Suggestions for a legal carry

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fenix

Forager
Jul 8, 2008
129
91
Kent
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Carrying the Boker (2nd from bottom) at the moment, seems a good mix of size and utility, I also like the deep carry pocket clip.
 

Nice65

Full Member
Apr 16, 2009
5,508
1,974
W.Sussex
Apart from the fact that they are rather expensive, I think they are also an example of stretching the case of what is legal somewhat. I do not want to carry something I would need a barrister to explain. Nothing wrong with spyderco, I have one or two of them myself but even the smaller of them still manage to look more threatening and aggressive than more traditional penknives. I don't really like the fancy steel they are made of either, too brittle, I have broken the tip off one them, something that has never happened with an SAK.
There is no stretching the case of legality. The UKPK was designed by U.K. knife aficionados (The UKPK Design Team) to meet legal criteria but give as much knife and user safety as possible with U.K. law. It has a blade length from the end of the handle of a fraction under 3”. The law actually applies to the length of the cutting edge, but just in case any representative of the law wanted to argue it, the cutting edge measures 2 and 3/4”. It has no lock and is readily foldable at all times. Admittedly it doesn’t look as Boy Scout as a Swiss Army, but that’s not really a concern of mine. In most situations it is legal. I wouldn’t take it to a nightclub, football match, school, museum, hospital or anywhere else where it could be misconceived as a weapon.

SAKs are thicker toward the tip, but in honesty, if you’re snapping tips then you’re not using it right. Not aimed at you as such, I have two Opinels I’ve snapped the tips off and that’s a carbon tool steel. They’re just thin at the tip, it’s not really the steel.
 

fenix

Forager
Jul 8, 2008
129
91
Kent
I have a Svord Peasant, its quite nice but for its blade length it takes up a hell of a lot of pocket space.
The pointed end of the plastic handle could do with being rounded off cos it doesn't fulfill any useful function but the extended tang and of the blade needs to be there in order for a friction folder to open and it adds a lot of length to the knives closed size.
I carry the svord when out and about in the countryside (or would if I could find the bloody thing), I do have the sheath for it. I the find the size and design good for countryside type tasks, or just whittling. On a day to day basis is something smaller.
 

10_95

Full Member
Nov 10, 2021
10
14
East Dunbartonshire
I carry traditional slipjoints a lot of the time, mainly Great Eastern Cutlery. They are very well made pocket knives but only a few I would advise for harder use.
The model #73 is a nice sturdy trapper pattern in single or two blade and also the recent #86 pattern would make a good choice.
A more modern take is the Lionsteel barlows in M390 and titanium construction.
 

muttley_109

New Member
May 10, 2021
1
0
39
Pontypridd
I spent ages scouring the usual sites for a UK legal knife recently and ended up settling on a Viper Dan 2. It's a lovely looking knife, really comfortable in the hand and arrived shaving sharp. It's very solidly put together little knife. The only slight issue is that it's a little stiff to open one handed at first but seems to be easing up a bit with use.
 

MartiniDave

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Aug 29, 2003
2,355
129
59
Cambridgeshire
Whatever else I try I usually end up back with a Victorinox, mostly a Farmer, Hiker or Huntsman. Never managed to break one yet.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,359
1,349
Berlin
Tip to ricasso?
Tip to handle?
Do they indeed measure electronically the length of the edge?
 

ocean1975

Full Member
Jan 10, 2009
676
69
rochester, kent
Whitby mint is quite a nice knife,non locking and decent pocket clip.I mostly carry a swiss army camper and have done for years.Think i might be getting a leatherman squirt for Christmas.
 
Last edited:

Athos

Full Member
Mar 12, 2021
129
99
East Sussex
Apart from the fact that they are rather expensive, I think they are also an example of stretching the case of what is legal somewhat. I do not want to carry something I would need a barrister to explain. Nothing wrong with spyderco, I have one or two of them myself but even the smaller of them still manage to look more threatening and aggressive than more traditional penknives. I don't really like the fancy steel they are made of either, too brittle, I have broken the tip off one them, something that has never happened with an SAK.
Well, they are legal so I’m not really sure what you mean there. What were you doing when you broke the tip? I’ve had no problems with either of mine and they’ve seen years of daily carry and use in a marine environment.
 

