The man who has lived as a hermit for 40 years

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Tony

White bear (Admin)
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Apr 16, 2003
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www.bushcraftuk.com
Some people would love this opportunity, not sure it would be as easy to set up these days but this guy managed it...


For almost 40 years Ken Smith has shunned conventional life and lived without electricity or running water in a hand-made log cabin on the banks of a remote loch in the Scottish Highlands.
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
5,605
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Mid Wales
Yeh, I read that as well; I think I'll try and watch the programme tonight. No, I think it would be close to impossible to do what he has done now unless you owned the land (and the fishing rights) where you built your cabin.

How does he have a pension if he hasn't worked since he was in his 20's? or have I miss-read it?

I get the impression he has been lucky not to need support until now though; from now on it's going to be more and more difficult I'm afraid.
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,357
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Berlin
No, Broch, you should go to your shepherd's hut and try that the next 40 years yourself. With daily reports here of course.

;)
 
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Kadushu

Full Member
Jul 29, 2014
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Kent
Anyone else remember that guy in Argentina who lived as a hermit? Quite an incredible fella in a very beautiful landscape.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 14, 2008
5,277
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Cumbria
I thought it was a sad story too.

Missed the last few minutes, what happened? If someone can pm me to let me know and prevent spoiling it for anyone who plans to watch it later. Appreciate it as something came up so I had to leave the room for the last few minutes.
 
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Robson Valley

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Nov 24, 2014
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McBride, BC
Novelty always makes a slow news day. I hope he got grandfathered in somehow so he never has to move.

Since 92% of BC is Crown/public land, you can camp here anywhere you like. The one rule is that you have to move on after 14 days.

There are several people in this district living quite successfully off grid now for decades, even in quite snug log cabins. Then one time, Government came along and tried to boost these few people out of the forest. The valley community collectively rose up and suggested that style of government was not needed here. The gov people thought the better of that and have never come back.
 
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Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
5,605
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Mid Wales
Well, he has successfully done what a lot of people would fail to do (despite what they think). However, it should be compulsory viewing for anyone planning to 'live off the land'.

On the one hand, I can connect with his love of the land and understand why he feels he cannot leave; yet on the other hand I mourn the things he has not experienced.
 

FerlasDave

Full Member
Jun 18, 2008
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Off the beaten track
Well, he has successfully done what a lot of people would fail to do (despite what they think). However, it should be compulsory viewing for anyone planning to 'live off the land'.

On the one hand, I can connect with his love of the land and understand why he feels he cannot leave; yet on the other hand I mourn the things he has not experienced.

I’m curious as to how his “permission” came about. I wonder if the land owner found him there and just accepted he was no bother or he sought permission before hand. I’m sure things were probably different back in the 70s.

I know what you mean though, I can’t imagine how he felt when he found out about his parents. I wonder if he blamed his wandering for the fact that he missed out on events and so felt if he grounded himself he wouldn’t have to worry about that again. Hmm.
 
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Paul_B

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 14, 2008
5,277
1,026
Cumbria
Living life on your own terms isn't sad but the prospect of not ending it on your terms is sad. The sad part of this story for me was the inevitable decline and how that looked like it was going to lead to others making the big decision for you.

I kept missing bits from his emergency call out I saw the recovery bit where he was tested by going fishing with two people watching him to see if he could live on his own. How the gp or doctor was asking him questions about what if scenarios. It's obvious he wanted the guy to realise his life wasn't great for his age and health. Like the medical professional wanted him to decide that so they wouldn't have to. The big decision to go onto civilisation for the care others think you need but the state doesn't give.

No, the end looked like it was heading for a sad end. That's why I thought it was sad. It made me think of diminishing facilities, choices and options you often get at the end of your days. If that's not sad I don't know what is.
 

Madriverrob

Native
Feb 4, 2008
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Whitby , North Yorkshire
Living life on your own terms isn't sad but the prospect of not ending it on your terms is sad. The sad part of this story for me was the inevitable decline and how that looked like it was going to lead to others making the big decision for you.

I kept missing bits from his emergency call out I saw the recovery bit where he was tested by going fishing with two people watching him to see if he could live on his own. How the gp or doctor was asking him questions about what if scenarios. It's obvious he wanted the guy to realise his life wasn't great for his age and health. Like the medical professional wanted him to decide that so they wouldn't have to. The big decision to go onto civilisation for the care others think you need but the state doesn't give.

No, the end looked like it was heading for a sad end. That's why I thought it was sad. It made me think of diminishing facilities, choices and options you often get at the end of your days. If that's not sad I don't know what is.
I work as a Social Worker in Elderly care ( mostly but not exclusively) and come across people like this more often that you think ( living simply and frugally in a rural area although not in total isolation) and the loss of independence really is sad to see . For me its about recognising people's lived experiences and encouraging positive risk taking but ultimately the pressure from services is to have someone in a "safe " place and avoidance of "risk".

Try telling an octogenarian farmer that he is no longer safe to live on the farm where he was born and has worked all his life ........
 

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