Scrim net scarf...or good old Shemagh??

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Thingreenline

New Member
Nov 1, 2020
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Musselburgh
Hello everyone!

Recently been debating whether to get a scrim net scarf to add to my wearables and see if it would replace my old time Shemagh.

But this raised a ton of questions:
Should it be cotton or polyester? 1m square long enough? Would it work as a barrier against midges?

Has anyone got any experience you would like to share ?

Thank you!!

Dan
 
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C_Claycomb

Mod
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Oct 6, 2003
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Bedfordshire
My experience with scrim was that it was a net, while the shemagh was woven. I can use the latter as a towel, a pillow wrap, a sun hood, as well as a warm scarf in dry conditions. The scrim can do none of those things, other than the scarf. The ability to use it as a camo-face/head cover in a hide were the main reason I even owned the material and I have never used it for camping, hiking or exped and never been in a situation where I have thought it would have been useful. The same cannot be said for various Buff type tubes, the shemagh, synthetic travel towels, wool scarves, nylon scarves...(look on youtube for "MAKING A MORS KOCHANSKI SURVIVAL SCARF"). I have used scrim as a scarf, because that is what was shown in some shooting magazine, and I found it to be rather bulky, heavy, and not particularly warm.

Chris
 
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Thingreenline

New Member
Nov 1, 2020
3
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Musselburgh
My experience with scrim was that it was a net, while the shemagh was woven. I can use the latter as a towel, a pillow wrap, a sun hood, as well as a warm scarf in dry conditions. The scrim can do none of those things, other than the scarf. The ability to use it as a camo-face/head cover in a hide were the main reason I even owned the material and I have never used it for camping, hiking or exped and never been in a situation where I have thought it would have been useful. The same cannot be said for various Buff type tubes, the shemagh, synthetic travel towels, wool scarves, nylon scarves...(look on youtube for "MAKING A MORS KOCHANSKI SURVIVAL SCARF"). I have used scrim as a scarf, because that is what was shown in some shooting magazine, and I found it to be rather bulky, heavy, and not particularly warm.

Chris
That's very useful!

Funnily enough just yesterday I watched a couple of videos on the Kochanski scarf ( I suppose the "scarf theme " rabbit hole got me there). Love the concept but...looks awfully bulky so wasn't completely sold. But as a result I tried to wrap my parachute nylon hammock around my neck to see if that would work... doesn't work! Lol
 
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Broch

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Jan 18, 2009
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Mid Wales
Stick to a good Shamagh - though, pedantically it's only the red and white one that is a true Shemagh; other colours are Keffiyeh.

However, I must declare a bias, as I was brought up with people wearing them - though in towns the older men typically wore a Chechia - that red felted wool hat (no, not the tall thing with a tassel worn by Tommy Cooper). I've also used a Shemagh/Keffiyeh on a number of overland treks through deserts and they are very versatile items of clothing.
 
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Bishop

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Jan 25, 2014
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Inside the wire, Llanelli
Hirbawi Kufiya, 100% cotton, tight weave and bigger than the Chinese offerings. The extra length is important as it allows them worn in a variety of traditional styles without being overly tight on the head. I've got a Mar Saba and Julie loves her brightly coloured "Chocolate" one. They fair well against Welsh midges, Scottish ones and Canadian mosquitoes I cannot say, they are however saving us a fortune in face masks.

 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
2,090
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Berlin
I don't really understand the point.

My fleece jackets close high, I rarely use the polyester fleece tube scarf, because usually it's too warm.

And a small microfibre towel weighs next to nothing and usually dries during the breakfast.

We have a lot of sand in Brandenburg but no sand storms.

Because I avoid survival situations I don't need a cotton cloth as pre water filter, and would I, I simply would take my T-Shirt. It will immediately dry at the fire, which I need to boil the water.

Why should I carry such a tablecloth around?

A triangular boy scout neckerchief as first aid item and more optional uses, OK, why not? But such a bulky shamagh?

