The load out- a guide and example (pic heavy)

  • Hey Guest, We've had to cancel our 2020 Summer BushMoot PLEASE LOOK HERE for more information.

treefrog

Full Member
Aug 4, 2008
638
27
South Yorkshire
As has been said the chopping board is a cracking idea! Nice post!
Morrisons had a set of '4 coloured coded preparation mats' for blue for fish, red for raw meat, yellow for cooked meat and green for veg, for the princely sum of £1.99, (I think they've gone up to £2.50 though) for use as lightweight chopping mats.
 
S

sccadmin

Guest
Thought I'd post my example as well :)

Bergen - Karrimor Sabre 60 - 100:



I choose this bergen for a couple of reasons, 1 it has the adjustable back which I liked the thought of 2, it actually has quite a range in size from 60 way up to 130 + with side pouches etc. It is really comfy to use. I forgot to get a picture before I put it away, hence the perfect image! I do like the back system, it did live up to the hype!

Kit:



Starting top left and moving left to right

Black compression sac - Snugpac Softie Autumn - 1400g
Blue pouch - Wash kit (see below for detail) - 220g
Black pouch - Possibles kit (see below for detail) - 500g
Nato canteen, standard and crusader mug (full) - 1650g
Orange bag - Thermarest Lite 3 Short - 525g
Knife & sheath - Mora with custom Sheath - 180g
Blue towel - Lifeventure - 230g
Plastic bag underneath towel - Tatonka Alcohol Burner (fullish meths) - 160g
Leatherman - Skeletool - 130g
Flat black pouch - Honey Stove - 450g
Pile of clothes:
Waterproof trousers - Some cheap brand - 250g
Spare warm trousers - Some walking brand - 510g
Waterproof jacket - NorthFace - 380g
Woolen Jumper - Swanndri - 740g
Green pouch - DD Tarp 3mx3m - 790g
Black pouch - Hennessy Hammock Ultralite - 900g
Brew kit - Morrisons coffee with whitener and sugar, tea bags and separate whitener, hot chocolate - 200g
Pouch with mesh - Fire kit (see below for detail) - 390g

The softie autumn does me from March to Nov but I do run quite hot and don't feel the cold as bad as some.

Crusdaer mug doubles as cooking pot with hanger in possibles pouch.

Termarest is small in length but I don't find that an issue warmth wise or comfort wise.

I might chuck the Leatherman but it can be useful and doubles as a redundancy for the mora.

Honey Stoves rock, even if they do get fiddly when they warp, I find they boil 1/4 liter for a brew in less the 5 mins and extra bonus is they can take many fuel sources. I carry spare Hammaro tinder card in the pouch too.

Tatonka alcohol burner is a backup for if I can't find twigs to feed Honey Stove.

Spent a lot on the waterproof jacket to get the size / weight down but still have it do a good job, not so much on the trousers as I don't tend to use them much.

Swanndri's I love around the fire, I hate wearing my waterproof around burning embers!

DD Tarp I use to extend my living area and work under when conditions are bad.

Fire Pouch:



The pouch itself is the pouch from the Lifeventure towel with a zip lock bag to keep everything waterproof.

Starting top left:
Rubber tire - As emergency tinder, works same as inner tube

Hammaro tinder card - Starts from a spark and gives a great heart to the fire

Lite My Fire fire lighters - As emergency tinder or for Honey Stove for emergency brew (important for recovery from hypothermia threat, can make all the difference)

Traditional flint and steel - A luxury because I enjoy using it with natural tinders and testing myself

Hacksaw blade - As a spare sticker from my fire steel (fire steel as part of my EDC, see below)

Matches - in a box and in a camera film case dipped in wax for extra security from water.

Jet flame lighter - For emergency tinder ignition.

This usually does it for me but I might add in char cloth, cotton wool, Vaseline etc. I tend to stick with fire steel and Hammaro for day to day requirements.

Wash kit:



Yellow pouch - small first aid kit with plasters etc (mainly a blister kit)

Vaseline - for chapped anything and as a good firelighting extra

Imodium - for my number 1 bug out illness!

Tooth brush

TCP hand sanitizer - I'm going to change to alcohol gel to get the added bonus of additional fire lighting material when this foam runs out.

Soap leaves - dissolve really easily in the palm of your hand, provide a manageable lather and don't make a mess.

