Unusual request

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camperman

Member
Mar 14, 2015
10
5
sidcup
Hi everyone, I've been a member here for quite while but not really contributed.
I hope you won't mind me asking for some ideas. An old friend of my wife's had a pretty bad stroke recently and has ended up in a nursing home for the elderly dementia types. He's 59 and seems fully aware to us but has real problems talking/communicating. He hates the food they're offering and we can only get to see him once a week. And apart from giving him pot noodles (he can use a kettle but nothing else), can anyone recommend any good meals that just need boiling water added.
Thanks in advance.
 

Tengu

Full Member
Jan 10, 2006
10,948
498
47
Wiltshire
Couscous. one of those things I like, but oddly, never eats much.

But I think the first question we should ask is, `what is wrong with the food he is offered?`
 

camperman

Member
Mar 14, 2015
10
5
sidcup
Thanks Tengu, couscous is a great idea if he had other things to add to it.
We are not family so have no influence over what food they offer him. He's only been there 12 days but has found the food unpleasant, to the extent that he hasn't really been eating. I think it's probably geared to the other residents. Comotose over 80 year old. I was wondering about hiking/climbing food. Stuff in pouches that just need boiling water. Bit of a shot in the dark really. He seem quite keen on the idea of pot noodles, but I'm pretty sure that will wear off quite quickly.
 

oldtimer

Full Member
My suggestion: Couscous portions in pour and store bags with dried food additives such as sausage. This is what I take on trips.

My wife's suggestion: Google dried food for camping. E.g. Discount-supplements.co.uk 10 dried meals for £33 wide range available. Whole range of foods including treats.

Guess who gets to order the provisions when we travel together!
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,760
1,849
S. Lanarkshire
One of my sons only had access to a kettle to make anything at work. He quite liked the potato versions of pot noodles...and they were gluten free which was a bonus for him too.
Knorr do some, as do Yeoman, but I'm pretty sure I picked up Morrison's own brand ones for him back then too.

I know that latterly they came with multiple versions, from onion, to cheese to bacon.

Son2 said they were tasty, but hot, and needed to be made and left to cool down a bit before he could eat them.

M
 

Tengu

Full Member
Jan 10, 2006
10,948
498
47
Wiltshire
I dont know his full circumstance but I get the impression he has independence issues.

Plus he is probably exasperated at his state and unhappy at being in with people whose needs may be very different from his.

What are the staff doing about his disinterest in the food?
 
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Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,603
2,754
Mid Wales
Just an idea but maybe a wide selection of condiments and/or spice (pickles, tomato sauce, chilly sauce, etc... what Mason called the 'food repair kit') may make the food he is being given edible.
 
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Woody girl

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 31, 2018
2,789
1,883
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Exmoor
Nutrition is very important when recovering from this sort of thing.
I would try to encourage him to eat the food provided and then make sure he has lots of tasty treats that he can have in his room.
Ovaltine horlicks hot chocolate cuppa soups fresh fruit peanuts shelled brazils etc chocolate biscuits. Ribena is good hot or cold and provides lots of vitamins. You can get a winter spice version which is lovely hot.
I expect a lot of the food is made to be spoon fed to the elderly patients so I can see it may not be to his liking at all.
Also the savory complan convalescent food is quite good in providing full nutrition. I often use them in the winter to boost my food intake as I often don't want to spend hours preparing food in a cold kitchen just for myself.
He needs things that he realy likes. Smuggle in a small chicken or beef pie that can be precooked and easily eaten cold or maybe sausage rolls. Salad pots that cost about a pound and served with some tuna salad or pre sliced cheese.
I realise these won't last long without a fridge but good for a nutritious feast on visiting day.
Can he make sandwiches? Perhaps some realy nice granery or multigrain sliced brown bread a tub of margarine and some honey marmite or peanut butter or even jam if that is what he likes. Sliced cheese and pickle would be my choice. A jar of olives pickled onions or gherkins perhaps? Mayonnaise?
I think a food rescue kit as Brock suggests could be a good idea too.
Hope you can find what he might fancy and help keep him interested in food and eating properly for his own health.
I hope he recovers well. He's lucky to have such concerned and caring friends. Good luck !
 
