Starter Kit recommendations

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welshviking

New Member
Jun 8, 2021
4
4
42
cwmbran
Hi All.

New to BC and keen to get going but looking for recommendations on starter kit. looking to get tried an tested views on fairly cheap kit ( clothing, shelters, cookware the lot ) to start me off... I'd rather not be one of the 'all the gear, no idea.' kinda guys.

Cheers!

B
 
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Mesquite

Anyone for sailing?
Mar 5, 2008
25,208
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~Hemel Hempstead~
If you're looking for tried and tested and reasonably cheap you can't go wrong with army surplus for clothing. For a knife get yourself a mora clipper. They're cheap, robust and you won't cry if you muck the grind up learning to sharpen it properly.

Cookware? Well a pot is a pot but Zebra billy cans are good quality.

Shelter depends on whether you want to sleep in a hamock, a tent or under a tarp. Once you know that then you'll know what to look at
 
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Oliver G

Full Member
Sep 15, 2012
343
231
Melbourne, Derbyshire
It might be worth popping over to one of the meets for a day, I'm sure there's people who have spare gear that they wouldn't mind swapping for a crate of beer. Plus you get to put faces to names.

Kind regards,

Ollie
 

Tengu

Full Member
Jan 10, 2006
11,494
809
48
Wiltshire
I got most of my stuff from Car boots.

Freecycle is often hand too (I dont use it)

There is a lot of good, and not so good stuff on the market, -you need to experiment.

Just come back from holiday, using my favourite tent, -not a fancy one. Urban Escape Sukhoi.

I found the recept recently. Ive had it ten years.

But I look after it and it will be good for a few years yet.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,035
1,187
Berlin
Yes, indeed, thinking about the perfect starter kit is my passion that I follow since 35 years. That's probably the Boy Scout Leader Syndrom.

Generally you have three good options:

1.) You can start with the stuff you already own or can find in attic and shed of your family and friends, at flea markets and in thrift shops and especially military surplus shops. In the first moment that's the cheapest option. But you surely will upgrade that equipment later and probably will spend more in the end because you will buy everything twice.

2.) You get all you need as used military surplus equipment in the best conditions you can find. If you take it from the own army you will surely make the best deal, although that doesn't mean that the army of your country necessarily issues the equipment that's the most practical for civil use.
Military equipment, especially NATO equipment is built to last for decades in the storage and of course the hard use in a war. If you get such stuff in good conditions it surely will last you a lifetime in civil use. Usual middle priced civil outdoor equipment, that would cost you the same or far more, usually lasts surprisingly short, some 5 years, some 10 or 15 years perhaps. It degrades by aging in your storage and also will be worn off pretty soon if used regularly. Of course there are a few exceptions from this general rule.

3.) You get immediatly the best offered new equipment, buy once, cry once!

But well informed by experienced friends you choose the cheapest of the very good stuff. And they keep in mind that you probably start now as a soloist, but later will continue with a friend or as a couple.
You can buy immediatly a 2 person pot for example.

That's sensible for example for most west European students. You buy your equipment and outdoor clothing in civil looking but muted colours, can use most of it in civil life too, can use it for mixed journeys where you go for hiking somewhere but also visit hostels in interesting towns and so on. Let's call it a civil looking heavy duty world travel equipment.
Depending on the single item most of it will last you for decades or all your life and to be honest you don't need much more than it, apart from your university books, a computer or equally used stuff you need for your job.
You now use what you own, save up your money step by step, get the missing pieces at first, replace slowly the existing clothing and other stuff. You live with your top equipment a minimalist lifestyle in your student apartment and in the university as well as in the woods at the end of your bus line or on backpacking and hiking tours during your holydays.

You just own one pot and use it everywhere if you cook, you sleep also at home in your sleeping bag, you wear your bushcraft clothing in town as well as in the woods.

Like this, the investment might be a bit higher, but because that is all you really need, it is indeed by far the cheapest option one can choose, and for the average student who is interested in backpacking, traveling and bushcraft too that's for sure the best option, because apart from the above mentioned points it is an education program that makes people independent and free minded.

Of course. If you know, really know because you are used to that life, that you just need what you can carry in your rucksack (and your laptop and a bit other stuff in a robust second bag perhaps) you are a free and absolutely independent man.

Below I show you a list that is selected having point 3.) in mind, and the items are world wide always easily available because that is factory new current production or everywhere offered military surplus equipment.