Toothpaste

Possibles kit:



Midge net - 101 uses

Romer - because I'm bad at estimating grid references

Spork - light and effective

Silver space blanket - good for shelter building use

Spare boot laces

Crusader mug hanger - for use over the fire

Crusader mug lid - improves boil time

Paracord - in donut, lots

DC3 Sharpener - a sharp knife is a safe knife

Pencil sharpener - sharpens pencils but also produces good dry tinder from sticks

Whistle - for emergency use and to give to my daughter so I feel more comfortable when she wanders off

Rite in the rain notepad

Pencils

Lighter

Head torch batteries

Head torch

Collapsible hand saw

I do have the obligatory Gransfors Small Forest Axe but rarely take it out due to the illegality and I can pretty much do everything I'd ever need to with the saw.

I've got rid of loads of guff from this kit recently, this is what I actually use.

Weight excluding bergen - 10865g or 10.9 Kg

Weight including bergen - 14825g or 14.8 Kg

In my Every Day Carry (EDC) I have:



Camping SAK (Swiss Army Knife)

Fire steel

(These I have attached on a Wegner quick release keyring and chain which I keep attached to my belt loop and in my pocket)

Paracord bracelet

Timex Expedition watch

Zippo

Cash & credit card holder

Phone (v.important, I hope to replace with a SPOT Personal Tracker at some point)

When I'm out I'll also carry on me:

Compass

Map

Pack size is my main issue, the sleeping bag, thermarest, swanndri all take up too much room. I'd like to be able to move down a pack size or two, new down sleeping bag next I think.

I've also just ordered a Nanok SF Reversible jacket which might replace the Swanndri for the really cold months and serve as an extension to the sleeping bag.

And my good lady wife just ordered a Platypus Insulator Hydration Pack Big Zip 2 litre and Aquaguard Eliminator In-Line Hydration filter to go with it (30th b'day pressie), that should sort water but there's also chemicals in the first aid kit. I think I'll get the Aquaguard lifestraw to keep about my person for emergency water.

Thanks for looking :)
 

Twodogs

Maker Plus
Nov 16, 2008
5,302
56
West Midland
www.facebook.com
Greetings folks :)

Im off to Norway in just over a week to do a bit of hiking around the Nordmarka area in Oslo so heres my kit for the trip ,

My pack for this trip is my new shiny lowe alpine salient 70 lts of joy ,



Something to sleep under my Helsport lavvulight ,



Sleeping on and in , Jerven thermo xl, poncho liner and multimat adventure mat all this folds flat into my pack ,


Cooking as the fire bans in place now in Norway is going to be cooking on meths that will be brought in country,
Trangia trangle , trangia burner , Egor .8 litre kettle , kuksa spoon ,windsheld and mora

Food mainly Turmat rations brought on my last trip plus loads of brew kit lunch time snacks will be brought in Norway ,

All the cooking kit and food pack into a PLCE side pouch with all the zips and straps removed to save weight ,

This keeps all the cooking kit and food nice and tight and were I want them right at the top of the pack ,

Water , I use a 4 litre orblieb bag plus a 5 litre orblieb folding bucket thats ideal for collecting water from lakes and streams , water proof pack liner and a lightweight pack cover this I use to cover my bergen when it goes though airline baggage to give it a bit of protection as I only leave the grab handle exposed ,

Bits and bobs ,I carry a small pouch with a insect head net , insect repelant , head torch with fresh battery fitted but one removed in transit and a spare lighter ,

Wash kit ,
small pine tar soap , tooth brush , half a small tube of tooth paste , towel , FOOT POWDER ( this is a must ) pack of tissues and pain killers .

Spare clothes for the return trip ,
as lightweight as possable with an extra bag packed for dirty washing as and when, all packed in another pag to keep it tight .

Bit of warm kit , swanndri shirt , merkat pelt hat and my Arktis waterproof smock that I will be wearing .

Admin and more bits and bobs ,
passport, local cash, boarding passes and tickets , notebook with any local train timings needed ,local map , compass , GPS set to local grid system , UCO micro candle lantern ( Cheers Gordy :)) spare candles , piece of cordage for attaching lantern to lavvu pole :) pair of steiners , sunglasses ,


Thats all folks

Twodogs
 
Last edited:

mousey

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jun 15, 2010
2,210
252
39
NE Scotland
I don't know if many people will look at this thread again including the chap who started it [almost a year a go looking at the dates] but the insulation tape on the metal mug to help prevent burning lips when drinking hot fuilds is a cracking idea. Also the chopping board, as already praised by a few, I think in a good one too.

