Web-Tex Hydration Pack? Newbie to hydration packs question

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Silverclaws2

Forager
Dec 30, 2019
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103
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Devon
Following my first hike of the year yesterday out on the green desert that is Dartmoor to tramp some ten miles on what was a surprisingly fine day I discovered I didn't do very well in the hydration department as in I didn't take enough water to consider at least doubling the quantity taken next time.

To that evening whilst back at home think e're I've got a hydration bladder type thingy around here somewhere that I have never used, maybe I should give that a try. To have found it this evening to consider it's clearly never been used so could be ideal or at least inform me of what I have been missing out on or not.

To not knowing anything about these things find it's a small backpack affair made by Web-Tex, where the only other potentially identifying information I can find on the back states ; '' AQUA TEX I.R.R DPM ATX WEB-TEX '', In fact this thing,

To ask of any that know these products, can the bladder and hose assembly be removed from the ' backpack' so as to use the assembly in a 'Hydration ready' day sack?

And if so how do I do it as I can't seem to find any user instructions for the thing.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
2,635
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Berlin
Isn't it expensive to clean them?

To be honest, I would search my attic and sheds for 10 such and similar things, sell them and buy from the money custom made boots.

Into my steel bottles I put boiling water from time to time to disinfect them.
I think I am too poor for water bladders.
 

Oliver G

Full Member
Sep 15, 2012
283
180
Melbourne, Derbyshire
It looks like a copy of the old desert issue one, if so you can remove the bladder by working the handle and opening into the bag then pulling it out through the zippered opening. Once out you can shove it in another daysack.

The issue pack had a notch surrounding the filling port which allows you to get the hook at the top of the port under the material, from the pictures it looks as if the webtex one may not, you might find it easier to lift the material over the filling port using a teaspoon, much like removing a tyre from a bike wheel.

In terms of cleaning I've found half a milton tablet (available in the baby aisle) will work well, just make sure you only put clean water in the bladder any you won't have any problems
 
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Silverclaws2

Forager
Dec 30, 2019
206
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Devon
It looks like a copy of the old desert issue one, if so you can remove the bladder by working the handle and opening into the bag then pulling it out through the zippered opening. Once out you can shove it in another daysack.

The issue pack had a notch surrounding the filling port which allows you to get the hook at the top of the port under the material, from the pictures it looks as if the webtex one may not, you might find it easier to lift the material over the filling port using a teaspoon, much like removing a tyre from a bike wheel.

In terms of cleaning I've found half a milton tablet (available in the baby aisle) will work well, just make sure you only put clean water in the bladder any you won't have any problems
Okay I have got the thing out, with lid removed flexing the inner lip did it, to suppose it is designed to be removed, to find it's either unused or it is very well cleaned, to be pleased 'it holds water ' without leaking, two litres of water, to later this day be getting stuff to sterilise it.

And yes only water to put in it, as it is when I hike I only drink water. Electrolyte replacement ? I have always carried and used electrolyte tablets of which I have found have a distinct benefit when one is aware one is flagging a bit.

But bladders, like I said I have not tried them before, to find given this one cost me nothing I would be a fool to not give it a go and my day sack does have a facility to carry one, so nothing ventured nothing gained.

If it doesn't work out, then back into it's backpack it goes to find it's way to fleabay

Thanks for the help folks.
 
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Wildgoose

Full Member
May 15, 2012
459
152
Middlesex
To keep it clean try to empty and clean it as soon as possible after use (even if it’s the last thing you feel like doing)

you can buy a cleaning kit which contains a bottle brush, pull through type device (for the hose) and a drying rack, I made do with garden wire and J cloth and it worked for me.
Don’t forget to strip and soak the mouthpiece in Milton too.
 
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Silverclaws2

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Dec 30, 2019
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Devon
would you mind to keep us posted if you find that when you had water in it for several hours, you find that it has a plasticy taste to it or not?
I would appriciate it to know.
thanks.
Will do, but to say, what water I take when I hike is filtered water as I have noticed with unfiltered water the chemicals in it can be off putting, and yeah I know if I sterilise water it can taste that way but at least in that situation I know I have sterilised the water for a reason, whereas what comes out the taps is chemically treated because of whats in the pipes.
 

Oliver G

Full Member
Sep 15, 2012
283
180
Melbourne, Derbyshire
Glad you managed to get it out. With the electrolytes, it's handy to keep a small plastic bottle that you can prepare the drink in, if memory serves the evian bottles are designed to crumble down. One thing to be cautious of is just downing the bladder in a short amount of time, I've certainly been guilty of finishing it off too quickly and then not having anything left for the rest of the day, when you stop for breaks just check how much you have left.
 

