woods - eating and cooking

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cranmere

Settler
Mar 7, 2014
992
1
Somerset, England
On some websites they say that birch tea is slightly toxic. No scientific reports though...
Birch leaves and bark contain small amounts of methyl salicylate, a close relative of aspirin. In moderate quantities it shouldn't cause any problems unless you're sensitive to aspirin and related chemicals - people with asthma should treat it with caution. Birch wood has only tiny traces so shouldn't be a problem.
 

Baelfore

Settler
Jan 22, 2013
556
0
Ireland
Birch leaves and bark contain small amounts of methyl salicylate, a close relative of aspirin. In moderate quantities it shouldn't cause any problems unless you're sensitive to aspirin and related chemicals - people with asthma should treat it with caution. Birch wood has only tiny traces so shouldn't be a problem.
Did not know that. supposed to be trying this next week on camp and the missus is asthmatic!

Thanks for sharing!
 

TallTom

Forager
Mar 23, 2014
185
0
Surrey
Any ideas on False acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia) (fabaceae)? Can I'd but no idea how to figure out food safety. ..cheers
 

tutorp

Member
Dec 21, 2014
12
0
Trondheim, Norway
Hi guys,

Been working on an excel sheet of this information. The first sheet is in English, the second one in Dutch (more useful to me ;) )
I really like jdlenton's suggestion, especially the information for the drills would be much appreciated but all other tips are welcome too.
Let's make this spreadsheet something every bushcrafter should print and carry (or have memorized :p).

Linky (can't attach it here :( ): http://depositfiles.com/files/vlgzlk2bt
With the excel sheet in that link gone, I've made a new one using Google Docs. I'm no expert at all, but I've used my limited knowledge and google fu to at least start off with the firewoods. This doc has another big advantage: You can all edit it. So anyone, feel free to do so; add your own knowledge and correct my mistakes.

As the legend on top states: Y is for Yes (good choice), N is for No (do not use), NR means Not Recommended (usable, but with distinct drawbacks), ? is for uncertain properties, and + and - can be used to note if a wood is better or worse than "average". Y+ means excellent choice, Y- would mean poor choice, but without large drawbacks. So, for example, oak and cherry are Y+ for firewood (long burning and pleasant aroma, respectively), larch Y- (relatively little heat), pine NR (resinous), and so on. Please use "N" only for woods that should not be used, and NR for woods that are, well, not recommended.

If someone could be so good as to go through my firewood ratings and correct any mistakes I've made, that would be really nice. Also, if you feel like adding any new columns, for any other sort of common resource/activity, feel free to do so. For uncommon resources (like resin, or tinder fungi, or whatever), use the notes/other resources column.

Link
 
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TallTom

Forager
Mar 23, 2014
185
0
Surrey
With the excel sheet in that link gone, I've made a new one using Google Docs. I'm no expert at all, but I've used my limited knowledge and google fu to at least start off with the firewoods. This doc has another big advantage: You can all edit it. So anyone, feel free to do so; add your own knowledge and correct my mistakes.

As the legend on top states: Y is for Yes (good choice), N is for No (do not use), NR means Not Recommended (usable, but with distinct drawbacks), ? is for uncertain properties, and + and - can be used to note if a wood is better or worse than "average". Y+ means excellent choice, Y- would mean poor choice, but without large drawbacks. So, for example, oak and cherry are Y+ for firewood (long burning and pleasant aroma, respectively), larch Y- (relatively little heat), pine NR (resinous), and so on. Please use "N" only for woods that should not be used, and NR for woods that are, well, not recommended.

If someone could be so good as to go through my firewood ratings and correct any mistakes I've made, that would be really nice. Also, if you feel like adding any new columns, for any other sort of common resource/activity, feel free to do so. For uncommon resources (like resin, or tinder fungi, or whatever), use the notes/other resources column.

Link
That looks like that will be a brilliant document once completed. Unfortunately I can't seem to edit it or I'd add some carving/utensil notes.
 

tutorp

Member
Dec 21, 2014
12
0
Trondheim, Norway
Odd. I've enabled editing for anyone with the link, no login required, and am able to do so myself when logged out. I've edited the above post in case there's a problem with the link; please try again. If the problem persist, you could PM me your google email, and I can add you specifically to the list of people able to edit. :)
 

Christian Chessher

New Member
Nov 16, 2018
1
1
30
hartlepool
i made an account just to say thank you for making this post.

i am an amateur trying to get into wild camping and bushcraft. i quickly learned when attempting to forage that some woods are actually toxic.

my eventual goal is to cycle from London to Edinburgh using no fixed route, essentially explore the length of the uk. i need some experience first.

also my favorite tree is birch. bark is endlessly useful, its non toxic, burns well, easy to identify, and burns well.
 
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