Bike trailer

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slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,240
270
Devon
Does anyone use a bike trailer at all? As in a trailer pulled by a bike.

Just wondering how you get on with it? If it's empty does it drag much and require much more effor to cycle? Does it cause any steering/stabilitiy issues at all?
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,962
866
Lancashire
I used a single wheel, Bob yak style on a family cycle tour in Scotland. I needed more load capacity since our 3 year old was on my partner's bike and I only had rear pannier rack? Loaded it was a pig to balance with it. Never tried it unloaded but if expect to not to feel that bad.

Two wheeler trailers are better with carry freedom considered the best I think. Those don't affect bike balance and from experience of our son's two seat child trailer when without child, shouldn't be too bad when empty. Loaded they're the better option too.

Bear in mind they're free rolling so whilst you do get drag it's not too bad. Aerodynamics in a headwind was very noticeable with even the streamlined burly trailer we had. A flat bed cargo trailer without a load shouldn't be too much of an issue in a head wind. Loaded is always a different matter!!

What use do you have in mind for the trailer? Cargo, shopping, touring load or other?
 

srod

Forager
Feb 9, 2017
112
59
argyll
I regularly use a 2 wheeler trailer with the bike. Highly recommend for moving stuff about and saving unnecessary car trips. So versatile.

Easy to tow, don't notice it too much when up to speed, braking or cornering. Just have to be aware of it when passing narrow spaces or tight turns. Can be a bit of hassle when pushing the bike through busy places or boarding trains.
 

slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,240
270
Devon
Yes, it's for moving stuff about rather than long treks. So a couple of bags of shopping, a bag of rubbish or even chainsaw or air rifle. Not far but over poor rural roads.

I was thinking a 2 wheeler but not something overly expensive. I hadn't really thought about it but perhaps breaking if carrying a fair load would be a bit of a concern.

I notice some connect to the rear hub and some under the saddle - is any option better than the other?
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,962
866
Lancashire
Rear hub is better because the seat tube mounts can affect stability. Axle mount you can lean your bike as you pedal without leaning the trailer. It kind of isolates the bike and trailer in a way. The burly trailers have a good mount that flexes in all directions so you can even lay your bike flat on the ground without tilting the trailer at all. I think carry freedom is similar?

There's another certain type of hitch which can be retro fitted to other trailer makes which is as good. Unfortunately I can't remember what it's called. I've heard of people getting their hands on a cheap trailer, stripping it back to the bare chassis, adding that hitch and bolting a box onto it. There's trailer makes that supply the bare chassis and you can attach your own container or buy one they make.
 

srod

Forager
Feb 9, 2017
112
59
argyll
Mine attaches to the hub, via hitch that attaches to the hub axle skewer. Simple to set up and quick to hitch and unhitch. Never tried a seat post attachment, but would imagine the hub attachment is more stable. Seat post might be more maneuverable in very tight places.

I think they tend to come with 16" or 20" wheels, perhaps look for the bigger size for rougher roads.

Also I'd look for one without, or at least removable side frames. If everything is boxed, bagged or lashed securely they do nothing except get in the way and add weight.

I think you can get a good one off eBay for about £60 to £100. Mine was originally a pet trailer with the canvas compartment bit removed to make it into a flatbed.

I've covered well over 1000miles with it, all sorts of loads, camping gear, shopping, firewood, my elderly dog, children, other bikes, inflatable canoes, kitesurf gear etc etc.
 

slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,240
270
Devon
Very impressive trailer, was part of it once a ladder? I don't need to carry that much for now but it's good to know you can carry a fair bit as, one day, I could cycle long logs back. Do you get many comments from other people when cycling those loads about?

Thanks for the other replies. I'm looking at a cheapish £100 trailer to start with, then I can have a bit of a play with and changes as required. I'll look for a hub connection and see if I can get some decent sized wheels on it.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,962
866
Lancashire
One upgrade supposedly worth it is the Weber hitch. On a cycling forum I visit that's the advice I've read from experienced utility cyclists who have made/modded their own trailers.
 

warthog1981

Full Member
Jun 3, 2004
1,821
52
40
Fife
Very impressive trailer, was part of it once a ladder? I don't need to carry that much for now but it's good to know you can carry a fair bit as, one day, I could cycle long logs back. Do you get many comments from other people when cycling those loads about?

Thanks for the other replies. I'm looking at a cheapish £100 trailer to start with, then I can have a bit of a play with and changes as required. I'll look for a hub connection and see if I can get some decent sized wheels on it.

It was indeed a ladder I actually bought a triple ladder just for the purpose of cutting up to make it
:0) yeah I get a fair few looks from people when out and about with it.
Normally lots of comments from people asking where they can get one form.
I’m working on a smaller trailer which I should hopefully get done soon that I’ll stick pictures up of

Cheers Russ
 

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