What to do with Sage

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Mar 6, 2020
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Hemel Hempstead
I got a sage plant earlier in the year and now it is huge. I have way more sage than i need for stuffing. Does anyone have any good sage ideas? If not, i will bag it up and freeze it and make stuffing for the rest of my life.
 
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Toddy

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Jan 21, 2005
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S. Lanarkshire
It's good as tea, the Chinese used to swap many times the weight of tea for sage.

It's also good stripped off the vein and then fried, and those crispy bits added as a flavour boost on foods.

If you grind it down with seasalt, it makes a really useful seasoning, and since it is a strong flavour boost it cuts the amount of salt you will use.

You can pop whole leaves into stews and soups the same way that you would do bay leaves.

I put leaves into a net bag and hang them out on the washing line to blow dry. I rub those leaves up with rosemary, thyme and parsley to make the classic British herb seasoning mix. I add lovage or savoury too if I have any, and some of the marjoram sometimes.

It's also really good cut up really fine and added to bread dough too. It's a 'winter bread' for us. Brilliant with soup. Really nice if I add chopped dried tomatoes into the bread mix too.
 

Nice65

Full Member
Apr 16, 2009
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W.Sussex
I have the same problem. Ignoring the ever pesky bindweed, that clump consists of one sage, one rosemary, and one marjoram plant I picked up at a nursery a few years ago. I’ve given up trying to find uses for it, I just cut it hard back every so often and throw it in the green bin.

It’s probably better dried than frozen, the leaves can be rubbed down into fragrant fluff for adding to food. It’s such a strong flavour I don’t really want to be finding ways to use it all the time because I’ll go off it.

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Woody girl

Full Member
Mar 31, 2018
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Exmoor
Drink sage tea in moderation. It can cause problems. I've forgotten what but I do remember this from a herbal course i did many eons ago.
I've drunk it daily for two weeks no ill effects but I stopped for a few weeks after that. Sage has medicinal uses so makes a good gargle for sore throats and also I have made a hair rinse with it .
Sometimes I will burn a leaf to get rid of bad smells ( burnt food or toilet) in the house.
Sage is one of my favourite herbs.
 

Toddy

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Jan 21, 2005
36,320
2,312
S. Lanarkshire
I have the same problem. Ignoring the ever pesky bindweed, that clump consists of one sage, one rosemary, and one marjoram plant I picked up at a nursery a few years ago. I’ve given up trying to find uses for it, I just cut it hard back every so often and throw it in the green bin.

It’s probably better dried than frozen, the leaves can be rubbed down into fragrant fluff for adding to food. It’s such a strong flavour I don’t really want to be finding ways to use it all the time because I’ll go off it.

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I find that cooking it really mellows the taste of it. Fresh, yes, you can use too much :)
 

slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,238
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Devon
You can never have too much sage. It goes well in all sorts of things such as soups and stews and is a vital ingredient in home made mixed herbs.

Sadly it doesn't seem to grow well here, plants only lasting a year or so. In a previous house it flourished and I once made sage flower wine. Sounds a bit strange and it didn't go according to plan but we ended up with a really good tasting pink fizzy wine. I'd love to make some more. (It tasted more subtle than a mouth full of sage leaves).
 

Billy-o

Native
Apr 19, 2018
1,659
732
Canada
Make a very sagey gravy or an apple sauce with lots in. Great with pork, butternut squash and greens ... really goes well with sweetness

Also, if you are slow cooking pork, make a bed of sage for it to cook into. Sage is very excellently rustic with lentils and sausages. A sweet red cabbage recipe (cabbage, onions, apples, sultanas - or dried cherries - carraway, sage, stock, sugar, vinegar, butter) slow cook for four hours

Sage lends a lot to pickled red cabbage ... good with cold collation ... cheese, pork pie etc.

Like Toddy says, sage with cheese in scones, bread etc. Or, any savoury adventure. Very good :) Sage and olives is of those noble combinations.

Also, I don't know if it actually does work, but I feel that it helps, and therefore use it for this: rub it on yourself to keep mozzies off.
 
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slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,238
270
Devon
Also, I don't know if it actually does work, but I feel that it helps, and therefore use it for this: rub it on yourself to keep mozzies off.

Does it help to also use a splash of olive oil and leave yourself on the top shelf of the fridge overnight? ;)

It's also adds flavour and goes well with courgette; we make a nice pasta source with onions, courgettes, garlic and plenty of herbs such as sage.

Whole leaves fried until crispy in a little oil are also good. Not burnt to a crisp but removed when still nice and green but crispy.
 

bobnewboy

Native
Jul 2, 2014
1,022
465
North West Somerset
Whole leaves fried until crispy in a little oil are also good. Not burnt to a crisp but removed when still nice and green but crispy.

OMG :) One of my faves! Crisped up in good olive oil, and then the whole lot stirred through hot spaghetti with a bit of butter. AKA 'spaghetti con salvia e burro'. The Italians make the best simple dinners.......slurp

Cheers, Bob

PS, I'm no foodie, just a fat bloke who likes nice food :)
 

Billy-o

Native
Apr 19, 2018
1,659
732
Canada
Had a mound of cauli and green onions and spinach about to turn. So I steamed the cauli let it cool and then made fritters with it and the spinach and onions and lots of curry pow, cayenne, cumin and turmeric. They all got scarfed by predators before they’d even cooled. So I made a second batch with the rest of the veg and a bunch of sage stirred though the batter. By this time there were sausages too! Good dinner.
 
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Toddy

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Jan 21, 2005
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If you mix cornmeal and SR flour (gluten free works :) ) sort of 1:3, I just use a heaped tablespoonful, add another spoonful of fresh yoghurt, a scant half teaspoonful of stock powder (or just whatever seasoning mix you like) four or five shredded sage leaves, a heaped tablespoonful of grated cheddar, and mix it all into a batter with some fizzy water.
Heat up a small non stick frying pan (you can add butter, or good oil, or if you like it some left over bacon fat) My cooker is electric, so about a 4 on the knob, no idea about gas, on a campfire not in the flames but to the side or well above. Pour the batter in and let it spread across the pan. It takes a good five minutes to cook enough that you can flip it over or fold it over into an omelette shape with something in the middle. Chicken, chorizo, I like shredded greens in mine, or mozzarella or chopped sundried tomatoes.

It makes a really easy, tasty kind of fritatta without eggs. It's quick and simple and adaptable, and the sage adds a a rich savoury depth to it.

It is lunchtime soon, isn't it ? :redface:
 

Toddy

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Jan 21, 2005
36,320
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S. Lanarkshire
11:45 AM at my house, Toddy. I'm off to the kitchen.

It's better for the salt/stock/seasoning, thankfully you'll have no shortage of that :)
The cornmeal gives it a crispy crust, especially if you add cheese into the batter.

Really good with a salad, but it's still good cold to pack in a pocket for a bite to eat when out.
 
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