Silverclaws2

Forager
Dec 30, 2019
206
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Devon
Glad you managed to get it out. With the electrolytes, it's handy to keep a small plastic bottle that you can prepare the drink in, if memory serves the evian bottles are designed to crumble down. One thing to be cautious of is just downing the bladder in a short amount of time, I've certainly been guilty of finishing it off too quickly and then not having anything left for the rest of the day, when you stop for breaks just check how much you have left.
I will be very surprised if I down two litres in a short amount of time as I am one that doesn't dehydrate easily, to not perspire much with exertion, to suspect given I will be carrying a maximum of two litres of water I could become the group dromedary, but yeah given this thing will be hidden away I will have to keep an eyeball on supplies. And electrolytes I use daily anyway for nervous system dysfunction to be well versed in their use and efficacy wherein because I use them daily I take them in tablet form, to also know how they can act as a pick me up when one is flagging and not just from physical exertion, for at least in my case.

But I gave the thing a thorough clean last night, to have worked out an acceptable system of cleaning it and more importantly, drying it. scrunched up paper kitchen towel in the badder after the obvious drops have been removed and a cotton shoe lace down the drinking tube to soak up the moisture the centrifuge didn't get. All fittings removed for individual attention to be confident this thing is now as clean as I am going to get it.

But finishing supplies too quickly, isn't there a case for carrying a water filter?
 

Wildgoose

Full Member
May 15, 2012
459
152
Middlesex
I guess it depends on where you are walking, how far from nearest water source etc.
I second Oliver’s point though, the water being available immediately does mean I get through it a lot faster than in bottles. I’m lazy so the act of digging out a bottle is enough to ration my supply.
I carry 2ltrs in a bladder and have a few puritabs in case I need more, that said I’m seldom far from civilisation so haven’t needed them yet
 
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Silverclaws2

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Dec 30, 2019
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I second Oliver’s point though, the water being available immediately does mean I get through it a lot faster than in bottles.

Good point as I would suppose immediately available water in fact forms a part of the grazing form of nutrition, to know to need to watch for that, but I wonder will constant grazing cause less need to stop for rests?
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
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I think that if we drink every few minutes a bit, in the long run it disables us to deal with thirst.
I taught in the scouts to drink like a camel at the graveyard tap and to deal with the in Germany usual 3/4 litre field flask.

Of course there are limits to that strategy.
If I need 4 litres in southern French summer conditions I simply need them.
I also there use bottles, but could imagine that a water bladder rucksack could be nice to have there.

But I mainly think these water bladders are produced for soldiers who should better hold a gun than a field flask in some situations. As I don't carry a gun I tend to find it useless.

But to be honest I didn't try it out.
Things that I don't need I don't buy to try them out and concentrate instead of it my bit money in the few things I really need and buy here the best I can afford.
 
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Silverclaws2

Forager
Dec 30, 2019
206
103
53
Devon
I think that if we drink every few minutes a bit, in the long run it disables us to deal with thirst.
I taught in the scouts to drink like a camel at the graveyard tap and to deal with the in Germany usual 3/4 litre field flask.

Of course there are limits to that strategy.
If I need 4 litres in southern French summer conditions I simply need them.
I also there use bottles, but could imagine that a water bladder rucksack could be nice to have there.

But I mainly think these water bladders are produced for soldiers who should better hold a gun than a field flask in some situations. As I don't carry a gun I tend to find it useless.

But to be honest I didn't try it out.
Things that I don't need I don't buy to try them out and concentrate instead of it my bit money in the few things I really need and buy here the best I can afford.
And if it was I hadn't got hold of one of these things for free, I wouldn't have bought one, as to consider for how long they have been in use I have not felt compelled to buy one through being comfortable with water bottles, but seeing as I do have one I have not yet tried, well this a learning exercise, a chance to learn new things.

And the history of these things seems to indicate they were first developed for the civilian market before the military and not for the first time cottoned on to what the civvies were doing to develop their own, for their own purposes, where I think what spurred the civilian design was the sport of long distance cycling where one might agree keeping both hands on the controls of a bicycle is of paramount importance, to also note they seem popular with those that use kayaks.

Where as I have taken to using hiking poles to combine hiking with Nordic walking I am of the mind to think I might find some benefit in using a hydration bladder, to be inclined to give it a good go.

As to face it, it's cost me nothing.
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
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Of course if it's already there, one can try it.
Why not?
My main point is the price of water purification tabs. That puts me off.

Although I used water bladders in the canoe and camps without getting problems I simply find them not hygienic. And I have to tell you that I have no fear to drink a bit water from any lake I swim in.
 
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nigelp

Full Member
I only use water in my hydration bladder and only use Milton fluid 3/4 times a year. I clean it a few times a week in hot water with a little washing up liquid, rinse and open it out with an old pop bottle to dry/air the inside and take apart the mouth valve, wash and dry/air it.
I’ve only had them go mouldy if I’ve used anything other than water inside.
Massive advantage of a bladder is ease to carry and drink 2/3 litres which is drink in very warm or hot weather.
If I need to refill it when out in wild country I use a water filter. Puritabs (unless chlorine dioxide) will not kill Cryptosporidium which is the main water ingested nasty you’ll get on a grazed upland area like Dartmoor.
 

cipherdias

Full Member
Jan 1, 2014
458
195
Wales
I use electrolyte in my hydration bladders as I prefer the taste over just plain water. I am religious about rinsing it out throughly and then drying it properly before putting it away and have never had problems with mould in the tube or bladder itself


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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