Corso

Full Member
Aug 13, 2007
5,141
397
none
Apart from the fact that they are rather expensive, I think they are also an example of stretching the case of what is legal somewhat. I do not want to carry something I would need a barrister to explain.
Nope not at all, said object wouldn't get throught the CPS, never mind hit the courts

As an object if it follows the law it's fine
 

Laurentius

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Aug 13, 2009
2,084
352
Knowhere
Nope not at all, said object wouldn't get throught the CPS, never mind hit the courts

As an object if it follows the law it's fine
You say "the law" as if it is a scientific constant, but it is not, it is judged in courts and unequally applied according to status and access to legal counsel. I think you will find that many people have been convicted on the basis of confessing to something under pressure that they could have challenged had they had access to decent legal counsel, and I speak from experience here.
 

Corso

Full Member
Aug 13, 2007
5,141
397
none
You say "the law" as if it is a scientific , but it is not, it is judged in courts and unequally applied according to status and access to legal counsel. I think you will find that many people have been convicted on the basis of confessing to something under pressure that they could have challenged had they had access to decent legal counsel, and I speak from experience here.
here we go again...

Case law is a constant, the object as it is described is completely safe and within the law

Just because a PC says you've broken 'the law' and are nicked doesn't mean you are

circumstances or actions might complicate things but legal objects don't.

I'm sorry to hear you've been down that road but if you've signed to say you've broken the law you are doomed to the outcome
 
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matarius777

Member
Aug 29, 2019
19
7
56
Lancaster
Tip to ricasso?
Tip to handle?
Do they indeed measure electronically the length of the edge?
I believe a precedent has been set in British Law for the length to include the tang, even though it’s not sharp. In the legal wording, it’s the cutting part of the blade, but in court, a butter knife was somehow bought into the equation and so now we have the ridiculous situation that the wording of the law counts for nothing!☹️ So, now, if I’m going somewhere where there’s the slightest chance of having to “declare” my edc, I have to leave my trust German Army Victorinox at home, even though the cutting part of the blade meets the requirements of the law as it was originally written! The same goes for a number of other trusty knives I have..
 
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Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
5,606
4,980
Mid Wales
I believe a precedent has been set in British Law for the length to include the tang, even though it’s not sharp. In the legal wording, it’s the cutting part of the blade, but in court, a butter knife was somehow bought into the equation and so now we have the ridiculous situation that the wording of the law counts for nothing!☹️ So, now, if I’m going somewhere where there’s the slightest chance of having to “declare” my edc, I have to leave my trust German Army Victorinox at home, even though the cutting part of the blade meets the requirements of the law as it was originally written! The same goes for a number of other trusty knives I have..

I do not believe that is correct at all. The 'tang' is not part of the measurement for any folding knife or fixed blade knife with a handle. A court of law may still decide a knife is not legal (if the user cannot justify having it) if its design makes it difficult to determine where the blade ends and the handle begins (think of throwing knives for example). In addition, a court may determine that something like a 'butter knife' is illegal, not because of its design but because of any justification to have it - why would you carry a 'butter knife' in a public place?

I have a legal carry knife on me at all times unless entering places where they are prohibited (courts of law for example); I am confident in my interpretation of the law and, in general, agree with the UK knife laws.
 
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Stew

Bushcrafter through and through
Nov 29, 2003
5,815
738
Aylesbury
stewartjlight-knives.com
I believe a precedent has been set in British Law for the length to include the tang, even though it’s not sharp. In the legal wording, it’s the cutting part of the blade, but in court, a butter knife was somehow bought into the equation and so now we have the ridiculous situation that the wording of the law counts for nothing!☹️ So, now, if I’m going somewhere where there’s the slightest chance of having to “declare” my edc, I have to leave my trust German Army Victorinox at home, even though the cutting part of the blade meets the requirements of the law as it was originally written! The same goes for a number of other trusty knives I have..
I don’t believe this though if you can produce an actual case where it happened then I will accept it.
 

Stew

Bushcrafter through and through
Nov 29, 2003
5,815
738
Aylesbury
stewartjlight-knives.com
I believe a precedent has been set in British Law for the length to include the tang, even though it’s not sharp. In the legal wording, it’s the cutting part of the blade, but in court, a butter knife was somehow bought into the equation and so now we have the ridiculous situation that the wording of the law counts for nothing!☹️ So, now, if I’m going somewhere where there’s the slightest chance of having to “declare” my edc, I have to leave my trust German Army Victorinox at home, even though the cutting part of the blade meets the requirements of the law as it was originally written! The same goes for a number of other trusty knives I have..
Actually, assuming that the butter knife was a fixed blade then this makes perfect sense. There is no length limit on fixed blades. All are categorised the same. It has no bearing on slipjoint folding knives.
 

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