I seriously ask you: WHY???
 
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Bishop

Full Member
Jan 25, 2014
1,596
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Inside the wire, Llanelli
The dunes behind many UK beaches are a great place for spot of wild camping and trying ones hand at fishing. Coupled with the proximity of the tourist industry you are never that far from the shops. So vital supplies of food and more importantly beer don't have to be carried far. The downside however... Couple of days out in these conditions and a shamagh is a must have item.
people-walking-a-dog-on-a-windy-beach-with-sand-blowing-whitley-bay-FJGN10.jpg
Historically turbans and head wraps were common in England and Europe throughout the middle ages and up until victorian times a large square of cloth was still a useful item for many a vagabond. Even today, if the wife asks me to get something from the shops on the way home and it does not fit in my shoulder bag then my shamagh becomes a bag.
tramps.jpg
 

Thingreenline

New Member
Nov 1, 2020
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Musselburgh
I don't really understand the point.

My fleece jackets close high, I rarely use the polyester fleece tube scarf, because usually it's too warm.

And a small microfibre towel weighs next to nothing and usually dries during the breakfast.

We have a lot of sand in Brandenburg but no sand storms.

Because I avoid survival situations I don't need a cotton cloth as pre water filter, and would I, I simply would take my T-Shirt. It will immediately dry at the fire, which I need to boil the water.

Why should I carry such a tablecloth around?

A triangular boy scout neckerchief as first aid item and more optional uses, OK, why not? But such a bulky shamagh?

I seriously ask you: WHY???
I suppose we all have our preferences when out and about. That's what is making this forum so interesting.

Personally I found my She...Keffiyeh very useful in both very hot and very cold climates.
Aside from using it a scarf I've used it to wrap my clothes in and make a wonderful pillow at night, countless different head coverings, as a towel, to create shade of stretched between two rocks when I was trekking in Oman, to carry a large boundle of wood, as a strainer when cooking, as an arm sling when broke my arm in Tanzania, and the list goes on and on...that's why I carry the table cloth around with me.
 

Wander

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Jan 6, 2017
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Here There & Everywhere
There's one very serious downside to a shemagh:
You look like a member of an early 80s New Romantic band.
 

demographic

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 15, 2005
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-------------
Shemagh.
Traditional garment, worn all over the world.
Made in Denton Holme, Carlisle (likely made other places also) but the bloke living across the road used to work in the factory setting up the looms.

I used to own one but as a scarf found it kind of bulky and if it was cold enough for me to need it on my motorbike it was a faff to tuck it under my leathers.
Ended up using a neck tube thing which takes up less space and didn't flap about all the time.

As for the water filter/arm sling thing? Well so far its not come up as an issue but rest assured, next time I need to filter my arm sling sweat I'll be getting one out of the wardrobe upstairs.
 
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rustybigend

Member
Aug 19, 2020
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Kettering
i've had the same old shemagh over twelve years and its still as good as it was when i bought it. granted a bit tattered but as a scarf its great and i use it as my oven glove and pillow case among other uses. i have a lifeventures towel but to be honest the shemagh does just as good a job if you decide to scrub up on camp.
 

lostplanet

Full Member
Aug 18, 2005
1,794
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Kent
Hello everyone!

Recently been debating whether to get a scrim net scarf to add to my wearables and see if it would replace my old time Shemagh.

But this raised a ton of questions:
Should it be cotton or polyester? 1m square long enough? Would it work as a barrier against midges?

Has anyone got any experience you would like to share ?

Thank you!!

Dan
In this instance, Shemagh for me, just brilliant.

To answer your questions, the scrim can be bought in polycotton 180cm by 80cm give one a try. https://www.flecktarn.co.uk/odcns1nx.html
dont thnk you would get much midge protection from a standard scrim unless it was treated with permethrin or similar. I would imagine the chemical wouldnt absorb into pure polyester as well as cotton. not sure. You might have more success with a tight weave scrim but then why not get a £4 mosi net built for the job.

large cotton scrim https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/280555767995

These are saying polyester but im sure ive got one and its a mix, doesnt feel plastic.

