Young new bushcrafter!

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Niels

Full Member
Mar 28, 2011
2,582
1
23
Netherlands
Oh and while I still have wifi, could someone point me in the direction of tutorials or lessons or something similar on this forum, as someone mentioned I should read the forum for help

Thanks
From this thread, press 'home'. And in the dark blue beam you see 'articles.'

When I started out, I found videos made by ''AZ bushcraft'' and ''Naturalbushcraft'' on youtube contained good information.

There's also loads of good blogs you can get knowledge from. These are only a few examples:

http://woodtrekker.blogspot.nl/
http://paulkirtley.co.uk/
http://frontierbushcraft.com/frontier-bushcraft-blog/

Have fun!

Niels
 

Mick721

Full Member
Oct 29, 2012
748
1
Sunderland
Welcome to the forum!

Bushcraft to me is all about learning to be comfortable in natural surroundings and enjoying the outdoors. It sounds like you're doing this already. Ditch the DPM and rifle. Bushcraft isn't about the SAS/Bear Grylls style of evasion and survival.

As for kit, a Swiss Army knife, kept sharp, is a great little outdoors tool. This along with maybe a tarp, some cord, a water bottle and back pack to carry it all in will be more than enough to keep you entertained for a long time. Maybe add in a fire steel to that and you're well on your way.

Try looking at wayland's site www.ravenlore.co.uk for more ideas. His philosophy on the outdoors and kit to carry is second to none in my opinion.
 

Mesquite

Anyone for sailing?
Mar 5, 2008
23,641
803
59
~Hemel Hempstead~
Now my plan is to go to one of the bushcraft stores mesquite mentioned with my dad (as soon as i get back home) and by a knife and then go to my local woods and just explore! :)
They're both good shops. For kit etc I'd say the Bushcraftstore is the better one to go to.

One word of advice though. DON'T take your knife with you when you go exploring your local woods. Unfortunately in current society knives and youth aren't seen as a good mix, especially if you're in a public place.

Keep it for occasions where you have permission to be on a site where bushcrafting activities are taking place like a local meet.

Whereabouts in Hertfordshire are you?
 
I live in borehamwood just off the A1, but about the local meets, I'm not sure if my parents would approve of me meeting up with strange men who I met off the Internet at night in a forest (no offence) but I'm sure maybe if someone came with me it would be alright?
 
Bushcraft to me is all about learning to be comfortable in natural surroundings and enjoying the outdoors. It sounds like you're doing this already. Ditch the DPM and rifle. Bushcraft isn't about the SAS/Bear Grylls style of evasion and survival.
Yeah i think you're right, but I wasn't sure what kind of gear I would need, and I already have them so meh. But the Dpm trousers I may still use because they have plenty of pockets on them!
 

Stringmaker

Native
Sep 6, 2010
1,891
1
UK
I live in borehamwood just off the A1, but about the local meets, I'm not sure if my parents would approve of me meeting up with strange men who I met off the Internet at night in a forest (no offence) but I'm sure maybe if someone came with me it would be alright?
It's not just your parents; many wives and girlfriends feel the same way!
 

Mesquite

Anyone for sailing?
Mar 5, 2008
23,641
803
59
~Hemel Hempstead~
I live in borehamwood just off the A1, but about the local meets, I'm not sure if my parents would approve of me meeting up with strange men who I met off the Internet at night in a forest (no offence) but I'm sure maybe if someone came with me it would be alright?
:rofl: I understand exactly what you mean... and it's not just you and your age. I and quite a few other guys have their partners questioning them as to why they want to meet men from the internet in the woods. Just look at my tag line :rolleyes:

Thing to remember though is until you're 18 someone has to act responsible adult with regards your care and just about all the meets have that as a hard rule.

Best bet if you want to go to a meet is do one of two things. Meet up with local bushcrafters that your parents get to know over time or persuade your dad to go with you to the meet and stay over as well.
You never know he might end up enjoying it as well :)
 

rg598

Native
Yeah i think you're right, but I wasn't sure what kind of gear I would need, and I already have them so meh. But the Dpm trousers I may still use because they have plenty of pockets on them!
I don't think you should give up on hunting, fishing, tracking, etc. I think they are all integral parts of being a good woodsman. Just because regulations may not allow you to hunt year round, does not mean it is not a valuable skill to possess. I think it is a very important part of buschraft. They were important skills to our ancestors, and they should be important to us.

Like I said before, don't fall into the trap of doing what other people define as "bushcraft". Be critical of everything you read and see. There is a misconception on the part of people who are just starting out that there is some great body of knowledge called "bushcraft" that somehow transcends all other outdoor activities. It simply isn't the case. You will waste many years dressing like a 19th century mountainman before it hits you. Take 10 people who have been doing bushcraft for 10 years, and you will get 10 different answers on what you should wear, what gear you should have and what skills you should practice. Start out with the basics. Learn how to travel and camp in the woods (backpacking). Once you have done that, you will develop your own style and decide what is important to you.
 

copper_head

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Feb 22, 2006
4,261
1
Hull
Welcome to the forum, I did the Woodlore Junior Fundamental Bushcraft course when I was about your age (Have a look at raymears.com). Its well worth it but your going to have to do a lot of sweet talking your folks :D

Failing that, enjoy the forum a whole world of information to be learnt.
 
