Sausage in lard

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rik_uk3

Banned
Jun 10, 2006
13,320
20
65
south wales
Does that mean that you know for a fact that no-one presses the MRM out of free-range animal carcasses? If so, where did you get that information from?

Just interested...
No, all the carcasses are buried with respect;)

Of course they will end up in the food chain, making cheap meat products for the fly tipper types who eat the stuff, filthy social degenerates that they are.
 

John Fenna

Lifetime Member & Maker
Oct 7, 2006
21,851
1,335
63
Pembrokeshire
Hey Rik -
Have you a source for cheap Kimchi (sp) - it goes great with tinned dog :D

This is meant to be humerous, tying in Korean tinned food, tinned sausages of dubious origin, peoples differing attitudes to what various people concider ethical and edible etc etc - OK, please yourself!
 

burning

Tenderfoot
Jul 27, 2006
56
0
52
nw uk
Does that mean that you know for a fact that no-one presses the MRM out of free-range animal carcasses? If so, where did you get that information from?

Just interested...
No I don't know any links to info etc offhand, but how many people who raise animals humanely would buy the equipment for a mass disposal (ie factory process) of carcasses. :rolleyes:
 

robin wood

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Oct 29, 2007
3,054
1
derbyshire
www.robin-wood.co.uk
No, all the carcasses are buried with respect;)

Of course they will end up in the food chain, making cheap meat products for the fly tipper types who eat the stuff, filthy social degenerates that they are.
If you eat these

"To me eating MRM from factory farmed meat is as distasteful as wildcamping in the woods and leaving firesites, beercans and litter strewn everywhere or flytipping in lay byes."

thats the sort of absolute bounder you are, for **** sake
Rik you have chosen to take this as a very personal attack and have become quite personal in your responses both here and in slagging BCUK off on BCL. That is your choice as is what you eat. I nor as far as I can see anyone else here has suggested that you are in the wrong for the choices you make we have simply explained why we make the choices we do. My comment about fly tipping was about how I feel about what I eat and the effect that has on the countryside I live and work in that's why it starts with "To me" I am not suggesting that you are wrong in feeling another way, you can and have put your point of view well too.
 

Nagual

Native
Jun 5, 2007
1,963
0
Argyll
I once worked with a trucker for several weeks, actually a good mate of mine at the time. He delivered meat from abattoirs, cattle or pork mainly, he also delivered a lot of poultry. Much of the meats were delivered to the likes of Smith-Field Market or direct to butchers through out England and Wales, mainly. It was by doing this and talking to the workers at such places that he found out what happens or doesn't happen to the animal once it's dead. Now this was a good few years ago, and I dare say much has changed but there wasn't a single abattoir that didn't fully process any carcass and sell on what they stripped out and that includes to companies that specialise in MRM. Poultry for centuries has had virtually the same thing done to it, birds are killed plucked either cooked or stripped. Bones used for stock then ground up for fish meal to name but one. I think that it may be quite naïve to think that only poorly treated animals are used for MRM, that would be a complete waste of money, otherwise millions of carcasses would not be being used. Please note, I am neither defending MRM or championing it merely passing on what I found out.

From this he learnt that it is completely irrelevant where the animal came from, whether or not it had a great live or a miserable one, once it was dead they are all treated the same. He also found out that the country stamp you get on carcasses, only means what country they were slaughtered in not where they were bred etc. Makes you think.
 

Nagual

Native
Jun 5, 2007
1,963
0
Argyll
Aarr yes tinned square sausages, dog food I mean stewed beef and was it pilchards in tomato sauce (loved crunching the bones) And could all be eaten cold :D

Happy days :rolleyes:

Dear goodness! Are you the one guy we heard about, while telling ghost stories on stag duty... The One Who Likes The Pilchards...:p
 

Nagual

Native
Jun 5, 2007
1,963
0
Argyll
He'll be saying he likes the cheese next.
That would be me.. :eek: Used to love oat biscuits a slice of cheese possessed and a dod of jam on top. Of course as a garnish there were usually several different types of oil and grease too.. :D A great wee nibble while in Soltau or on a Med-Man.
 

preacherman

Full Member
May 21, 2008
307
0
Cork, Ireland
It's not a new situation Thoreau in "Walden, or life in the woods" used to wonder why the Irish navies would endure such incredible hardship in order to eat meat once a week when they could relax so much more if they ate beans. Walden was written in 1854.

Money, meat and sky tv do not bring happiness.
I do not want to start a row here and this is not meant as a dig at Robin, so Robin I apologise in advance if it seems that way, but I must point out any Irish man or woman alive in England in 1854 had fleed from a famine caused originally by potatoe blight. This famine killed at least 1million people (1 eight of the population ) and a further 2 million emigrated. The potato was the staple diet of the majority of the Irish and meat was rarely if ever on the menu for most.

I can imagine Irish people, living and working in England and elsewhere would have been happy to live on vegetables and beans etc. but meat was available to all that could afford it. The reliance on potatoes as a staple diet had contributed to the many deaths so it would be safe to assume that the oppurtunity to eat meat once a week was one that they could not resist. The hardship they had to endure to be able to eat meat once a week was nothing compared to starving to death in Ireland. I would imagine if they were presented with a can of sausages in lard that they would not have baulked at eating them.

I just wanted to put that particular quote in perspective for anyone who would not have been aware of the situation of the time and to put this debate in perspective also. There are people living in poverty in our countries that would be glad to have sausages in a tin or even beans in a tin for that matter.

I understand that people have ethical reasons for not wanting to eat a particular food type and everybody is entitled to their opinion, but is it worth falling out over a can of sausages.
 

robin wood

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Oct 29, 2007
3,054
1
derbyshire
www.robin-wood.co.uk
any Irish man or woman alive in England in 1854 had fleed from a famine caused originally by potatoe blight. .
A very good point, I was well aware of the blight and famine and mass emigration but had not connected with the date of Thoreaux. He is writing in the US not England but the situation is the same. He goes to some length interviewing families and itemising what they eat and how much it costs, I'll try to dig it out.
 

preacherman

Full Member
May 21, 2008
307
0
Cork, Ireland
Thanks Robin, I would be interested in reading that. That period would be very familiar to us as it was a huge part of our history and will never be forgotten I would say.

Even though the potatoe blight caused the deaths of many people here we still love our spuds :D.
 

myotis

Full Member
Apr 28, 2008
837
1
Somerset, UK.
I do not want to start a row here and this is not meant as a dig at Robin, so Robin I apologise in advance if it seems that way, but I must point out any Irish man or woman alive in England in 1854 had fleed from a famine caused originally by potatoe blight. This famine killed at least 1million people (1 eight of the population ) and a further 2 million emigrated. The potato was the staple diet of the majority of the Irish and meat was rarely if ever on the menu for most.
Not wishing to take this thread even more off topic, but having read a few books on the Irish Potato famine, when on holiday in Ireland a few years ago, it is one of those appalling episodes in British History that we should probably all be aware of.

The British (and I think the large land owning Irish) treated the peasant community appallingly during the famine period. There was, at the same time, a Scottish potato famine, which no one hears about. One of the reasons is that it had far less impact because the Scottish landowners, were letting their tennants off their rents and using their own money to help feed their tennants.

In contrast, in Ireland, tennants were being evicted and Ireland continued to export food, even when the majority of its population was starving.

I have to admit, to not remembering the details, but I do remember being horrified at what was going on in Ireland at the time, and what came across as a total disregard for the "ordinary" Irish populace.

I've just had a look for the books, and can't find them, so my facts might be a bit wobbly, but I think the essence is correct.

Graham