One can lower the costs significantly if the below listed new more expensive items are replaced by similar used military surplus pieces of equipment, what is currently easily possible for a British citizen because similar good quality stuff is currently very well available in British military surplus shops.

I suggest that you look through this list, think about which items you already own and what you need to buy, calculate the prices and come back here.

There are of course cheaper but reasonable other options that I can tell you after you told me which equipment you need to buy in the first moment to get started with hiking and bushcraft and your budget.

One can of course just order what's listed below and it will work very well and most of it for many years. But we can also just use the list as a starting point to think about your individual needs, your individual budget and the current offers in British military surplus shops.

The items that I recommend below are reasonably priced top quality equipment in top cut and construction, it isn't the most expensive on the world market but belongs to the best of the best one can choose.

If we digg through the current offers of the surplus shops we surely can find also very well working also very long lasting very good equipment for a fraction of the prices of the equipment below.

Nobody is too poor to get immediatly started with bushcraft. The question is just where and for what the equipment will be used.


Starter Kit

Packing list for use in the warmer month.
You just should cover all needs technically.
Product recommendations are meant in case that you don't own already a similar item.

Rucksack (Karrimor SF Sabre 45 with side pouches)
Bin bag as Rucksack liner


Stuffed to the bottom of the main compartment:
Sleeping bag (Snugpak Special Forces 1)
(It fits in the)
Bivvy bag
(Snugpak Special Forces)
(and both together very well into the Ortlieb drybag PS10, grey, 7 litres)
On top of it in the main compartment:
Little bag (Ortlieb drybag PS10, black, 7 litres)
It is used as pillow too during the night,
containing the following:
- Jacket (Solognac fleece jacket 300)
- Spare underwear 1X Breefs and T-shirt
- Woolen spare socks 1X (Quecha SH 500 merino)
- Swimming shorts 1X


On top of it in the main compartment, but outside the liner:
Tarp and Rainsuit
Or better real Military Poncho

(German, Austrian, Dutch or US army, the Italian army poncho is available new from Defcon 5 and by far the lightest)


On top of it, outside but under the flap:
Roll mat (Austrian, Dutch, or US army used British army mat is available as MULTIMAT NATO MAT new)
Closed cell foam


In the flap pocket:
Cordage (Edelrid Multicord 2,5 mm orange)
2x 3 metres / 2x 10 feet should be enough for the poncho, 1,5 metres / 5 feet for the tripod
Cigarette lighter (Bic)
Candle as fire starter, in a plastic bag.
A few drips of wax on the twigs help a lot!
Toilet paper (in a zipp lock freezer bag)
Also for cleaning the pot a bit.
Wash kit (in a zipp lock freezer bag)
Folding tooth brush, tooth paste, soap in a small bottle (Sea to Summit Bodywash 3 floz / 89 ml), razor (Wilkinson's orange), wrapped into a small mircofibre towel (Nabaji size S)
Topographical map 1:50 000 (in a zipp lock freezer bag)
Compass (Suunto M9 wrist band compass)
Head lamp (Petzl e+ lite)


Side pouch left:
Full tang knife (Morakniv Garberg stainless steel with leather sheath)
Water bottle (2x) with (1x) nesting
Mug (and belt pouch)
(US army or other military surplus or Lixada 750 ml stainless steel mug with bail and butterfly handles and Nalgene Everyday 32 oz / 1 litre wide mouth, clear)


Side pouch right:
Pot (Pathfinder Bushpot 64 oz /1800 ml)
Put it into a cotton or plastic bag, because it would make your other equipment dirty.
Cooking chaine 3 feet / 1 metre, with open hooks in the ends. You hang with it your pot under a tripod. And / or a gas stove, for example Alpkit Kraku.
Spoon (A usual stainless steel spoon from the flea market.)
Cotton Handkerchief
Several times folded usable as pot holder and pre filter before water purification by boiling.
Food
The pot works as mouse proof container outside the rucksack and separated from it during the night.

ON THE MAN:

Hiking boots (Meindl Ortler or Schladminger 100)
Woolen Socks (Quecha SH 500 merino)
Underwear
Trousers or Shorts
(Solognac Steppe 300 or shorts 100)
Belt (Solognac Belt 100)
Cigarette lighter (Bic)
Purse / wallet As simple and light as possible.
House keys Attached with cordage to the belt.
T-shirt (Solognac 100)
Shirt (Buttoned long sleeve shirt with two pockets and flaps over it. German army shirt, olive, by Anton Bloechel)

More you don't need.

