Advice request for cordless tools for around the place.

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Badger74

Full Member
Jun 10, 2008
1,424
0
Ex Leeds, now Killala
Hi All,

I'm looking for advice on some cordless tools for around the place. I'm really looking for a cordless drill able to drill into the usual brick (stone if i'm lucky), concrete, wood, metal and as a screw driver when needed, but then on looking, all the marketing speak has me confused. It would be used for DIY about once a week, and not every day like a builder; budget I'd say £150. I have found this and wondered if Ryobi were any good?

Capture by chrstphrferg, on Flickr

Thanks in advance.
 

MartiniDave

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Aug 29, 2003
2,261
40
58
Cambridgeshire
Makita or De-Walt if it was my money being spent.
Screwfix have deals on both brands from time to time. For the materials you list I'd say go for the 18volt versions.

Dave
 

bopdude

Full Member
Feb 19, 2013
2,879
145
54
Stockton on Tees
The Royobi are ok but imho not as powerful as I would like, there are sites out there with all the blurb, I've owned plenty of different makes over the years but none were as good as my 18v Hitachi, Dewalt have gone down hill compared to the early models again imho

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ValeTudoGuy

Nomad
Mar 8, 2017
325
0
Preston, England
Milwaukie 18v Fuel are a cut above IMO. We could have gone with any drill on the market at work. We went with the Milwaukie's... In the region of 90 units and 3 years in we havent had a single fault and are on the original batteries.

They go through cast Iron like it's nothing and other cordless drills were really struggling with it. If you go for them just be careful how you set the Torque, at high setting they can really twist your arm up if you arent using it responsibly.

I personally own a Hitachi and it's a brilliant drill, but the batteries really leave a lot to be desired I have had a few now that just die and no longer charge. When I buy another drill it will be a Milwaukie Fuel 18v

My Grandad has numerous Makita's and they have been faultless for years... None of them have the clout of the Milwaukie though.
 
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mrcharly

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jan 25, 2011
3,246
33
North Yorkshire, UK
I have a Ryobi drill which has been used and abused. It is still going very strong and I think it is a good tool for the money. Spent about £100 on it over 10 years ago, so not a bargain basement tool. Batteries are now starting to show their age but that is really good going considering the abuse.
 

Damascus

Native
Dec 3, 2005
1,435
40
61
Norwich
I use Ryobi on a semi professional basis and they serve me well, Drill and impact driver, circular saw and multi saw, go for the 4 or 5ha batteries as the 1.5ha are gone in no time, handy as a back up though! The good thing is the batteries fit all tools, so easy to get replacements batteries or to swop about.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,205
794
63
Florida
With that big a budget I'd opt for a proper pneumatic drill instead. Unfortunately they're obviously not cordless though. I just find electric drills don't have the torque to cut though stainless efficiently.
 

ValeTudoGuy

Nomad
Mar 8, 2017
325
0
Preston, England
With that big a budget I'd opt for a proper pneumatic drill instead. Unfortunately they're obviously not cordless though. I just find electric drills don't have the torque to cut though stainless efficiently.
I would normally agree.... But the Milwaukie's put out a claimed 85nm and I believe it. My Hitachi claims upto 70nm and there is simply no way, my grandads Makita's are mostly around 45-50nm and feel similar to my Hitachi.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,251
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
I have the Ryobi system in Norway. When I leave them fully charged and unconnected, they keep the charge until I return 6 months later. '
I have the Milwaukee here. Batteries discharge fairly quickly, but the actual machines feels of a better quality than Ryiobi.

I prefer corded every time though.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,205
794
63
Florida
I would normally agree.... But the Milwaukie's put out a claimed 85nm and I believe it. My Hitachi claims upto 70nm and there is simply no way, my grandads Makita's are mostly around 45-50nm and feel similar to my Hitachi.
Thanks for the info, I'll have to check them out. Like most people, I'd also like the idea of not being tethered.
 

Hibrion

Maker
Jan 11, 2012
1,231
3
Ireland
De Walt is the only real way to go. You definitely get what you pay for when it comes to drills, like everything else I suppose. I have the 18v brushless De Walt and I can't fault it. It's probably too good for me.
 

Allans865

Full Member
Nov 17, 2016
244
32
East Kilbride
Makita or De-Walt if it was my money being spent.
Screwfix have deals on both brands from time to time. For the materials you list I'd say go for the 18volt versions.

Dave
Gotta second Dave on this

I use both of these brands at work, and they take some abuse!

They are at the upper end of the cost bracket though, but with good reason

Purchase any tools by these brands and you'll more than likely have tools for life

Thanks,
Allan


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Old Bones

Settler
Oct 14, 2009
735
59
East Anglia
I got a Makita cordless from Screwfix last year, and been very pleased with it: http://www.screwfix.com/p/makita-dhp453sfew-18v-3-0ah-li-ion-lxt-cordless-combi-drill/2290J?kpid=2290J&cm_mmc=Google-_-Product%20Listing%20Ads-_-Sales%20Tracking-_-sales%20tracking%20url&gclid=CKLRloW2mNQCFQgW0wodH-YFiQ&gclsrc=aw.ds&dclid=CLylpoW2mNQCFRUS0wodLFEM9Q - since batteries are the thing that really cost (£65?), £129 is good value (it was £149 when I bought it).

Having the second battery means a) you've always got one ready to go, and b) you can buy a 'barebones' unit a bit cheaper. I'm looking for a Makita impact driver when I can afford it, for that reason.

Screwfix also do De Walt (apparently part of the Black and Decker group) and Hitachi. When I asked in store if I should have some cash and get Hitachi rather than the Makita, she said that while the Hitachi was OK for amateur stuff, the Makita was a far better product overall. You get what you pay for, and if you look on a building site, you'll see either Makita or De Walt, so thats probably a good sign.

However, look at Aldi and Lidl if money is tight - Lidl's kit is made by a well known German company, and Aldi's are seemingly also made in Germany. I've got a circular saw from Aldi and a planer from Lidl, and they've been excellent value.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,142
1,295
McBride, BC
My next door neighbor is a Journeyman carpenter, a good one. Cord, cordless or air, everything is DeWalt. One size/shape battery fits all the cordless.
The rustic furniture shop down the street from my house is the same, all DeWalt. They even field butcher moose and deer with a DeWalt reciprocating saw.
However.
When I look into the village automotive and mechanical shops, everybody runs Makita.

Me? A mix of everything, straight economics was the only purchase factor, amateur, occasional use.
I do believe that the power tools, the saws, etc., will easily outlive me.