Hello from a student.

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Jul 28, 2020
7
3
42
Staffordshire
Hi :)

Its great to see this forum is still active. I was a member 10+ years ago :)

I have just been accepted onto a Masters programme at the University of Cumbria, following their new Bushcraft pathway.

There are sure to be a number of areas that it would be really interesting to hear about your experiences in and views on.

Looking forwarding to learning with you all.

Paul
 
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Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,757
2,925
Mid Wales
Hi, welcome to the forum. A Masters in Bushcraft - wow, I look forward to hearing how you get on; sounds fantastic :)
 

Tengu

Full Member
Jan 10, 2006
10,991
517
47
Wiltshire
Goodness, that is different. You must let us know how the course is.

I wish I was a student still.
 

gra_farmer

Nomad
Mar 29, 2016
454
233
Kent
Welcome back Paul,

I am quite interested in the syllabus, are you able to post the course titles and any other information.

I was interested is increasing my outdoor knowledge, and went the pure science route, backed with my farming knowledge, it has helped me in every direction I have gone.

Interesting to hear your progression in the course
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
5,822
903
Bedfordshire
Hello,
A friend of mine was going to be taking that course too, but Covid19 has put pay to it for him this year I think, he would have needed to travel from outside the UK to attend. As I understand it, the course has been put together by Lisa Fenton, who is well known in bushcraft circles.

Chris
 
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uncleboob

Full Member
Dec 28, 2012
885
46
Coventry and Warwickshire
Hello,
A friend of mine was going to be taking that course too, but Covid19 has put pay to it for him this year I think, he would have needed to travel from outside the UK to attend. As I understand it, the course has been put together by Lisa Fenton, who is well known in bushcraft circles.

Chris
I was interested in the course but couldn’t figure out whether it’s campus based or a professional qual where you do occasional campus workshops?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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Jul 28, 2020
7
3
42
Staffordshire
I was interested in the course but couldn’t figure out whether it’s campus based or a professional qual where you do occasional campus workshops?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
It is a Masters either fulltime (1 year) or Part time (2 years). Each module has 5 days worth of lectures/off-off site sessions and there are then 4-5 weeks of follow up tutorials/reading/practice/paper writing, with a dissertation due also for the whole programme.
 
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Jul 28, 2020
7
3
42
Staffordshire
Hello,
A friend of mine was going to be taking that course too, but Covid19 has put pay to it for him this year I think, he would have needed to travel from outside the UK to attend. As I understand it, the course has been put together by Lisa Fenton, who is well known in bushcraft circles.

Chris
Yup, Dr Fenton is the lead on this pathway :)
 

Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,699
636
Berlin
Please inform us if they tell you how to earn money with that profession.

I am pretty good in it but always thought it would be a hobby...

(I easily could do it in German as well.)
:cool:
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
5,822
903
Bedfordshire
I can tell you something about that, Erbswurst. Lets say you are a keen outdoors type have years of experience in wild places, have practical qualifications as a mechanic, a medic, you have spent time training in the Canadian winter, traveled in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, not the tourist spots, but way off the beaten track. You are perfectly qualified to organise logistic support for groups, expeditions or just companies doing retreats. You can scout locations for film crews, those same groups/expeds and companies and work up safety and extraction plans. Then they ask what your qualifications are...they want to know that you have a degree in something. 20+ years of real experience and a bunch of courses doesn't fit into a paperwork box. No degree....and suddenly their keen interest dries up.
 

uncleboob

Full Member
Dec 28, 2012
885
46
Coventry and Warwickshire
It is a Masters either fulltime (1 year) or Part time (2 years). Each module has 5 days worth of lectures/off-off site sessions and there are then 4-5 weeks of follow up tutorials/reading/practice/paper writing, with a dissertation due also for the whole programme.
So...for each module do you attend for 5 days..then return home to complete private study and practice, then submit your assignment? Presumably there’s 1 or 2 modules per term (ft)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

gra_farmer

Nomad
Mar 29, 2016
454
233
Kent
I can tell you something about that, Erbswurst. Lets say you are a keen outdoors type have years of experience in wild places, have practical qualifications as a mechanic, a medic, you have spent time training in the Canadian winter, traveled in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, not the tourist spots, but way off the beaten track. You are perfectly qualified to organise logistic support for groups, expeditions or just companies doing retreats. You can scout locations for film crews, those same groups/expeds and companies and work up safety and extraction plans. Then they ask what your qualifications are...they want to know that you have a degree in something. 20+ years of real experience and a bunch of courses doesn't fit into a paperwork box. No degree....and suddenly their keen interest dries up.
I feel you there Chris, in my field (agriculture, botanical, pest and parasites, cartography, environmental chemistry, etc), I was not taken seriously, although I used to lecture at colleges, universities, and even written UK and European law!!!

I ended up having to do my degrees, to stay in my chosen career, only to not be kept on once I got my PhD....oh well, in industry now, so keeping your water safe and available for the next 80 years.
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
5,822
903
Bedfordshire
Erbswurst's question about how you make money from the "profession" of bushcraft got me thinking. If most people are like me, when we here of a bushcraft degree, we think about what you can do directly with the knowledge learned in that degree and how you would take that to earn money. Usually the assumption is that one would go and teach, as many do who have taken a load of bushcraft courses from the various schools.

However, with this degree, I am not sure that it isn't like any other field. Since I studied mechanical engineering and have worked in aerospace engineering, I will take that as an example.

The vast majority of what I studied, the actual subjects that made up my course, have had no direct application to the work that I did in industry. I did not use my course knowledge of calculating steam expansion in turbines, or flow around blades, or my modelling of heat transfer in Fortran to earn money. I would not expect that the half year team project in off-shore wind turbines would be all that much use in designing real wind turbines. I think that my degree gave me a bit of a frame work to hang new information from and gave a visible measure of my aptitude for absorbing and working with that type of information. It shows that I can jump through widely recognised hoops.

The connection with work is up to each individual, and the person hiring. For instance, I have worked with a number of people with physics degrees, doing everything from electronics design to reliability analysis, all in aerospace. None of those jobs are really clear options when you are choosing or completing a physics degree.

I would never have imagined that there was paying work scouting sites in the jungle for corporate retreats for executives to meditate and become centered, but that is something my friend has done, and was something where they wanted to know his qualifications.
 
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