For longer journeys a Victorinox Compact would be a sensible investment, because it is the best way to carry nail scissors and contains other very practical little tools. I carry it in the right trousers pocket, attached with cordage to the belt.)
 
Last edited:

SaraR

Full Member
Mar 25, 2017
789
493
Ceredigion
Hi All.

New to BC and keen to get going but looking for recommendations on starter kit. looking to get tried an tested views on fairly cheap kit ( clothing, shelters, cookware the lot ) to start me off... I'd rather not be one of the 'all the gear, no idea.' kinda guys.

Cheers!

B
You can use a lot of what you have already and what works for one person doesn't suit everyone, so I suggest thinking about what you want to try first and only buy something bushcraft specific if you really need to. Then as you explore more, you'll probably end up buying specialised kit for it.

I assume you have a rain coat of some description, or even just a sturdier jacket, some trousers that you don't mind getting slightly dirty if sitting on the ground and some kind of footwear that will survive a field or forest. That's all you need to do bushcraft for a lot of the year in the UK.! :)

There's nothing wrong with bringing a thermoflask for your hot beverages, of using a small camping stove to heat things up. Similarly, your normal cutlery will work fine in the outdoors, as will a travel mug, plastic cup or even a ceramic mug. A ceramic breakfast bowl works well as a plate, but many have plastic bowls or picnic plates already.

If you want to start a fire, lighters are handy and most people have one around the house already. Learn to make fires with that, then get a fire lighter if you want to. That way you already know how to keep the fire alive once you get a spark smoldering.

I'm not trying to stop you from going on an enjoyable shopping spree, just pointing out that at the end of the day, going out and exploring is more important than having all the gear. Any backpack or tote bag can be used to carry your stuff from the car to the woods, and so on.

Also pick one activity that interests you and build from that. :D
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
5,141
4,493
Mid Wales
100% with SaraR on this - any T shirt, any jumper, any jacket (ideally waterproof or at least shower proof), any trousers - good sturdy footwear. Getting out, trying, learning, making mistakes in a safe environment, is the way to progress; Ideally with more experienced people.

Bushcraft is a set of skills applied to the enjoyment of other outdoor activities; you will buy specialised kit when you've chosen the outdoor activity you most want to get into - cycling, canoeing, walking - or, just plain sitting around a camp fire chatting :) - a 'standard' bushcraft list doesn't exist IMO.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,035
1,187
Berlin
I didn't need a First Aid Kit as a very active boy scout leader in more than a decade.
I would pack it if going out with teenagers or children but don't carry one for myself.

Who is unable to work securely with a knife and tends to slip always and everywhere probably needs it.

But I recommend to invest a lot of time into first aid courses and also life guard swimming courses.
And there you should always ask what to do if you have no first aid kit with you. For most problems there also is such a solution.
 
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MikeeMiracle

Full Member
Aug 2, 2019
239
102
44
Northampton
I have seen numerous instances of first time wild camping going out, enjoying it lots, then the night comes and it's time to sleep and all the positive vibes are undone by being cold. The "night" will make or break your experience. I would focus on the sleep system, shelter, sleeping bag, sleeping mat. Your sleeping bag is the main thing here, its the last line of defence against the cold and the most important, do not go out with a rubbish bag. It doesn't have to cost a lot and like others have suggested ex army gear is solid, dependable and cheap. Get the sleep system right when going out the first time to ensure you enjoy it, everything else can be bought later. Bottled water and snacks can surfice for now until you feel it's definitely for you and will save you spending a bunch of money on gear which you may not re-use if you feel it's not for you.
 
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TLM

Native
Nov 16, 2019
1,895
870
Vantaa, Finland
One can also use Erbswurst's list as a checklist what is needed, it has very good coverage. Just in case one does not want to buy everything; his recommendations are good and represent very good value for the money both quality wise and weight wise. It is trekking or moving oriented so if one is not going to walk very far most things can be changed for a heavier cheaper version with the reminder that then a slightly larger pack is probably needed ...
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,035
1,187
Berlin
Yes, but the packing list is so short, that it would be portable with almost everything one would find in attic and shed.

But if one invests money one can of course also get the best lightweight versions. Sensible for hiking, but also if one wants to fly somewhere.
 

punkrockcaveman

Full Member
Jan 28, 2017
958
775
yorks
A victorinox Swiss army knife is a good bit of kit, embarrassingly I've only had one a year but I've been doing outdoorsy stuff for 15 plus years. Get one with a saw, you can probably get one for 20 quid with the added bonus of it being a legal carry.

