Stuff to carry on the Tube in London

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Garnett

Tenderfoot
Mar 6, 2007
89
0
41
London, UK
I'm moving out of London in a month or so, and I know that some proper first aid training is top of the list, but there is no time.

For the next month, does anyone have any suggestions for any items that it might be worth carrying when I'm travelling through London "just in case"? I appreciate the risks are low, that I will probably forget I'm carrying useful stuff, and in the event that something did happen, there will probably only be a short time in which things aren't being managed by people with proper training. I also admit to feeling a bit like a "prepper".

Assuming I'm conscious of, and trying to take all of the above into consideration, is there anything people would recommend?

I was thinking a torch, dust masks, foil blankets, and a couple of large trauma bandages might be worth it for the chance of actually making a bit of a difference before trained experts take over.

Thanks for any helpful suggestions.
 

Garnett

Tenderfoot
Mar 6, 2007
89
0
41
London, UK
Thanks for the reply Mesquite. Likewise - same for me up to now. Seriously think there's little point, but I have a relatively decent lightweight headtorch and the trauma bandages, and the blankets and masks are a couple of quid for packs of 5, and the the torch is the heaviest thing.

I posted in part to see whether I was being unreasonably "prepper-ish".
 

TeeDee

Full Member
Nov 6, 2008
6,643
947
47
Exeter
I posted in part to see whether I was being unreasonably "prepper-ish".

I'd say considering the current situation and Government suggested warning level its a sane decision to have a consider such possibilites.

Suggestion - if you remove the imposed connected connations/stigma typically associated with being a 'Prepper' would you then internally justify it yourself?
 

Garnett

Tenderfoot
Mar 6, 2007
89
0
41
London, UK
Those are good points, which I'm trying to reconcile. My question is essentially, "Is there anything worth carrying which could be used (not necessarily by me) without training that might make a difference?"

The only item I've thought of so far and regards which training may be an issue is the trauma bandage - my thought is, if there's a massive wound, then in the time it takes emergency services to arrive, applying a massive bandage and pressure might actually make a difference.
 

TeeDee

Full Member
Nov 6, 2008
6,643
947
47
Exeter
Those are good points, which I'm trying to reconcile. My question is essentially, "Is there anything worth carrying which could be used (not necessarily by me) without training that might make a difference?"

The only item I've thought of so far and regards which training may be an issue is the trauma bandage - my thought is, if there's a massive wound, then in the time it takes emergency services to arrive, applying a massive bandage and pressure might actually make a difference.

A C-A-T is the only other thing I'd consider taking.

http://combattourniquet.com/

Not so sure if others without experience could use it to be beneficial however.
 
Last edited:

beachlover

Full Member
Aug 28, 2004
2,309
153
Isle of Wight
Perhaps ignore this if you wear glasses, but consider a shatterproof pair of shades. You'll be damn all use to yourself or anyone else without your eyes and potentially there is an awful lot of glass and other shrapnel to fly about.
And who knows, there might even be some sunshine! :)
 

pysen78

Forager
Oct 10, 2013
201
0
Stockholm
Most of the time, to me, being prepared means giving/lending my stuff to others who are worse off than myself. (Managed to nab your jacket when the fire alarm went off? Sure enough, shivering next you in the drizzle, someone in a mini skirt will be needing it more than you.)

I'm not trained enough to make the most of a FAK in a panic situation, but someone else might. The trained nurse who happens to be on the same train as me might not have brought enough to help more than one or two people, so my kit may help her do a better job. And so on. I'm not a prepper, but being prepared for a clear and present danger is not over the top. It's just augmenting the odds in case of emergency.
 
Nov 29, 2004
7,808
7
Scotland
A chum in London suggested water, a torch and a shemagh or scarf.

I'm with Mesquite in that I'd think my oyster card or ticket should be all I'd really need.