oats: either with a bit of butter/oil and salt or sweet with sugar/honey , milk podwer, dried fruit, nuts etc.

instant mashed potatoes (add milk to make more tasty)

I wouldn't want to live long-term on those type of food unless you have enough fresh fruit and vegies, though...
if your friend can use a microwave or toaster he would have more options, too
 

tiger stacker

Native
Dec 30, 2009
1,178
40
Glasgow
Mug shots, naked noodles, kabuto noodles/rice all ideal for short term use. A Boveril jar can be nice alternative too, mashed potato can be used with a bag of grated cheese for a simple scran.
 
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camperman

Member
Mar 14, 2015
10
5
sidcup
Thanks for all the great advice.
It's given me plenty of food for thought (groan).
I understand that the food he's being offered is probably healthy in terms of nutrition, but if he can't eat it it's not doing much good. We've been trying to impress on him how important it is for him to eat it, but we would like to provide him with some alternatives for occasional treats/snacks. Unfortunately he doesn't have access to a microwave. We are hoping this is only a temporary arraignment and that he'll be getting a two bedroom flat (he'll need 24 hour care). He's on a waiting list, but no one knows how long it'll take. Thanks once again.
 

Duggie Bravo

Nomad
Jul 27, 2013
422
74
Dewsbury
Mug shots, tinned meat, mattesons smoked sausage. I use these for work all the time. I have a microwave cup, with a clip on lid, to keep the heat in and make sure the mug shot does it’s job.

As for the kettle, you will be surprised what you can cook in it, as you can heat tins, but you need to hold the auto off button down.
I have heated tins of stewing steak and then made instant mash.
Add gravy granular to the mash to give it some flavour.
Corned Beef and instant mash.
He will need salt and pepper or some other spice to take away the blandness, that may work on the provided food too.

One tip for instant mash, make it dryer than recommend, so there is still some powder in the mix, before you add anything else from a tin to it. The extra moisture will take it to the proper consistency or if made as per instructions take it to the runny side.

Also look at things like Complan, or high quality protein meal replacement shakes from someone like The Protein Works. Not the same as eating but ensures you get the nutrition into him, they can be mixed with water so not as thick, but still have some flavour to them.



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Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,536
635
Lancashire
Do you know anyone with a dehydrator? Food that he likes cooked then dried and stored in suitable plastic bags (sorry, plastic I know but there's nothing else I know that will work). Just add hot water, leave (preferably in an insulated pouch) to cook, dish out and serve.

I know that's more work for you but the very fact you're looking for a solution suggests to me that's not going to be an issue. Good on you for caring like this. I hope you find a workable solution for your friend.

I hope he gets better. To give you hope I'll tell you about a rather vigorous, loud mouthed work colleague I have. He had a bad stroke resulting in paralysis on one side and communication issues. He spent his time post stroke trying to move his disabled side. 6 months later he was back at work, on light work production duties getting a day's count out in the morning then going home. That was completely against doctor's expectations. One difficult customer indeed, stubborn as hell!
 
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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,605
581
Berlin
Personnally I am usually to lasy to cook.

Don't forget that there are a lot of delicate solutions you just can eat cold.
 

Woody girl

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 31, 2018
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Exmoor
I don't know a man who doesn't enjoy a good pork pie. A pack of four usualy lasts a couple of days out of the fridge if not in a hot room. Have you thought of a minni beer fridge for his room? Might be able to get a preloved one cheaply. Then his ability to keep salads milk and other stuff fresh might be improved.
 

Duggie Bravo

Nomad
Jul 27, 2013
422
74
Dewsbury
I don't know a man who doesn't enjoy a good pork pie. A pack of four usualy lasts a couple of days out of the fridge if not in a hot room. Have you thought of a minni beer fridge for his room? Might be able to get a preloved one cheaply. Then his ability to keep salads milk and other stuff fresh might be improved.
Bit of thread drift here....
We do a periodic Pork Pie challenge where we blind taste local pies and shop bought. The ones bought in packs of 4 never score highly and in most cases don’t even get swallowed



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