Harvest time

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DanielCoffey

Member
Jul 5, 2015
27
0
Edinburgh, UK
I use this recipe for custard done in the microwave (800W)...

1. In a medium bowl combine 1 egg yolk, 1 heaped tablespoon cornflour and a splash of milk.

2. Add 1 tablespoon light muscovado sugar and either 1/2 tsp vanilla extract or the insides of about 1" of a vanilla pod.

3. Heat 1/2 pint full fat milk in the microwave for 2 minutes then add to the medium bowl, whisking while you pour.

4. Microwave for 1m30s then stir.

5. Microwave for 30s then stir, repeat until thickened.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
36,684
2,611
S. Lanarkshire
The vegan version goes like this….
Take 100g of ground almonds (sweet ones, not the bitter) and soak in 500ml of hot water. (you can make up to a litre if needed)
In a teacup soak at least half a dozen strands of saffron in a couple of tablespoonsful of hot water.

When both waters are cold, strain and squeeze through a bit of cotton cloth.

To the liquid add the seeds from quarter to half of a bourbon vanilla pod, four tablespoonsful of sugar (sugar is a matter of personal taste, many folks like a lot more than I do, adjust as you choose; I generally use syrup in custard) and mix two level tablespoonsful of white cornflour in a little cold water in a cup.

Bring the liquid up to near boiling and then gently stir through the cornflour water. Bring up to the boil and stir very well as it thickens. Remove from heat and put into a jug ready to pour over dumpling, pie, cake, stewed fruits, trifle …. :D
If you don't want a skin, then closely cover it the jug with cling film.
If you like your custard with a crunchy skin, then put it into a pyrex dish, top it with sugar and pop it under the grill until the sugar bubbles and turns golden.
If you don't like vanilla seeds in your custard then just use vanilla essence to taste.

Don't waste the ground almonds, they're good in cakes, biscuits, muesli, or stirred through with bournville chocolate powder :)

I know eggs are good food, I'm just really not fond.

Bird's custard powder makes life easy for most folks, and it's blooming quick at camp :)

M
 

george47

Banned
Aug 14, 2015
194
0
North Gulf of Mexico
Toddy, I must never let my wife know your recipe - she has a fetish for vegan and macrobiotic and health food kinds of things. Mung beans and sweet potato noodles. That is why I do 99% of the cooking - she is a terrible cook with bad instincts and technique. I imagine your custard is fine, but ... She is after me to make bought almond milk. or coconut milk, baked custards; but I hold off mostly.

Red, I await your video. I canned another 6 pints of blackberries tonight. I used 2 gallons - volume of berries, which comes down to 1 gallon cooked. Then removed about 75% of the seeds and pulp reducing it to 6 pints. I had added 4 cups of sugar, which helps pull the liquid out of the berries osmoticly, and keeps it in the jar better - stabler colour and such. And wile doing so realized how much time goes into this home produced stuff. I now have 13 pints, and a half pint, canned blackberries. A pint should make 2 pies with apples or whatever added, or 1 pure blackberry pie, thinish one. Or with a cheesecake bottom layer.

My freezer is almost empty - 2 gallons frozen blackberries, 1 gallon blueberries, some garden greens, 2 packs of pork, and a very few odds and ends. I think I should can the last berries but will try a pie from canned and see - they do take a lot of room making it hard to look for stuff nut are compact in a box of jars.

I cooked them with the sugar for 14 minutes, removed lots of the seeds abd pulp and waterbath canned the resulting liquid 20 minutes.
 

DanielCoffey

Member
Jul 5, 2015
27
0
Edinburgh, UK
George - if you are making large quantities of what are effectively syrups, have a look at the Mehu Liisa Fruit Steamer. It is a large stainless steel pan with a water compartment, a juice collector and a fruit holder. It has a spigot on the side for collecting the resulting juices.

It is manufactured in Finland I believe but there are importers around the world. I don't have one yet but it is on my wish list next to the All American pressure canner.
 

george47

Banned
Aug 14, 2015
194
0
North Gulf of Mexico
Daniel I would like a steam juicer very much - they were a part of the kitchen of country families here in the past - for making jellies and juice from the native grapes, muscadines and concord which are not so easily squeezed as the European kind - and berries and all else. I have a few muscadine vines planted, and a couple concords. The problem is their cost.

