woodlore instructors

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skog

Forager
Aug 9, 2011
151
0
wicken
Hi all I know this may well be a bone first post but have been a long time lurker and find the broad range of subjects here both fascinating and truly enjoyable read.

Now I not sure how many others harbour secret fantasies and day dream in work about being able to do this full time or even on a part time basis. But I for one do

Was playing around on the web the other day and found myself on the woodlore website and in particular their section about tge camp assistant s and assistant intructors and it got me wondering in particular how much these guys earn?

I know its a very blunt question and in no way saying I have what it takes as I imagine the places when they do take on are pretty much dead mens boots and fiercely contested to win.

But just wondering if anyone had ball park figures

Stay safe all
 

johnboe522

Silver Trader
Feb 20, 2012
353
0
lulworth
good freelance instructors can earn up to £300 a weekend if staying overnight. If not the normal date rate in this neck of the woods in £100 a day
 

xylaria

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
good freelance instructors can earn up to £300 a weekend if staying overnight. If not the normal date rate in this neck of the woods in £100 a day
Putting it like that makes it sound like easy money. It isnt. Take a friday 6pm to sun 4 pm course. That is 46 hours. Teaching is intensively tiring, try doing it for whole weekend. I dont know how much preparing weekend bushcraft courses take, but when I do foraging the prepping takes several hours for an afternoon lesson.
 

johnboe522

Silver Trader
Feb 20, 2012
353
0
lulworth
I know it's hard work I never said it was easy!! I do it, but he just asked for a ball park figure


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skog

Forager
Aug 9, 2011
151
0
wicken
Guys thank you for the replies. As I said in my original post was mere ponderings after happening across the woodlore recruitment page. As anyone here worked for them and would like to share what life is like with them?
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,780
1,863
S. Lanarkshire
When folks just see figures they think it's easy money. For a weekend's work though it can take me the best part of a week prepping for it.

You do get into the habit of having things organised, but it needs constant upgrading, etc., and since it's using natural materials, and in our temperate climate everything decays, that needs constant collecting, gathering, being aware of when and where.

Not trying to put anyone off, just pointing out that if the figures are the only thing folks are judging on, then when divided by the actual hours of work put in, it's not anywhere near as good as it looks at first glance.

cheers,
Toddy
 

skog

Forager
Aug 9, 2011
151
0
wicken
Wayfarer thank you for the reply and agree with you 100% . Maybe if I could explain myself a little better as just reading back my original post I could phrase it a little better. I have had a keen interest in the outdoors since a young age and that followed onto joining the military and serving for 9 years. Have been out now for a couple of years and whilst greatful to have a well paying job I long to have a job where I'm back with nature. But I am in the trap where Im the only bread winner in the family due to having a new born in the house and cant afford tge money to pay for college courses to retrain and after looking on the web the woodlore system of taking assistants and giving them the opportunity to work towards an instructor grade seems the perfect way. Also im under no illusions as to how much of a long shot it would be due to who's company it is and no doubt they probably get hundreds of applications every week. But we only have one life and nothing ventured etc.
 

rik_uk3

Banned
Jun 10, 2006
13,320
20
65
south wales
£100 a day sounds a lot but how many days work per year does a typical instructor get? £300 for a weekend is still only £15,600 if you manage to work every single weekend for the year so its pretty poor money in the scheme of things, not good for a family person really :(

How many instructors do we have here who provide enough income from bushcraft teaching to live on I wonder. The OP may be better off working and going on 'meets' here and as his knowledge increases he can pass it on to other newcomers...no pay but still satisfying.
 

munkiboi182

Full Member
Jan 28, 2012
583
2
33
taverham, thorpe marriott, norfolk
This line of work is seasonal too. I worked myself into the ground through the summer but I've only had a handful of days work since. I'd recommend having a backup in place for the winter months. I got my CSCS card so I could do Labouring jobs topped up with occasional gardening work
 
Nov 29, 2004
7,808
7
Scotland
A few years back I met a chap from Newcastle who spent six or seven months a year working for a company that took English children on canoe trips down the Ardèche Gorges in France. He was a brickie and spent his winters back home working on construction sites, but his summers were spent on the water, not a bad life I thought.

