Peas

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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Diverging languages can cause a lot of confusion!

I find most beans ( UK English beans) to taste in a quite similar way, same with dried peas ( UK English peas) .
Similar taste profile kind of. ( like Beer has one taste profile, and Red wine another...)

Same with Lentils, except those French ones.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
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Florida
I'll remember to use Latin in future, although Pisum sativum subsp. arvense might confuse a few people.
That’s normally a good idea, but it seems it would defeat your question to name a specific species. Wasn’t the point to ask opinions of what might be a preferred species?
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Is there not some old variety, that is delicious eaten young, delicious eaten mature but fresh, and that dries well ( and taste good )?

Thinking of it, apart from Haricots Verts, I do not think I have ever eaten a cooked, fresh bean, ever.

I think he asked about a Varity, not Species. All varieties go under one species?
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
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937
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Florida
Is there not some old variety, that is delicious eaten young, delicious eaten mature but fresh, and that dries well ( and taste good )?

Thinking of it, apart from Haricots Verts, I do not think I have ever eaten a cooked, fresh bean, ever.

I think he asked about a Varity, not Species. All varieties go under one species?
If you’re referring to American peas as beans, then they are all eaten fresh although it’s rare with blackeyed peas.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
The oval ones I call Beans. Navy, Butter ,Kidney, that kind of shape. Only had them after they were dried. Then rehydrated/coked.

Never in the stage before the drying. I do not think I have ever seen the being sold fresh? Not in Europe or here.
We are flying to Miami for the coming long weekend and will see what they have there.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,376
1,448
McBride, BC
Very elongate pods, we have fresh, raw yellow beans and green beans. Others might be shelled but green/raw/fresh.
Raw green beans are quite toxic until cooked so be mindful of garden snacking. The seeds are oval in shape.
The round seeded ones we call peas and lentils.
Part of the mix-up are the garbanzo beans = chick peas. Don't know what those are. For hummus.
Half a dozen or more different species and hundreds of varieties in each.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,623
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S. Lanarkshire
I asked for variety, so suggestions of varieties of Pisum sativum subsp. arvense
I have grown both Kelvedon Wonder and Hurst's Greenshaft.
The Kelvedon ones are short peas, but every pod is full, and the peas are sweet. I don't dry them all, but I do dry quite a lot.
The Hurst's Greenshaft were taller, a very symmetrical kind of pod, very tasty, and again they dried fine.
Neither are 'big' peas though, and unlike Maro (another good variety, makes brilliant mushy peas) they don't seem to go 'hard' in the pod.

I have no idea what the variety is, but the dried peas in bags or boxes from the grocery stores will often sprout with no bother. I grew them for my kids a few times.
Might be worth a try ?

M
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,572
937
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Florida
The oval ones I call Beans. Navy, Butter ,Kidney, that kind of shape. Only had them after they were dried. Then rehydrated/coked.......
Butterbeans are flattish like these:


-Speckled butterbeans: https://c8.alamy.com/comp/CE814N/speckled-butter-beans-CE814N.jpg


- Small green Butterbeans: https://www.lanascooking.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/southern-butter-beans-feature.jpg


Succotash (traditional vegetable dish made with butterbeans and corn): https://assets.marthastewart.com/styles/wmax-300/d7/tvs6401/tvs6401_xl.jpg?itok=Qq_sOCIE


ALL are made with fresh or frozen butterbeans. Only the large, tough, old butterbeans are dried.


Actual “fresh” will be difficult to find in a chain supermarket. Try the frozen section (they’re parboiled and frozen with no drying) or go to a small market or farm market for fresh ones. At least for fresh peas that y’all are calling beans, or for butterbeans. I’ve never seen fresh or frozen actual beans either ( Navy Beans, Red Beans/also called Kidney Beans, Pinto Beans, Black Beans, etc.)
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,376
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McBride, BC
Like I said, it is a fact that fresh raw green beans are toxic. To nibble is OK but don't eat a lot.
Offhand, I can't recall the biochenmical name of the toxin and I won't lift a finger to look for it.

Peas are all in the genus Pisum. Most of the common edible varieties are Pisum sativum.
All the bean species are in the genus Phaseolus. Phaseolus vulgaris would be the stem source.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,572
937
63
Florida
Like I said, it is a fact that fresh raw green beans are toxic. To nibble is OK but don't eat a lot.
Offhand, I can't recall the biochenmical name of the toxin and I won't lift a finger to look for it.

Peas are all in the genus Pisum. Most of the common edible varieties are Pisum sativum.
All the bean species are in the genus Phaseolus. Phaseolus vulgaris would be the stem source.
Why would anybody want to eat them raw anyway? The taste raw is horrible.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,376
1,448
McBride, BC
Santaman: maybe to you, raw green beans don't taste good.
I would eat them like fresh-picked peas, if I could.

I've been gifted all sorts of all-in-one packets of dried peas and beans and herbs, soups, I guess.
Must dig them all out this winter.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
It is all in the dressing.
(Raw green Haricots Verts) beans are nice with a Costello (Danish) Blue cheese dressing, home made. If you like Blue molded cheese!)
Or receipe.

But then most food improves with herbs and spices!
 
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slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,072
144
Devon
I have no idea what the variety is, but the dried peas in bags or boxes from the grocery stores will often sprout with no bother. I grew them for my kids a few times.
Might be worth a try ?

M
Thanks Toddy, I did reply earlier that I've found some varieties but it's been lost in the posts from people discussing beans. I'll post it again after this.

I have grown plenty of grocery seeds as experiments (chickpeas for example) but as we know we like the soup peas we want to find a variety or two that's reliable. Some of the dried peas sold as food will be grown in drier and warmer climes, harvested by combine and less suitable for garden growing.
 

slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,072
144
Devon
Well, I've found some seeds. I should have looked at Real Seeds first as we've bought quite a lot of seeds from them in the past and they have always been excellent.

At the bottom of their pea page they have 4 varieties of soup peas. I'll try a packet of each if they are available. https://www.realseeds.co.uk/peas.html

We grow some of their mange-tout seeds and can go a good couple of months having a daily harvest. They're a favourite of our dog who picks her own pods.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,623
1,720
S. Lanarkshire
Thanks Toddy, I did reply earlier that I've found some varieties but it's been lost in the posts from people discussing beans. I'll post it again after this.

I have grown plenty of grocery seeds as experiments (chickpeas for example) but as we know we like the soup peas we want to find a variety or two that's reliable. Some of the dried peas sold as food will be grown in drier and warmer climes, harvested by combine and less suitable for garden growing.
They often are, but that said, I have found packs that said, "Grown in the UK".
Hodmedod's sell UK produce, and it's very good :D

https://hodmedods.co.uk/collections/peas

I too like Realseeds though, I've bought a lot of stuff from them over the years. Always interesting :)