Last night I defrosted another couple gallons of blackberries, simmered them with 1/2 cup sugar per US pint (16 oz, a cup being 8 oz) for about 15 minutes, strained out the majority of the seeds and pulp (as they are one) but left %25 so it would still be blackberries when cooked into pies, and water-bathed 20 min.

20881060836_4c355bd1a5_c.jpg


and then this, which I am going to try, hopefully tonight, and see if I should do the same with the last couple gallons in the freezer. from the kitchen window

20881060846_4851dbbc22_c.jpg


Here is USA amazon Norpro steamer/juicer about one hundred British Pounds, $150 US. But too much for the limited use I have for one. I think the library should have this kind of thing to check out - like for 1 day only, with the ability to reserve it. http://www.amazon.com/Norpro-619-Stainless-Steamer-Juicer/dp/B002N5TQUK
 

British Red

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Dec 30, 2005
25,705
628
Mercia
Got the third batch of onions in today. The first batch were from over wintering sets. The second from Spring planted sets. This batch were raised seed this year (Ailsa Craig variety)

Ailsa Craig Onions (from seed) by British Red, on Flickr

They say you can't grow good sized onions in one year from seed.

I beg to differ

Ailsa Craig Onion by British Red, on Flickr

I am going to keep one string of each type over winter to compare keeping qualities. If, as I suspect, the seed grown last best, I will look to start saving my own seed.
 

British Red

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Dec 30, 2005
25,705
628
Mercia
Harvesting is still proceeding apace.

Loads of pumpkins for soup

Pumpkin Soup by British Red, on Flickr

Making Pectin

3) Cover in water by British Red, on Flickr

...and of course the apple rings!

Rings Ready for Drying by British Red, on Flickr

I have covered the techniques for all those on here so I won't bore by repeating them. But if you would like to see this years photos and write ups they are on our blog - welove visitors and I want to start keeping all our stuff in one place

http://www.englishcountrylife.com/english-country-life-blog.html
 
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British Red

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Dec 30, 2005
25,705
628
Mercia
Thanks Steve :)

I have every intention of still posting loads of stuff here of course, but BB set the site up and asked me to put stuff on it so....who am I to argue?

Plus if I would like to get a lot of the recipes and preserving techniques into one convenient place - Mary was nagging me to get them in a book which I may once I have collected them all up :)
 

Goatboy

Full Member
Jan 31, 2005
14,956
13
Scotland
Boy you could do a grand remake of Allo Allo with the produce in that first picture Hugh. :D
Love the smell of fresh onions and garlic when harvested. That and the treat of onion soup and roasted garlic still warm from the oven to eat with bread and cheese.
Looks a cracking harvest so far.

Sent via smoke-signal from a woodland in Scotland.
 

British Red

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Dec 30, 2005
25,705
628
Mercia
Its coming on Colin, need to get a load more Winter brassicas in and have the beans to harvest yet and a lot of beds to manure for the frosts to work. It never really ends though....which is nice!
 

george47

Banned
Aug 14, 2015
194
0
North Gulf of Mexico
Ahh we grow them to if its the same thing - we call them shallots? Plant one get about eight!

No, these are kind of like the Egyptian, or Walking onion type - with out the shallot flavor, and they flower in a big trunk where the shallot does not.

Multiplying+onions.JPG


They are mostly eaten as green onions like scallions, or the tiny bulbs cooked fresh or dried. They reproduce themselves year to year.

I grow terrible onions - so must say yours are very beautiful.
 

British Red

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Dec 30, 2005
25,705
628
Mercia
Ahhh we call them Welsh onions

Welsh Onion by British Red, on Flickr

Thanks for the compliment on the onions. We use a lot of onions, garlic etc. More than half the things I cook include them in some form, so I pretty much had to learn to grow them. Now that I have the seed growing process nailed, I'm going to start producing our own seed - fairly vital from a self reliance point of view
 

Hultafors Outdoor knife for Sale

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