Hello everyone! I'm back in Saigon after staying with a family on an island on the Mekong delta! And I have some more questions... How often do these meet-ups occur? Because if they aren't too often then I won't get to practise :( and I just want to say again, thanks for all the help and warm welcome, it really helps :)

Thanks
 
Mar 5, 2013
2
0
oxford
I would agree with the person who said , not to get too obsessed with the mystisism of bushcraft, we can't all light fires by clicking our fingers and most of us will never need to, build up to things like that once you are comfortable in the outdoors as a bit of fun.
Bushcraft is as much about anticipation and being prepared, going out into the countryside with the right equipment for our planned activities, whether that be a wilderness camp where you have to carry everything in or a couple of weeks on an organised campsite, for either some degree of adaptability will be your biggest asset
 

Niels

Full Member
Mar 28, 2011
2,582
1
23
Netherlands
Hello everyone! I'm back in Saigon after staying with a family on an island on the Mekong delta! And I have some more questions... How often do these meet-ups occur? Because if they aren't too often then I won't get to practise :( and I just want to say again, thanks for all the help and warm welcome, it really helps :)

Thanks
There's a sub forum about meet ups. So I think your best bet is to look out for a meet with people that are from your area:)
 

Mesquite

Anyone for sailing?
Mar 5, 2008
23,641
803
59
~Hemel Hempstead~
As Niels said, meets happen regularly throughout the country so keep a look in the various sub forums for ones you might like to go to.

As for practicing... you can practice all sorts of skills just in your back garden. Firelighting, knots, carving etc, Get yourself a couple ident books and try to learn different trees and plants when you go for walks.

All those things will keep you busy for sure :)
 

ForgeCorvus

Nomad
Oct 27, 2007
425
1
48
norfolk
Looks like theres a couple of young bushcrafters just started posting

http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=105993


Books are great but nothing makes the information stick like real world use, you got a garden at home? Your parents mind if you practice firelighting, woodcarving or tarp-pitching somewhere ?

For the moment stick with the SAK, I'm assuming the blade(s) are all under three inches long. This means a person doesn't need "Good Reason" to have it on them it, any locking knife or fixed blade requires a provable need ("Good Reason") in order to carry it ("Because I want to" is not Good Reason)..... I'm not sure how this law applies to under 18's, check with your scoutmaster

Be careful how and when you use it (in fact, much as it pains me to say this, leave it at home unless you are going camping or WHY), I'm not saying you are going to do something stupid with your tools but our friends with the blue flashing lights have to base their actions on experience and statistics..... And most teenagers that do carry knives seem to be doing it for the wrong reasons.

I recommend that you wear clothes that you find comfortable and are reasonably tough, weather thats gore-tex or tweed is part of the journey (Some will say one thing and others something else, you choose as you're the one who has to live with the choice)..... I'd avoid wearing all cammo though, sends out the wrong message. I will admit that I did have an 'out of work mercenary' look going at one point, but that was pre-Hungerford and I just looked like a weirdo rather then a nut-job

I'll have a poke about for some good book titles
 
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Hi and welcome, Ray Mears is a hereo of mine even though I am only 51 years young, check out his stuff and you will pick up loads, nothing like going out there and doing a bit of what you have seen and heared. This is the forum for learning and there are a lot of very good Bushcrafters that would only be too willing to answer your questions.
Follow my link for a plethora of stuff from Ray.
http://www.youtube.com/results?sear....0.168.1003.3j6.9.0...0.0...1ac.1.qDCbQIVp2LY
 

shortymcsteve

Forager
Jan 8, 2011
152
0
Hamilton, Scotland
Hey Aquabilly, i myself am a former Scout and the one thing i regret is not asking out leader to have us more involved in learning outdoor skills and good camp skills. I suggest you have a chat with your scout leader and ask if there is any courses that are coming up with another troop that you could be sent to or ask if they could practice bushcraft related skills more often within your own troop. Let them know your are serious and explain how it will benefit the whole troop.

Don't worry about learning everything at once & having a lot of equipment! You don't have to stay overnight to enjoy the woods, but if you do all you need is some good boots, warm clothing & shelter + sleeping bag. I imagine most of the equipment you have for scouting will be of use already.
I suggest you take a few trips out into the woods and observe everything around you, scout out the area so you know it well and learn the wildlife.
From there on i suggest you learn how to start and maintain a fire correct, that is a key skill.

As for kit, it's all really just a luxury. Something to cook/boil water in is useful however you can just bring dry food with you for starters along with plastic bottles for containing water (they cost almost nothing). Your Swiss army knife will serve you well for now but i don't think you will really need a knife right away.
A first aid kit is handy, i highly suggest one if you happen to bring a knife with you. Doing a first aid badge at scouts would be a good idea.

Go on youtube and search for Ray Mears videos, maybe type in 'ray mears how to' and some good instructional videos will show up. There is also a lot of young bushcrafters on youtube which i suggest you check out for ideas and inspiration. (Check out http://youtube.com/user/TheRedHawk123)

Good luck!
 
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rg598

Native
Oh, I forgot, a while back I did some posts on getting started with bushcraft and camping that might be of some use. It is from a US perspective but some may apply:

Part 1: Introduction: http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2011/11/beginners-guide-to-bushcraft-and.html
Part 2: The Day Hike-General Considerations: http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2011/11/day-hike-general-considerations-easiest.html
Part 3: The Day Hike-Clothing: http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2011/11/day-hike-clothing-now-that-we-have.html
Part 4: The Day Hike-Gear: http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2011/11/day-hike-gear-now-that-we-have-clothing.html
Part 5: Overnight Camping-General Considerations: http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2011/11/overnight-camping-general.html
Part 6: Overnight Camping-Gear: http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2011/11/beginners-guide-to-bushcraft-and_23.html
Part 7: Bringing it All Together: http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2011/11/beginners-guide-to-bushcraft-and_4781.html

The only change I would make in terms of my recommendations is to use a Sawyer Squeeze filter rather than the MSR Miniworks. It is cheaper and lighter. Hope this helps.