Powdered Egg and Tinned Cheeses

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xylaria

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
I was trying for a William Wallace vs Wallace-of-Wallace-and-Grommit joke. I guess it needs more work...
your jokes were really funny, I'm the one who sent it sideways.

Do you know people ate butter and cheese before they had fridges. :banghead: They would put them in clay pots and bury them in thier yard. I have tried it beer cans and it works quite well.
 

tommy the cat

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Feb 6, 2007
2,138
0
51
SHROPSHIRE UK
A fella who had a shop near to mine brought in some tinned cheese from the 1940's it had a date stamp on it......we ate it very nice it was to!:) Dave
 

Emma

Forager
Nov 29, 2004
178
3
Hampshire/Sussex
Well my powdered egg came from Tesco (look very hard in all areas close to the home baking section, in a big store, not one of those expensive little petrol station jobbies), and I haven't yet found a supermarket that doesn't stock powdered milk, although they do put it in different places. Generally it's near either hot chocolate or horlicks or something, or long life cartons of milk or soy milk.

I've never heard of tinned butter before, so I did attempt that search for British Red...
I found a recipe from a website called 'fluwiki'.
Canned Butter

I haven’t tried this yet but got this recipe from a friend who says that it works. But you do need to buy REAL butter and make sure it is the good stuff.

Ingredients and Instructions 1. Use only highest quality butter (Land O Lakes or equivalent). 2. Heat jelly jars in 250 F.-degree oven for 20 minutes, without rings or seals. 3. While jars heat, melt butter slowly until it comes to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 5 minutes. 4. Pour melted butter carefully into heated jars, being careful not to get any butter on rim of jar. 5. Add lid and ring and close securely. They will seal as they cool. Shake jars a few times during cooling to prevent separation, although this step is optional. 6. Put into refrigerator or other cool place until butter hardens. After hardening, butter will store for 3 years.
And a website that appears to advertise a Guernsey shop that sells tinned butter: Safari Traders, whose e-mail address appears to be safaritraders at safariconnect.co.uk. However, I cannot find anything else about these people anywhere on the net, nor could I find who safariconnect.co.uk is owned by, so personally I would avoid them...

Apart from that, I found a vague reference to a Safeway in Gibraltar, which isn't exactly mainland Britain either! I don't know how old that page was either, given that Morrisons took Safeway over a year or so back.

Other than that, most references seem to be in relation to the war or Australia...



I'm intrigued though - how similar is tinned butter to the usual refridgerated sort? I can't get past thinking about the differences between normal milk and the tinned varieties...
 

British Red

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Dec 30, 2005
25,549
438
Mercia
Nope - not like that at all! Just like normal butter. As gregorach says, theres not much to go off, the tin just provides protection, excludes air etc. It really is very good

I have seen the tips on home canning before - it may come to that if it has to! Thanks for the info Emma

Red
 

British Red

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Dec 30, 2005
25,549
438
Mercia
Emma, I'm holding you responsible for this.....

Kitchen smells lovely though - all warm and buttery!

Red
 

British Red

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Dec 30, 2005
25,549
438
Mercia
Yeah, I know what you're saying Red - it's just that I regard butter and cheese as long-life staples anyway. They both keep for yonks. You could have a rolling six-month supply of butter in the pantry as long as it's properly wrapped. The reason the Aussies keep it in tins is to stop it running away in the heat.

I just find the concept of tinned cheese really wierd. Cheese can keep for years.
I reckon thats well enough wrapped. I might experiment with some smaller ones for bush use.



Off to find out how to can cheese....

Red
 

big_swede

Native
Sep 22, 2006
1,452
8
38
W Yorkshire
if you can't find powdered eggs in your local supermarket you can make it yourself. Make a foil form and fill it with some lightly beaten eggs, and leave in a oven set on low heat (40-50 degrees centigrade) over night with a wooden fork/spatula/whatever set to keep the door a bit open. Crumble the weird cake-thing left in the form in the morning. Keep airtight.
 

rik_uk3

Banned
Jun 10, 2006
13,320
20
66
south wales
Look in your local Turkish food shop, they often sell tinned Feta cheese, the main brand is made by Pinar. Its two blocks of Feta, in a salt brine, very good cheese it is too, last ages. Use what you want and pop it back in the can (plastic lid is provided)
 

11binf

New Member
Aug 16, 2005
203
0
57
Phx. Arizona U.S.A
folks try your local asian /ethnic food market....here in Arizona i have one around the corner and have found items like tinned cheese (2 brands from Aussie) tinned dutch butter and also compo type hard biscuits from taiwan...all kinds of neat hard to find food items.:) ..vince g. 11b inf..
 

daved

Forager
Aug 1, 2005
126
0
London
Our local Tesco stocks tinned cheese "Kraft". I found it in a small section of middle-eastern foods rather than with the other tinned foods.