Picking up little ideas like those makes browsing older/ miscellanous threads worthwhile.
 

Smith28

Nomad
Nov 26, 2010
441
0
South East
I don't know if many people will look at this thread again including the chap who started it [almost a year a go looking at the dates] but the insulation tape on the metal mug to help prevent burning lips when drinking hot fuilds is a cracking idea. Also the chopping board, as already praised by a few, I think in a good one too.

Picking up little ideas like those makes browsing older/ miscellanous threads worthwhile.
Totally agreed dude. I'm subbed to this thread and others like it for that very reason - just in case anyone has any other bright ideas to chip in.
 

Recon369

Member
Nov 26, 2011
28
0
Western Canada
I have to disagree about the fire stiker as un-neccesary, it is a survival essential. 3 forms of fire making, survival rule of 3. Every year here in the mountains (Canada & US) they pull out casualties that got into trouble by not taking needed gear with them.
 

Oarsnpaddle

Forager
May 24, 2010
128
0
Greater Copenhagen
I have to disagree about the fire stiker as un-neccesary, it is a survival essential. 3 forms of fire making, survival rule of 3. Every year here in the mountains (Canada & US) they pull out casualties that got into trouble by not taking needed gear with them.
Shouldn't three lighters and some dry paper do the trick?

Yes, I do carry a fire striker, but more because I use it light my stove(s) than anything else. I also carry three-five small non-refillable lighters as well as a jet lighter (I smoke hand rolled cigarettes - a working lighter is a must).
 
Last edited:

beenn

Banned
Nov 16, 2009
1,092
0
South Wales
Shouldn't three lighters and some dry paper do the trick?

Yes, I do carry a fire striker, but more because I use it light my stove(s) than anything else. I also carry three-five small non-refillable lighters as well as a jet lighter (I smoke hand rolled cigarettes - a working lighter is a must).
Gas can freeze, plastic on lighter can break, flint on lighter can go, electric lighters only last so long etc.

A fire striker just strikes, everytime.
 

Oarsnpaddle

Forager
May 24, 2010
128
0
Greater Copenhagen
Gas can freeze, plastic on lighter can break, flint on lighter can go, electric lighters only last so long etc.
Hence you carry at least one on your person, and if it's that cold, you carry two. My jet lighter is not an electric lighter. It uses a piezo for ignition.


A fire striker just strikes, everytime.
Yes, hence my use of it to light my stoves. However, to light a fire, it's not enough to just get some sparks. You need tinder and whatnot to catch the spark and whatnot. A lighter is much easier.

Yes, I know, it's the wrong forum to sing the praise of lighters, but since I smoke I'm very much aware of how to handle a lighter and keep it working in cold and wet conditions. My firestriker will continue to be used solely for lighting my stoves - yes, that includeds my gas stoves.
 

beenn

Banned
Nov 16, 2009
1,092
0
South Wales
Hence you carry at least one on your person, and if it's that cold, you carry two. My jet lighter is not an electric lighter. It uses a piezo for ignition.




Yes, hence my use of it to light my stoves. However, to light a fire, it's not enough to just get some sparks. You need tinder and whatnot to catch the spark and whatnot. A lighter is much easier.

Yes, I know, it's the wrong forum to sing the praise of lighters, but since I smoke I'm very much aware of how to handle a lighter and keep it working in cold and wet conditions. My firestriker will continue to be used solely for lighting my stoves - yes, that includeds my gas stoves.
Each to their own.
 

England Ram

Tenderfoot
Dec 5, 2011
50
0
Derby
Great thread guys, again, as a newbie to all this, this type of thing is invaluable to see where I am already on track, or needing to change tac:)
 

Recon369

Member
Nov 26, 2011
28
0
Western Canada
I was thinking more of:

1. Life boat matches
2. Bic Lighter
3. Flint Striker

I also Carry regular wood strike anywhere matches with my stove and use a zippo for my cigs.
 

realearner

Forager
Sep 26, 2011
200
0
kent
Being a newbie to bushcraft I have read this thread with the utmost interest. Loved the start and it is very well put together and informative, and stresses that all kit is personal..
As for fire lighting, as far as I can tell you need to carry three different styles of lighting, and different types of tinder. If natural tinder is readily available use that first.
Anyway as for the basic kit at the start of the thread, thank you for the info, and it will help me with my kit.