simple knife straightening jig

mark.177

Maker
Apr 21, 2014
722
152
Cornwall UK
may be of interest to the knife makers? for straightening warped blades out of the quench. my old jig was a little more awkward to use and took up a vice id prefered to have use for other things as well so knocked this up quick this morning for a new batch of blades.
i used some rare earth magnets push fitted into some hardwood off cuts
will re do it when i have time using some micarta off cuts instead.
very quick/easy to use, removable and adjustable!

jig3.JPG jig1.JPG jig2.JPG
 

Dave Budd

Gold Trader
Staff member
Jan 8, 2006
2,755
189
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Dartmoor (Devon)
www.davebudd.com
three point jaws are always useful, though mine are just steel rods welded to angle iron (I'm not worried about marking the blades and I would think wood would just smusch too easily. If you make blades that aren't flat bars (ie scandi's) they are much less effective, so I never use them to straighten knife blades only other tools that are flat (chisels, planes, etc)
 

mark.177

Maker
Apr 21, 2014
722
152
Cornwall UK
it was specifically for a few scandis im making, just a quick job this morning. the blades are ground post heat treat so are flat.
the wood is a little squishy but i'll re do them in some micarta or g10 when i get a spare moment.
 

Condex

Member
may be of interest to the knife makers? for straightening warped blades out of the quench. my old jig was a little more awkward to use and took up a vice id prefered to have use for other things as well so knocked this up quick this morning for a new batch of blades.
i used some rare earth magnets push fitted into some hardwood off cuts
will re do it when i have time using some micarta off cuts instead.
very quick/easy to use, removable and adjustable!

View attachment 51080 View attachment 51081 View attachment 51082
Great idea and so simple. Classic KISS


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Keith_Beef

Native
Sep 9, 2003
1,331
237
51
Yvelines, north-west of Paris, France.
With regard to this, I remember Stuart Mitchell posting something about a pecking hammer
I remember that, too.

I think he described that hammer as having a tungsten carbide tip, and the way it works is that you hit on the inside curve. Imagine a blade that has bent in quenching, you would set it down on an anvil so that the tip and heel are high, and the blade resting on it's centre. You then hit the blade, spreading material on the inside curve, pushing the blade back to straight.

I remember that the straighteners in a blade company where I worked for a while, were very highly respected for the skill it took to straighten big blades for paper and cardboard machiners. They were called "smiths", although they didn't do any forging of the blades; the whole of their work was to straighten out any blades that had warped.