It helps to have a trade to fall back on. :)
 

Oakleaf

Full Member
Jun 6, 2004
331
1
Moray
Skog

Your OP was fine and got what you meant. Dont read any posts as specifically leading to road of 'money for old rope ' etc; think its just part and parcel of the subject. Wouldn't fret about it :)

Agree with all that's been said - there are those mining a seam so to speak, but for 99.9% of professionals you get a far higher hourly rate working in Burger K or MacD's - but doubt few would trade ( or stay sane for longer than 20 mins if they did ).

Most important is a sense of humour - not least for when you try to get professional insurance and start using words like cutting, sharp, knife, AXE!!!! and to top it off ... fire. :)
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,780
1,863
S. Lanarkshire
Greenwoodworking skills that provide stuff to sell at craft shows over Christmas, etc., can really help. I know a couple of folks who do that. I know another two who make baskets through Winter and that provides a steady slow flow of cash in, especially since they will make on commission.
It takes time though to build up the reputation that brings folks to you for things like those.
I also know of people who forage for expensive restaurants, but that can be a lot of work for what I'm sure the restaurants feel is an expensive product, at less than minimum wages (occasional fungus foragers apart that is).

Lots of strings to the bow if you want to make a living out of it, I think.

cheers,
M
 

johnboe522

Silver Trader
Feb 20, 2012
353
0
lulworth
You could also try gaining some NGB quals and getting outside running activites like Climbing (SPA) or Kayaking (3* level 1 Coach) Plus a walking group leader qual. All these would stand you in good stead for work in the Summer.

Main Income is residental work as a free lance member of staff covering most of these activities. Bushcraft is great when it come a long but it does take a while to get your face out there. Being Ex forces myself mate feel free to PM me if you have any questions or need help. Do you have ELCAS still? if you do then there is a compnay in Cornwall that you can get these quals from for little or no money.
 

rg598

Native
If you are the only provider for a family, this is not a particularly good career path, not only because of the low amount of money, but also because of the risk. From all of the people trying to become such instructors, how many of them are successful? It may be worth it for a young single guy to give it a try, but in my opinion is too risky for someone supporting a family. On top of that, once you turn something into a job, it has a way of quickly becoming a lot less interesting. I have had opportunities over the years to do this for a living, but have never taken them because for me this is fun, and I don't want it to become work.
 
Feb 27, 2008
423
0
Cambridge
I have looked at becoming an instructor at Woodlore also.

From what I can tell, you need to plough £1,000's into Woodlore courses beforehand to become 'qualified' by them. Then if you are lucky, it will be seasonal work. Not guaranteeing that 'in season' you will have constant work. They state you are classed as 'self-employed' if I remember rightly. If you get that far, considering the financial and personal investment, I doubt pay will be much at all.

I think for most, to get as much as possible out of it, do it for a few seasons, get the experience then set up on your own.

I think it could be a great additional income to a main job. Or if working really hard could provide a fair income throughout the year.
 

skog

Forager
Aug 9, 2011
151
0
wicken
Guys thank you so much for all the replies. I think after mulling it over today and having a rare sensible 5 minutes then best approach would be to keep my "day" job and as i work 4 on 4 off alternating days and nights i could eventually / hopefully find somthing part time and also as suggested above attend the meets and moots here. Also i think it would be benificial as whilst on nights its the perfect time to get my head in some of the books i have on plant/tree recognition etc.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,780
1,863
S. Lanarkshire
Four days off, even with family time included in that still gives a good opportunity to get involved with your local woodland groups. Countryside ranger and Greenspace ranger, services usually have volunteer groups associated with them. Everything from badger watching/den building to hedgerow maintenance and the skills involved :)
It might not bring you in any money but it can be an excellent way of both aquiring knowledge, training, skill development, and making/networking among people who themselves are connected to myriad of potential employers.
The very best of luck with it :)

http://www.wildlifetrusts.org/volunteer
http://www.tcv.org.uk/volunteering
https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/get-involved/volunteer/ways-to-volunteer/

cheers,
M