I echo the thoughts about a good night's sleep. A good sleeping bag will help and so will a good mat. A tarp, particularly a square one makes a very good shelter. Go atleast 3 metres by 3 metres and you will give yourself a very versatile and sizable shelter.

Everything else kit wise can change depending on what the the trip calls for, even my sleep kit to be honest, sometimes I'm in the hammock sometimes I'm on the ground. Sometimes you need to boil your own water, and sometimes your not even cooking food at all.
 

welshviking

New Member
Jun 8, 2021
4
4
42
cwmbran
Thanks Erbswurst
Yes, indeed, thinking about the perfect starter kit is my passion that I follow since 35 years. That's probably the Boy Scout Leader Syndrom.

Generally you have three good options:

1.) You can start with the stuff you already own or can find in attic and shed of your family and friends, at flea markets and in thrift shops and especially military surplus shops. In the first moment that's the cheapest option. But you surely will upgrade that equipment later and probably will spend more in the end because you will buy everything twice.

2.) You get all you need as used military surplus equipment in the best conditions you can find. If you take it from the own army you will surely make the best deal, although that doesn't mean that the army of your country necessarily issues the equipment that's the most practical for civil use.
Military equipment, especially NATO equipment is built to last for decades in the storage and of course the hard use in a war. If you get such stuff in good conditions it surely will last you a lifetime in civil use. Usual middle priced civil outdoor equipment, that would cost you the same or far more, usually lasts surprisingly short, some 5 years, some 10 or 15 years perhaps. It degrades by aging in your storage and also will be worn off pretty soon if used regularly. Of course there are a few exceptions from this general rule.

3.) You get immediatly the best offered new equipment, buy once, cry once!

But well informed by experienced friends you choose the cheapest of the very good stuff. And they keep in mind that you probably start now as a soloist, but later will continue with a friend or as a couple.
You can buy immediatly a 2 person pot for example.

That's sensible for example for most west European students. You buy your equipment and outdoor clothing in civil looking but muted colours, can use most of it in civil life too, can use it for mixed journeys where you go for hiking somewhere but also visit hostels in interesting towns and so on. Let's call it a civil looking heavy duty world travel equipment.
Depending on the single item most of it will last you for decades or all your life and to be honest you don't need much more than it, apart from your university books, a computer or equally used stuff you need for your job.
You now use what you own, save up your money step by step, get the missing pieces at first, replace slowly the existing clothing and other stuff. You live with your top equipment a minimalist lifestyle in your student apartment and in the university as well as in the woods at the end of your bus line or on backpacking and hiking tours during your holydays.

You just own one pot and use it everywhere if you cook, you sleep also at home in your sleeping bag, you wear your bushcraft clothing in town as well as in the woods.

Like this, the investment might be a bit higher, but because that is all you really need, it is indeed by far the cheapest option one can choose, and for the average student who is interested in backpacking, traveling and bushcraft too that's for sure the best option, because apart from the above mentioned points it is an education program that makes people independent and free minded.

Of course. If you know, really know because you are used to that life, that you just need what you can carry in your rucksack (and your laptop and a bit other stuff in a robust second bag perhaps) you are a free and absolutely independent man.

Below I show you a list that is selected having point 3.) in mind, and the items are world wide always easily available because that is factory new current production or everywhere offered military surplus equipment.

One can lower the costs significantly if the below listed new more expensive items are replaced by similar used military surplus pieces of equipment, what is currently easily possible for a British citizen because similar good quality stuff is currently very well available in British military surplus shops.

I suggest that you look through this list, think about which items you already own and what you need to buy, calculate the prices and come back here.

There are of course cheaper but reasonable other options that I can tell you after you told me which equipment you need to buy in the first moment to get started with hiking and bushcraft and your budget.

One can of course just order what's listed below and it will work very well and most of it for many years. But we can also just use the list as a starting point to think about your individual needs, your individual budget and the current offers in British military surplus shops.

The items that I recommend below are reasonably priced top quality equipment in top cut and construction, it isn't the most expensive on the world market but belongs to the best of the best one can choose.

If we digg through the current offers of the surplus shops we surely can find also very well working also very long lasting very good equipment for a fraction of the prices of the equipment below.

Nobody is too poor to get immediatly started with bushcraft. The question is just where and for what the equipment will be used.


Starter Kit

Packing list for use in the warmer month.
You just should cover all needs technically.
Product recommendations are meant in case that you don't own already a similar item.