I do wear a shemagh when the weather is cold but in the event of a 'just in case' type situation I'd probably whip it off pretty quickly. :)

Water. Have some water with you always, if you are in a train and it gets stopped and you have to sit between stations for any length of time you will get thirsty pretty quickly, especially if its the rush hour.
 

Wayne

BCUK Welfare Officer
Mod
Dec 7, 2003
3,472
333
48
West Sussex
www.forestknights.co.uk
My thoughts are is the tube journey really necessary? Lot journeys on the tube can easily be walking distance or cycled.

Avoidance of the higher value tube stations, maybe get off a stop early choose when to travel to avoid the biggest crowds.

Risk wise you're much more likely to be run over my a black cab than blown up.

I normally carry a small torch on my keys and a rescue me tool. I have a tiny first aid kit that wouldn't do much in a mass casualty situation. Water and a snack.
 

Tonyuk

Settler
Nov 30, 2011
899
55
Scotland
The problem with a blast in a tube station is that its an enclosed area, effectively increasing the power of even a small device, as well as insulating to raise heat / prevent smoke clearing. Good items to carry would be, A whistle, a swiss army style tool, some water, a small torch & ID with emergency contact names, also, have a look when your walking about for the emergency exits. Pretty commonsense stuff really, you could carry a dust mask if you want, but most people could pull their t-shirt or other clothing up and over their mouths for an effective cover. I'm assuming you would carry the mask in some form of case or bag? If so, remember if a blast does knock you on your feet, your chances to find it, open it, and remove the mask, while everyone around is in a panic trying to get out is slim (especially if the lights went out), and the time taken up to find it etc.. would be better spent being the first out.

Tonyuk
 

TeeDee

Full Member
Nov 6, 2008
6,643
947
47
Exeter
Definitely a Head torch - My imagination is throwing up a few scenarios and doing any of them in the dark is not going to be easy.
 

John Fenna

Lifetime Member & Maker
Oct 7, 2006
22,039
1,553
63
Pembrokeshire
I am following this thread with interest - the station bombed in Brussels was one I used to use a lot when I lived and worked in Brussels....
 

Fraxinus

Settler
Oct 26, 2008
935
30
Canterbury
My advice, for what it is worth.

Don't use the tube.

I have hated the very few times I have used it and when several years ago I had to do some work at the Ivy I chose to walk from Victoria Station. What a pleasant walk that was, never used them since.

Why anyone wants to work in London and pay through their nose for the "privilege" just to go to work is beyond me and( most of) the companies could easily be based "out of town" and save small fortunes too.
That is before we look at any terrorist type scenarios.

Rob.
 

Laurentius

Native
Aug 13, 2009
1,944
232
Knowhere
Generally speaking, when I use the tube, (which I avoid as much as possible because I am claustrophobic) I am wearing urban style clothes which means not a lot of bulky pockets. I carry a Led Lenser P3 torch on my belt in it's pouch and a bottle of water. On my key ring I have my leatherman squirt. I generally carry a small FAK but nothing elaborate, contains a few plasters, tape, tweezers etc. and ibuprofen for my arthritis. Only good for minor cuts, not major trauma, but I guess I could use my leatherman to cut clothes into bandages if needed. Not so much a prepper as be prepared.

And of course my trusty antler handled walking stick to fend off the bad guys :)
 

Laurentius

Native
Aug 13, 2009
1,944
232
Knowhere
My advice, for what it is worth.

Don't use the tube.

I have hated the very few times I have used it and when several years ago I had to do some work at the Ivy I chose to walk from Victoria Station. What a pleasant walk that was, never used them since.

Why anyone wants to work in London and pay through their nose for the "privilege" just to go to work is beyond me and( most of) the companies could easily be based "out of town" and save small fortunes too.
That is before we look at any terrorist type scenarios.

Rob.

I'll use the bus wherever I can as I like to see where I am going, but for certain journeys the tube is unavoidable cos the bus takes so long in traffic.
 

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