where to get bone broth suitable for dogs?

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Turnip

Full Member
Sep 28, 2010
480
37
Radnorshire
Just a quick question whilst I try to hunt some down,

Does anyone know where I can get some bone broth from that would be suitable for a dog?
I've made it before but unfortunately the other half isn't particularly keen on me making it in the kitchen again and most I've found so far aren't suitable for dogs!

Any help is as always much appreciated!

Cheers

Turnip
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
9,468
2,212
McBride, BC
Doggie soup? I've roasted a sheet of bones nearly black (Maillard) then restarted them in cold water.
Like I was making a stock for espagnole. Froze a lot of it in washed milk cartons.
One big pot on the stove for a few hours isn't an insult to my kitchen.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,282
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
As you know, dog’s food should not be salty, and commercial ‘human food’ broths seems to be quite salty.

I make my own ( for us humans) and I make two varieties, one Dark and one Light.
The dark one I roast well in oven, start boiling on stove top, then do in oven for hours and hours, usually overnight.
The light one I roast very little together with onion and carrots then do the same as with the dark one.
Oven temp 120 C.

I think a dog would prefer a Light one?

If you make a large batch, you can use some as a base for your own ( human) food. Soups, casserole base, pasta sauce etc,

Broth freezes very well.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
36,883
2,762
S. Lanarkshire
Would your Missus object to you using a pressure cooker ?
The reason I ask is that we make oxtail soup and potted hough using pressure cookers, and basically they reduce cartilage and bone to jelly.
Under an hour and a hough is reduced to a few pieces of bone and a pot ful of nutrient rich jus.

No added salt, and not a lot of bother to make....and no burnt bone stink in the kitchen either. It's for the dog, so roasted bone flavouring isn't a necessity. Nutrition is.

Works on fish or fowl too....and it really does turn them into soup. Takes about an hour. Beef and pork, give it a couple of hours if you want the bone really well done, but the cartilage, etc., will reduce in about 40 minutes.

M
 
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Turnip

Full Member
Sep 28, 2010
480
37
Radnorshire
Would your Missus object to you using a pressure cooker ?
The reason I ask is that we make oxtail soup and potted hough using pressure cookers, and basically they reduce cartilage and bone to jelly.
Under an hour and a hough is reduced to a few pieces of bone and a pot ful of nutrient rich jus.

No added salt, and not a lot of bother to make....and no burnt bone stink in the kitchen either. It's for the dog, so roasted bone flavouring isn't a necessity. Nutrition is.

Works on fish or fowl too....and it really does turn them into soup. Takes about an hour. Beef and pork, give it a couple of hours if you want the bone really well done, but the cartilage, etc., will reduce in about 40 minutes.

M

Cheers Toddy, I don't have a pressure cooker but might see if I can borrow one! Last time it was in the slow cooker for hours (Obviously) and it stank the kitchen out for days!
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
9,468
2,212
McBride, BC
Roast the bones but don't burn them. There's a profound difference between Maillard and cremation.

I never salted doggie soup. We hunted over a pair of Chesapeake Bay Retrievers.
After a long, wet, cold, day in the field, they ate that broth treat with great gusto.
 

Gaudette

Full Member
Aug 24, 2012
872
17
Cambs
Cheers Toddy, I don't have a pressure cooker but might see if I can borrow one! Last time it was in the slow cooker for hours (Obviously) and it stank the kitchen out for days!

You can usually find them cheap in charity shops. They don’t seem to be widely used even though they are a great bit of kit


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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Paul_B

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 14, 2008
5,237
1,008
Lancashire
As you know, dog’s food should not be salty, and commercial ‘human food’ broths seems to be quite salty.

I make my own ( for us humans) and I make two varieties, one Dark and one Light.
The dark one I roast well in oven, start boiling on stove top, then do in oven for hours and hours, usually overnight.
The light one I roast very little together with onion and carrots then do the same as with the dark one.
Oven temp 120 C.

I think a dog would prefer a Light one?

If you make a large batch, you can use some as a base for your own ( human) food. Soups, casserole base, pasta sauce etc,

Broth freezes very well.
Just leave out the onions if making for a dog. Alliums are not dog safe.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 14, 2008
5,237
1,008
Lancashire
If buying a pressure cooker secondhand check it over well and ideally replace the seal before using. Heard of accidents with faulty old pressure cookers. Iirc the pressure release is one weak point, spraying out hot liquids. Could be wrong but I think pressie cookers scare people which could mean misuse and lack of care/ damage.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 14, 2008
5,237
1,008
Lancashire
Have you contacted any bulk raw food suppliers? Farm shops supply for farm dogs so could be a good source. Anywhere dealing with hunting dog owners I reckon.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
36,883
2,762
S. Lanarkshire
If buying a pressure cooker secondhand check it over well and ideally replace the seal before using. Heard of accidents with faulty old pressure cookers. Iirc the pressure release is one weak point, spraying out hot liquids. Could be wrong but I think pressie cookers scare people which could mean misuse and lack of care/ damage.

The pressure release sputters, that's normal, but it worries folks who've no experience of the pressure cooker.
If it didn't basically you'd have a bomb in your kitchen.
Leaky seals are messy, but better than the alternative.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 14, 2008
5,237
1,008
Lancashire
My worry would be catastrophic failure. This genuinely happened to a friend of my gran. She gave me my old one. After hearing about her friend's case she went out and bought me a new one and insisted on seeing me throw the old one out. She's a worrier about things like that.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
36,883
2,762
S. Lanarkshire
Sorry to hear that, but I've been using them for nearly half a century and I've never had one go 'off', and I didn't know anyone else who had either.

I think it's misunderstood. I think folks think it's hermetically sealed and it cannot be. It must not be. It vents steam as it cooks. That's normal, and since the steam is coming out of a tiny wee vent, it sputters a bit at times.
It's necessary since the heat applied at the base builds up the pressure, but trapped pressure that's increasing all the time is bad. If the pot can cool from the outside then that lowers that pressure, but if it can't cool down in balance with the heat going in, then it vents. That's its safety valve and why we can use pressure cookers at home anyway.

Only problems I ever have are with beans and the like. They're inclined to froth and it gets messy.

Keep them clean, don't mangle the safety valve, or the vent nozzle under the weights, and check the sealing ring is sound.
My old one, bought forty years ago, wore done after thirty years use. It's aluminium and the cast locking fittings had worn thin and shiny. Himself bought me a new one and the old one is only used now as a deep pot to bring kilner jars to the boil for 20 minutes with no splashy mess.

M
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,282
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Just leave out the onions if making for a dog. Alliums are not dog safe.
I would not dream of giving a such fantastic broth to a dog! (with or without an onion)

Lick my plate after I enjoyed it - yes.


I have been a dedicated pressure cooker fan all my life. I dislike the Aluminium vessels, as I once discovered heavy pitting in one I had used for a couple of years, my first one. . S/s seems to be vastly more resistant.

It is important to keep the seals clean and 'conditioned' so they last well. I use normal cooking oil.

I take apart the vent and safety vent once a year about, clean and condition.

I have the very oldfashioned type. Made in West Germany. Have been thinking of upgrading, but am a bit suspicious of the design, quality and manufacture.
I keep the old one as long as I can.
 
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