Rucksack (Karrimor SF Sabre 45 with side pouches)
Bin bag as Rucksack liner


Stuffed to the bottom of the main compartment:
Sleeping bag (Snugpak Special Forces 1)
(It fits in the)
Bivvy bag
(Snugpak Special Forces)
(and both together very well into the Ortlieb drybag PS10, grey, 7 litres)
On top of it in the main compartment:
Little bag (Ortlieb drybag PS10, black, 7 litres)
It is used as pillow too during the night,
containing the following:
- Jacket (Solognac fleece jacket 300)
- Spare underwear 1X Breefs and T-shirt
- Woolen spare socks 1X (Quecha SH 500 merino)
- Swimming shorts 1X


On top of it in the main compartment, but outside the liner:
Tarp and Rainsuit
Or better real Military Poncho

(German, Austrian, Dutch or US army, the Italian army poncho is available new from Defcon 5 and by far the lightest)


On top of it, outside but under the flap:
Roll mat (Austrian, Dutch, or US army used British army mat is available as MULTIMAT NATO MAT new)
Closed cell foam


In the flap pocket:
Cordage (Edelrid Multicord 2,5 mm orange)
2x 3 metres / 2x 10 feet should be enough for the poncho, 1,5 metres / 5 feet for the tripod
Cigarette lighter (Bic)
Candle as fire starter, in a plastic bag.
A few drips of wax on the twigs help a lot!
Toilet paper (in a zipp lock freezer bag)
Also for cleaning the pot a bit.
Wash kit (in a zipp lock freezer bag)
Folding tooth brush, tooth paste, soap in a small bottle (Sea to Summit Bodywash 3 floz / 89 ml), razor (Wilkinson's orange), wrapped into a small mircofibre towel (Nabaji size S)
Topographical map 1:50 000 (in a zipp lock freezer bag)
Compass (Suunto M9 wrist band compass)
Head lamp (Petzl e+ lite)


Side pouch left:
Full tang knife (Morakniv Garberg stainless steel with leather sheath)
Water bottle (2x) with (1x) nesting
Mug (and belt pouch)
(US army or other military surplus or Lixada 750 ml stainless steel mug with bail and butterfly handles and Nalgene Everyday 32 oz / 1 litre wide mouth, clear)


Side pouch right:
Pot (Pathfinder Bushpot 64 oz /1800 ml)
Put it into a cotton or plastic bag, because it would make your other equipment dirty.
Cooking chaine 3 feet / 1 metre, with open hooks in the ends. You hang with it your pot under a tripod. And / or a gas stove, for example Alpkit Kraku.
Spoon (A usual stainless steel spoon from the flea market.)
Cotton Handkerchief
Several times folded usable as pot holder and pre filter before water purification by boiling.
Food
The pot works as mouse proof container outside the rucksack and separated from it during the night.

ON THE MAN:

Hiking boots (Meindl Ortler or Schladminger 100)
Woolen Socks (Quecha SH 500 merino)
Underwear
Trousers or Shorts
(Solognac Steppe 300 or shorts 100)
Belt (Solognac Belt 100)
Cigarette lighter (Bic)
Purse / wallet As simple and light as possible.
House keys Attached with cordage to the belt.
T-shirt (Solognac 100)
Shirt (Buttoned long sleeve shirt with two pockets and flaps over it. German army shirt, olive, by Anton Bloechel)

More you don't need.

For longer journeys a Victorinox Compact would be a sensible investment, because it is the best way to carry nail scissors and contains other very practical little tools. I carry it in the right trousers pocket, attached with cordage to the belt.)
Thanks for this info... its a great list and will have me having a good rummage around for some deals.
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,035
1,187
Berlin


These Dutch army Sting rucksacks are very similar, but larger. The Karrimor SF Sabre 45 is rather a summer and 3 seasons rucksack for British climate and circumstances, the Dutch army Sting rucksacks are rather 3 season and mild winter rucksacks.
The Karrimor SF Sabre 45 has 45 litres in the main rucksack plus 2x 12,5 = 25 litres in the side pouches, together 70 litres. The Dutch army Sting rucksack has 60 litres capacity in the main rucksack plus approximately 2x10 litres in the side pouches, altogether rather 80 litres. And you can attach here via the MOLLE system on the belly of the rucksack even more additional little pouches, for example Dutch army or British army MTP Osprey 2x water bottle pouches and the slightly smaller utility (all purpose) pouches with additional draw string snow collar under the flap that avoid loosing small items, what is very handy for camping and less far hiking or especially for traveling in car, bus and train and in camps but adds a bit unneeded weight to the complete system as these pouches are relatively heavy compared to lightweight bags for inner organisation. For more static camping that's a great option nevertheless, as you can better reach your army water bottles and mug and pack your washkit and small micro fibre towel seperated. And you could also put into a fourth pouch some kitchen stuff like cooking chaine, stove, spices or whatever, a lightweight hammock also would fit here well.

