Trip Report Part 3: Classic Backpacking 1/30/16 - 1/31/16

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Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
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S. Lanarkshire
Bet you could kick yourself now.
They're the 'Rolls Royce' of duvets :)

In use they're only supposed to last about twenty years, but if looked after they do last a long time. The lack of heavy quills means that the feathers don't get broken up the same as other feather ones.

M
 
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Rustee

Forager
Oct 9, 2014
113
0
Edge of The Wilds
I see you were caught more fortunate with the weather on your third outing and you choose to set up camp in a stretch of hardwoods with no soft woods, pine, balsam or spruce nearby. If needed could you of found a supply of dead standing hardwood to sustain a fire or did that prove a bit more difficult?

When I read through and see photos of cold weather travels, I always hope that hands and fingers don’t suffer terribly or freeze on to the camera….

I truly appreciate your attention to the details of classic backpacking/camping. Planning, preparing, then going and doing, all while working to capture just the right photo and then creating and putting up posts like this is a lot of work. Thanks for sharing your journey and adventure.

Take care and be well, Rustee

 

John Fenna

Lifetime Member & Maker
Oct 7, 2006
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I had an Eiderdown that was on my bed from my earliest remembered childhood - a darkish Paisley pattern...
One of my first "serious" sewing projects saw me dismember it for a duvet gilet - which was stolen from the back of our car in the Lake District!:(
Eiderdown is the BEST!
 

mousey

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jun 15, 2010
2,210
252
38
NE Scotland
My wife recently bought the kids new duvet, larger king sized ones as they like to wrap themselves up, or share - try getting two kids to share a single [or even a double] blanket! but still thin enough to get in the washing machine. Anyway one of the old ones was a down duvet - nothing special, 540gsm fill [If the label is reliable] probably got a high feather to down ratio [most 'down' pillows etc have something like an 80/20 ratio of feathers to proper down! - but then I suppose for a pillow/ cushion having a bit more structure may be a good thing]. Anyway I sewed some loops in the corners attached a bit of elastic cord and hey-presto an full length underquilt for my hammock. I've go a 3/4 [Higher grade, maybe 700 fill down IIRC] under-quilt but I find it's nicer to be totally enclosed underneath!

I suppose it's the same story of how big and heavy something is for it's warmth trade off. I'm beginning to like being warmer so I'm more willing to carry slightly heavier and bigger volume to stay warmer. When I was younger I didn't feel the cold so much so was happy to go light weight.

Anyway great series of reports from you rg598 I've enjoyed them immensely and I hope there are more to come!
 

rg598

Native
Thanks Rustee. You can always find wood to burn. It just requires more care in a hardwood forest. I had a small amount ready in case I needed it for any reason. If I have to get up in the middle of the night to look for firewood, I've got serious problems. :)

As far as the quilt, the one I bought said it's 550-600 fill down. It's not great, but it's okay. I don't think they used those designations back in the day, so I'm not sure how well that matches to what the average person would have used in the day. I'm sure better stuff was available, and some worse.
 

bodhran4me

Member
Jan 9, 2011
11
0
Ontario, Canada
I got this link from another forum. http://www.practicalprimitive.com/skillofthemonth/happyrock

While I can't say I have used it in a sleeping arrangement I have used hot rocks to dry out my boots with good results. You do want to be careful with your selected rocks as saturated rocks have been known to explode when heated. Even if you didn't keep your fire going all night you could keep some buried in the coals and swap them out as the night progressed. They should still be plenty warm.

I don't know if you trust your water container to do the hot water bottle thing in your sleep kit or not. Wet gear sucks. Wet down REALLY sucks.

P.S. For what it is worth I enjoy reading the trip reports. thanks for posting.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
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S. Lanarkshire
The problem with hot rocks buried beneath bedding is that the ground is damp, and if the rocks are hot enough, one can literally be 'steamed'.
Great in dry sand :) not so good in peaty forest soil :sigh:

M
 

rg598

Native
I like using a hot water bottle when I'm sleeping in my sleeping bag. When I'm using a fire however, I try not to use hot rocks or a hot water bottle because I like to stay connected to the fire for warmth. That way I can better sense when it is getting low or about to go out. With the hot rocks you can get too comfortable and let the fire go out.

Toddy's comment also makes perfect sense. I hadn't thought of it before.
 

bodhran4me

Member
Jan 9, 2011
11
0
Ontario, Canada
Toddy, I had never thought of or heard that before but it makes a certain amount of sense if you are burying the rocks. I think it would help if used inside the bag or bedroll rather than burying or am I mistaken?
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,505
1,629
S. Lanarkshire
If you have extra clothing, that you don't mind getting sooty and perhaps overheated, because hot rocks are a kind of 'how hot is your rock ?' kind of thing, then yes, inside does work.
It's something not quite comfortable though, and rocks do scale as they cool. I use a granite stone at home as a food heat retainer under serving dishes, marble too works well….not all rocks are suitable, and not all rocks start off bone dry.

Honestly, a sound drinks bottle filled with hot water is a much easier option.

M
 

John Fenna

Lifetime Member & Maker
Oct 7, 2006
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Pembrokeshire
In my youth a "Bed Brick" was as common as a rubber hotwaterbottle... a housebrick was heated in the oven then wrapped in a towel and put in the bed.
I think the towel was mainly as padding to stop you getting bruised by the brick!