killers in the area are astronomical !!!
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,676
1,629
McBride, BC
There is a variety of apex predators here. Makes solo camping a tactical mistake, whether you prefer a tent or a hammock.
The smaller ones, the Lynx and Bobcats, are no issue. Bunch of little Mustelids ( Martens and Fishers), count yourself very fortunate to even see one. The Black bears, grizzly bears, cougars, wolves and coyotes need to be considered.

Lots and lots of lovely flat (and level) grassy camping spots all over up the logging roads. Many are well up into the high grazing leases. My greatest fear in a tent is getting stomped on by stupid cattle in the night.

Some places, our parks in particular, have fenced camp sites that do cut the "wildlife interactions."
The whole idea of camping in the UK with nothing intending to chew on me is a delightful ambition.
 
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TLM

Native
Nov 16, 2019
1,076
427
Vantaa, Finland
A scared human can do surprising things, we do after all descend from brachiating apes. ;)

In certain parts of the country here it is not difficult to find pines where on can set up a hammock.
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,676
1,629
McBride, BC
In the UK, I'd be planning for the worst of wet, cold and windy. Can't imagine that much else is an issue.
Out of the weather with hot food, how pleasant.

Watching them, you would be convinced that bears do a cost/benefit analysis before an attack.
The only two exceptions are when you get between the sow and her cubs. You die. No discussion, day or night.
The other is to stumble upon a kill site. The prey animals will be partially covered in veg that the bear scrapes up.
You need to run at least a quarter mile.
Bears can catch galloping horses. They can cruise at 30 mph.
We get fools on mountain bikes believing that they can out-race a bear on a logging road.

Trying to find and climb any tree on a dark and cold, moonless night in October with a bear at your heels
just isn't in the cards for me. 12 ga s/s shotgun with SSG is a better deterrent. Rather not bother at all.
 

Silverclaws2

Tenderfoot
Dec 30, 2019
72
39
52
Devon
I suspect the natural fear of the dark is because our most dominant sense - sight is largely useless, forcing us to rely on senses we might in our day to day life consider secondary, when in reality, they're just as useful in the right contexts. In addition I further suspect another fear of the dark is the result of conditioning that has taught us anything dark and yes this does have some bearing on the BLM issue is something to be avoided or feared.

But how to counter the fear of the dark, do so by way of practice ; take to going out at night where there is no artificial light, to perhaps sit and let your senses explore where I got over my fear of the dark by playing a game, a game of which I in my mind tried to identify what my senses picked up; ah an owl, barn owl I think and something creeping around in the bush, not human, it's too careful where if one was to focus on something in the bush, focus your hearing on that one things and in your mind's eye picture what it's up to create story. But if you go where artificial light isn't and you don't wreck your night vision with artificial light of your own, where it can take up to twenty minutes for that night vision to fully return, you will soon discover how much light there actually is in the dark, to perhaps go out hiking in it or at least walking

Work to recognise and undo the conditioning and you may soon find the dark is in fact a welcoming place.
 

Woody girl

Full Member
Mar 31, 2018
2,825
1,924
62
Exmoor
I do like to walk at night on my own. I can happily walk about on a moonless night with just a stick and no vision at all. I know the paths very well in daylight. They are a lot more fun at night!
A full moon makes things visible and is like daylight on a clear night.
I'm not happy in town at night.. even my tiny town. I prefer the woods and fields any time... day or night!
 

Trig

Nomad
Jun 1, 2013
275
57
Scotland
Towns make me wary in the day, never mind at night.

Out camping doesnt bother me much, not usually in popular spots or near other people.
Wild animal noises can spook you, but not too bad once you learn what they are.

One thing i dont do, since i started camping, is watch horror movies. Imagination is the biggest enemy, so i try not to fuel it.Dog soldiers terrified me when i was young. :)
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,807
2,984
Mid Wales
Towns make me wary in the day, never mind at night.

Out camping doesnt bother me much, not usually in popular spots or near other people.
Wild animal noises can spook you, but not too bad once you learn what they are.

One thing i dont do, since i started camping, is watch horror movies. Imagination is the biggest enemy, so i try not to fuel it.Dog soldiers terrified me when i was young. :)
Yep, especially up in Scotland :)