"A place for everything and always everything in it's place" is top secret No1 if you want to spend a recreational time.
These smaller additional pouches help a lot to keep your stuff well assorted.

But anyway both rucksacks can be recommended and both options are a good deal, although the invested amount of money is very different.

Dutch generation 1 needs Dutch generation 1 side pouches. Generation 2 is interchangable with British army PLCE side pouches.

Attention:
The Karrimor SF Sabre 45 has no adjustable back carrying system!
It is built for the average Brit. Neither for dwarves nor for giants.

The Dutch army rucksacks have an adjustable back carrying system and also fit onto small and very tall persons.
As a tall person also needs a larger sleeping bag and clothing it's in this case no fault to get also a slightly bigger rucksack. And the slightly higher weight doesn't matter in this case, because a tall guy also can carry it easily.

If we talk about the average beginner, a young healthy and sporty man, the weight of the loaded rucksack isn't so horrible important anyway. That doesn't mean, that he shouldn't pay a bit attention which weight has new bought equipment, because the lower the weight, the more comfortable the rucksack will ride on your shoulders of course.
And a usual beginner's fault is to think, that one can carry every summer soloist equipment easily. If you go for camping in the colder month the stuff suddenly becomes pretty heavy all together.
And a nice cute girl friend also suddenly can change totally the game, as you now have to carry additional a two man tent of approximately 3 kg and additional water and food. As she usually is smaller than you, she carries only her personal stuff. Less tall usually means less strong and more steps per kilometre. Who is a fair gentleman doesn't use his girlfriend as a pack horse!

For summer use the Dutch Sting rucksack generation 2 is the better choice than generation 1 because it has 4 horizontal compression straps at the main compartment. That means you get it tight to your back even if it isn't full.

Generation 1 doesn't have these straps.
It's less important for static camping and winter use, but pretty important for summer hikes, especially in more complicated terrain.





The Sting also exists in a relatively rare black Dutch navy version and is currently produced in the new Dutch army camouflage pattern. Both can be found in the Netherlands if one really wants it. But the Dutch DPM woodland pattern, that's nearly identic with the British army DPM, is a very good choice for stealth camping anyway and fits well to used British field uniforms and other easily available British army equipment.

Older olive green Sting rucksacks exist too, have the old ALICE clip straps instead of the modern MOLLE system and are everything else than easily available and usually not very cheap if you can find one.
 
Last edited:

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,035
1,187
Berlin
Here we have the offer of a trusty forum member for the Dutch Sting generation 1, the colour is not so faded out as at most used army Sting rucksacks:

 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,035
1,187
Berlin
@welshviking

With pleasure, my dear!

Have a look at the prices of the stuff I mentioned in the list.

If it fits to your budget, you simply can buy that. If it doesn't fit well, come back here, tell me your budget and I will adjust my recommendations until if fits well.

I know very well what's available, and where to find the stuff and best offers.

We also can talk about what to buy first and what you could buy later.

You can for example cook first in the cheap Lixada 750 ml mug with bail and butterfly handles and buy the 1,8 litres pathfinder pot later.

For hiking you don't need the Morakniv Garberg. The Victorinox Compact is what I use 95 % of the time.

You even could just buy an Opinel No8 Carbone for the beginning. It's a great folding kitchen knife and costs next to nothing. No survival knife but a very good outdoor knife for a weekend in the Bush.
It carves very well, you just can't split wood with it, but that isn't needed in warm summer conditions.
But the Opinel No8 Carbone is fine for normal use.

And there are other options how to get started if you can't afford in one rush what I recommended in the packing list.

"Affordable" is no precise word. Affordable for a 30 years old engineer is something else than for a 20 years old student or 16 years old teenager.

What's the best material is easy to tell. What's the best way to get started with bushcraft also depends on the income.

So, have a look to the prices of the stuff I recommended in the list and afterwards a look into your piggy bank!
 
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Hultafors Outdoor knife for Sale

We have a a number of Hultafors Outdoor Knives with Firesteels for sale.

You can see more details here in this thread OUTDOOR KNIVES The price is £27 posted to the UK. Pay via the paypal button below.