Royal Mail Restricted Items-Tomahawk

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Torak

Forager
Oct 4, 2006
193
0
uk
Folks

I tried to post a tomahawk today via Royal Mail special delivery only to be told they wouldn't send it as its a prohibited item:confused:. Like most people on here I have received at least a few knives/axes/hawks through the post but never tried to post any.

I am at a bit of a lose about this given the amount of items sent through post every day by both personal and business. Before I ring Royal Mail customer service has anyone any advice?

Thanks

Torak
 

widu13

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Feb 9, 2008
2,335
16
Ubique Quo Fas Et Gloria Ducunt
It's the persons perception. A tomahawk is an axe which can be carried by Royal Mail. A spike Tomahawk is a weapon and they will not carry that.

A normal tomahawk is a tool and can be sent. Just make sure you see a different person next time and tell them it's a tool.
 

Torak

Forager
Oct 4, 2006
193
0
uk
It's the persons perception. A tomahawk is an axe which can be carried by Royal Mail. A spike Tomahawk is a weapon and they will not carry that.

A normal tomahawk is a tool and can be sent. Just make sure you see a different person next time and tell them it's a tool.
Thought it may have been something like,more the principle I don't get.

Will just refer to it as an axe
Thanks
 

Johnnyboy1971

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Dec 24, 2010
4,153
21
48
Yorkshire
Same as topknot I send all my sharps as woodworking tools or just tools.

Sent using new fangled smoke signals
 

Macaroon

A bemused & bewildered
Jan 5, 2013
7,115
266
69
SE Wales
The counter staff have no right whatsoever to ask you what your parcel contains. They are authorised to show you the list of prohibited items and ask if what you're sending is on that list; if you tell them it's not then they should take your parcel in the normal way. However, you have to be very wary of getting the wrong side of them as if they want to, they can make things "disappear" in an unofficial sort of way. I had this nonsense with counter staff three times a year or so back and got them to take the parcels, but none were ever returned or delivered, but one recipient received an empty jiffy!

I still use the same post office and when asked what's in my packages I just answer "nothing from the prohibited list", and have had no problems since. I hope this helps :)
 

Torak

Forager
Oct 4, 2006
193
0
uk
All advice appreciated guys. I'll put wasted journey down to experience.

Thanks again

Torak
 
Some good advice there Torak. I've sent several axes and tomahawks, drawknifes and Billhooks in the post and I've boxed them up so they clearly aren't recognisable as axe shaped. One fussy teller got rather inquisitive as I was rather evasive, finalyl I just told her it was a starting handle for a vintage tractor. Her whole attitude changed and she was all smiles.

Never had any parcels go missing though, but that is worrying if there is some unofficial policy that they tag a suspect package to end up in a box out the back for dibs later on.
 

Countryman

Full Member
Jun 26, 2013
1,609
49
North Dorset
The counter staff have no right whatsoever to ask you what your parcel contains.

I still use the same post office and when asked what's in my packages I just answer "nothing from the prohibited list", and have had no problems since. I hope this helps :)
Excellent advice!


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decorum

Full Member
May 2, 2007
5,064
10
Warwickshire
>>>

Will just refer to it as an axe
<<<
Or camping tool / camping equipment / wood working tool. Depending on the age and / or ease of availability then collectable or collectors piece or vintage tool might be applicable.


Cast your eye over the Royal Mail lists on what can and can't be sent ;)

Sharp objectsSharp objects like knives, kitchen utensils and gardening tools may only be posted if they are packaged appropriately so that they are no risk to employees, other postal items or recipients.
Wrap heavy cardboard around sharp edges and points, strong enough to ensure that the contents do not pierce the outer packaging. Wrap each item with cushioning material. Place in a suitable outer container such as a padded envelope. The sender’s name and return address must be clearly visible on the outer packaging.
Above quote taken from Royal Mail's 'Sharp objects' section of their own 'Tell me about restricted goods' page.


Also see the weapons section in their 'Tell me about prohibited goods' page.


Some staff might choose to interpret 'restricted' in the same vein as 'prohibited'. It might be worth printing a copy of each before going back ;) :D
 

Johnnyboy1971

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Dec 24, 2010
4,153
21
48
Yorkshire
It doesn't help with them having a picture of a knife with the word weapon under it. Most of the time I use a courier now but sometime I have to use the PO.

Sent using new fangled smoke signals
 

Samon

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 24, 2011
3,970
38
Britannia!
It's the persons perception. A tomahawk is an axe which can be carried by Royal Mail. A spike Tomahawk is a weapon and they will not carry that.

A normal tomahawk is a tool and can be sent. Just make sure you see a different person next time and tell them it's a tool.

Gotta stop you there dude! If you've ever been to, entered or watched axe throwing competitions you'll notice none of the lads with spike hawks are killing each other. Its merely an appendage of the tool to assist its designated purpose. I.e its a tool used in competitions, not frigging weapon!

It might make an unsuspecting office worker nervous but it has as much purpose as a tennis racket in the right hands.

Royal fail hire nosey old gits, and I can't really blame them I'd go nuts not knowing what's in each parcel, but that's the treasure hunter in me, not the nosey jobsworth.

With any knife, axe, billhook, aired gun, crossbow or tool i simply state its sporting goods. If they poke their nose in a little deeper depending on the type I.e edge/sharply pointed article I say 'hand tool, that is wrapped with special care'. Special care IMO is enough baggage to keep the working end safe from hurting anyone and enough to wrapping to not give any impressions as to what it might be.


My advice is to always go OTT with packaging/wrapping any tool, just to be sure! And never divulge too much info to a nosey sod! ;)

I hope you get it sent soon mate!
 
Last edited:

widu13

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Feb 9, 2008
2,335
16
Ubique Quo Fas Et Gloria Ducunt
Gotta stop you there dude! If you've ever been to, entered or watched axe throwing competitions you'll notice none of the lads with spike hawks are killing each other. Its merely an appendage of the tool to assist its designated purpose. I.e its a tool used in competitions, not frigging weapon!

It might make an unsuspecting office worker nervous but it has as much purpose as a tennis racket in the right hands.

Royal fail hire nosey old gits, and I can't really blame them I'd go nuts not knowing what's in each parcel, but that's the treasure hunter in me, not the nosey jobsworth.

With any knife, axe, billhook, aired gun, crossbow or tool i simply state its sporting goods. If they poke their nose in a little deeper depending on the type I.e edge/sharply pointed article I say 'hand tool, that is wrapped with special care'. Special care IMO is enough baggage to keep the working end safe from hurting anyone and enough to wrapping to not give any impressions as to what it might be.


My advice is to always go OTT with packaging/wrapping any tool, just to be sure! And never divulge too much info to a nosey sod! ;)

I hope you get it sent soon mate!
wrong. the spike hawk was adapted as a weapon by first nation Americans and recently during the Vietnam war and even in the very recent middle East conflicts. you need to check your history facts bud. no matter what you use it for it's purpose was as a weapon. a bayonet can be used as a letter opener but it is still a weapon.

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Torak

Forager
Oct 4, 2006
193
0
uk
If only I had had this today! Thanks

Or camping tool / camping equipment / wood working tool. Depending on the age and / or ease of availability then collectable or collectors piece or vintage tool might be applicable.


Cast your eye over the Royal Mail lists on what can and can't be sent ;)



Above quote taken from Royal Mail's 'Sharp objects' section of their own 'Tell me about restricted goods' page.


Also see the weapons section in their 'Tell me about prohibited goods' page.


Some staff might choose to interpret 'restricted' in the same vein as 'prohibited'. It might be worth printing a copy of each before going back ;) :D