 
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Insel Affen

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Aug 27, 2014
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Tewkesbury, N Gloucestershire
The scrim can do none of those things, other than the scarf. The ability to use it as a camo-face/head cover in a hide were the main reason I even owned the material and I have never used it for camping, hiking or exped and never been in a situation where I have thought it would have been useful.

I've had both for years. Shemaghs are bulkier but warmer; Face Veils (Scrim scarves) are a little less bulky but not as good as a towel. I suppose it depends on what you want to use it for. But I've used both as towels, cloths, pillows, scarves and head coverings so for me it's what you feel most would be useful for your situation.
 

Duggie Bravo

Nomad
Jul 27, 2013
455
86
Dewsbury
I have an Old Jungle Sweat Rag, tied in big loop, doesn’t keep me warm but is useful for
lots of other things.
Only use I found for a scrim scarf was to wear it like a cravat with combat jacket to hid the fact I couldn’t afford a Norgy shirt and was wearing a KF shirt.


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Tengu

Full Member
Jan 10, 2006
11,112
580
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Wiltshire
Shemagh.

I have several, Though I don't wear them unless very cold. A good versatile piece of kit.

Most days I wear a bandana. (these days over my face)

I have a scrim scarf, not sure why, though it may be because I thought it would be a cool thing as a young person.
 

oldtimer

Full Member
I've carried a bandanna in my pocket and another in my pack for as long as I remember and find them indispensable. I have always disliked the bulk and fussiness of scarves but when I got a buff through recommendations here, I realized why they were so useful and now am never without one.

Now following this thread with interest in case another conversion is in the offing.
 
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MikeLA

Full Member
May 17, 2011
1,563
100
Northumberland
Guess it’s what your used too, I’ve used a scrim scarf since the 80’s. Do like a shemagh but always use the scrim scarf for its size
Just easy to put in my pocket and it does keep my neck warm and also keep the heat escaping from the coat neckline.
Use woolovers on my wrists for the same reason in very cold weather.
 
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Mowmow

Forager
Jul 6, 2016
220
113
Nottinghamshire
I have a small swedish square scarf, its basically just a big snot rag or a bandana.
Makes an awesome sweat rag to wear around the neck on hot days, good bandana if you're cool/cringe enough.
Light and small enough to pack two, ones a clean one and the other is pretty much a rag for boots and managing the fire.
Could be a decent first aid item, mine mostly gets used as PPE or hygiene/wash up item.

I have a couple of shemaghs.
They mostly get worn (without sounding like a gok wan) as a fashion accessory.
Wouldnt be seen dead in one in a UK summer, you just look like an absolute plonker, not amazing in the winter, especially wet. But its better than no scarf and they do look good, good choice if youre not really a scarf person.
Has anyone actually tried filtering through a scarf? It takes FOREVER.
They are bulky.

Scrim net is great, its warm in the winter, cool in the summer (it's the air it traps yet is very breathable)
Makes a decent towel/wash cloth, its a bit more abrasive than a shemagh and dries a a lot quicker.
It really comes into its own though if you use it for camouflage.
It makes a great improvised hide/screen to sit behind, especially spruced up with some foliage.
They make great ghillie alternatives too, either by just breaking up outline of you and your kit as is, or garnished with natural veg or added artificial veg.
You can look out them but people cant see whats behind them (as long as not skylined).
If you do wildlife watching or photography or air gun hunting, they're bloody brilliant.
They dull reflections off lenses (binoculars, scopes) and kit.
Like harry potters invisibility cloak if you use it properly.

Best of all neckwear is easily a headover/buff/tubescarf/whatever.
Get a long one in whatever your material preference is between synthetics or wool/merino wool.
Best thing since sliced bread.
Theyre not exactly fashionable but they're quite indiscrete if you get a plain colour one, fit in a pocket, weigh nothing.


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