Peas

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Toddy

Mod
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Jan 21, 2005
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S. Lanarkshire
There's another trick but it is with lentils .. .haven't done it with dried peas yet .. .might not work as I think the lentil and pea skins help a lot in the constituency. Anyway, fry a chopped onion til soft in oil with a fair dose of fresh ground coriander and cumin, plus salt. Add this to a load of cooked green lentils and an equal amount of cooked peas and add butter to taste. Mash it up. Eat it hot or cold with bread or as a side. Rustic as ...
Make a mirepoix of onion, carrot and celery, all chopped small, with a little olive oil, Add brown (or green, brown's better though) lentils and enough water to just cover. I use a heavy sauté pan, pop in a couple of bay leaves and then put the lid on and let it all cook just on the simmer until the lentils are soft but not mush. Depends on many factors just how long, but check after 20 minutes and I find mine need just over 25.
Adjust seasoning if necessary, salt and black pepper, some folks add some garlic with the bay leaves, and add a good handful of chopped parsley before serving.

Classic lentils, pretty much standard European dish.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Soak dry peas ( yellow) overnight.
Drain water, rinse.
Boil together with a bit of salt ( or stock cube), and a pinch of peppe and Marjoram until soft.
From time to time, skim off the pea skin.
Serve with Dijon mustard on the side, stir into own soup required amount.
Serve with boiled smoked pork, thinly sliced.


Wash lentils
Boil gently in slightly salted water until just done.
Pour most of water in a cup, save.
Add sugar, gently stir. Should have a gentle sweetness.
Add Apple cider vinegar, stir.
Should be just a little bit acidic.

Serve with fried eggs, pickled cucumber, (a frankfurter if you must)
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
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McBride, BC
My culinary project for this winter will be no more than serious baked beans with pork and molasses.
I have what might be the family recipe from the Klondike Gold Rush on the Yukon.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
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You're kind of confusing us.
Sweet peas are flowers here. Beautiful, scented flowers, but their peas are poisonous.



M
Edible peas here are divided into a few different categories (each category containing several different species)

A) English Peas. This category contains all the European species of peas you’re used to.

B) Black Eyed Peas. This category contains a few species, all larger peas. Usually, but not always, these will be dried rather than eaten fresh.

C) Field Peas. This category is similar to Black Eyed Peas but they’re smaller, greener, and most often served fresh or preserved by freezing. As RV said, they’re starchy.

D) Sweet Peas. There are literally hundreds of varieties of this category. They’re also similar to Black Eyed Peas but smaller and much, much sweeter. Also usually served fresh or preserved by freezing.

This image is one of the “white acre” varieties of sweet peas: http://www.specialtyproduce.com/sppics/14009.png
 
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Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
We divide them into peas and beans.
I think most Europeans would call the B.E. Pea a bean, and cook it as a bean.
Because it belongs to the bean family!

For some weird reason, on the West side of the Atlantic, several dishes are using the ‘pea’ name, even if beans are used.
Rice and Peas in Jamaica - prepared with small Red Kidney beans.

Goes very well with a good Jerk, both chicken and pork! In fact, goes about with anything savoury!
Legumes they all are, anyway.

Edit: my 2 favorite soups here: Porktail and peas, then salt beef and beans.
Same legume in both!

Even an XR fanatic would enjoy the Salt beef soup, but you need to be a very adventurous expat to enjoy the Porktail one!
 
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Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,774
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S. Lanarkshire
Edible peas here are divided into a few different categories (each category containing several different species)

A) English Peas. This category contains all the European species of peas you’re used to.

B) Black Eyed Peas. This category contains a few species, all larger peas. Usually, but not always, these will be dried rather than eaten fresh.

C) Field Peas. This category is similar to Black Eyed Peas but they’re smaller, greener, and most often served fresh or preserved by freezing. As RV said, they’re starchy.

D) Sweet Peas. There are literally hundreds of varieties of this category. They’re also similar to Black Eyed Peas but smaller and much, much sweeter. Also usually served fresh or preserved by freezing.

This image is one of the “white acre” varieties of sweet peas: http://www.specialtyproduce.com/sppics/14009.png
Peas, either fresh or dried, everything from sugar snap to mangetout, from Kelvedon Wonder to Rondo. Enormous range of varieties.
All Pisum sativum though.
e.g.
https://www.suttons.co.uk/Gardening...-Seeds/Pea-Seeds/list.htm?pl=2147483647#close
https://search.thompson-morgan.com/search?w=pea&asug=

Beans, and they pre-date contact with the 'new world', are Vigna. The new world ones are Phaseola. The Vigna ones include the broad beans and such like from India and Afghanistan that eventually spread via the middle east over to mainland Europe (mind N. Europe was wiped clean by the last Ice Age, re-introduction of species had a convoluted route) and adzuki and mung.

Your field peas are just peas, usually harvested and frozen within a couple of hours of harvesting.
how do they make frozen peas

Lentils are Lens culinaris or esculenta and are a really old crop.

Sweet Peas are flowers, and their peas are poisonous. Sweet peas are Lathyrus odoratus.
The seeds of sweet peas are mildly poisonous containing lathyrogens. The toxin is called aminoproprionitrite. The poisoning is called Lathyrus, and it causes paralysis, laboured breathing, heart problems, and seizures.
" the toxic constituent of peas from Lathyrus plants, e.g., Lathyrus odoratus Lathyrism, a disease known for centuries, encompasses 2 distinct entities: a disorder of the nervous system (neurolathyrism) leading to limb paralysis, and a disorder of connective tissue, causing either bone deformity (osteolathyrism) or aortic aneurisms (angiolathyrim). BAPN causes osteolathyrism and angiolathyrism when ingested in large quantities."

There are edible, for a very narrow given of edible, Lathyrus peas; Lathyrus sativus, but their toxic effects have been known for millenia and they are really a famine food.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lathyrus_sativus
Probably that link says it all really.

M
 

Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Peas are round, beans are oblong, lentils are flattish.

Dried peas come in yellow or green
Dried beans come in all sorts,
Lentils come in orange/yellow, greenish, brown. But the French Puy lentils are almost round and grey black.
Those I do not like so much,
 

Toddy

Mod
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Jan 21, 2005
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S. Lanarkshire
Me neither. They're okay, they're the green lentils I mentioned earlier, but they're not as good as the brown; well, I think so.
 

Woody girl

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 31, 2018
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I couldn't grow enough peas this year... I keep eating them straight from the pod best way to eat them.!
I've frozen some and dried some to use as seed next year.
I've successfully dried a bag of frozen supermarket peas as well .

Blooming yanks,! trying to bump us off by recommending eating sweet peas to us Brits. ! ;) :) :)
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,568
1,563
McBride, BC
We all owe Gregor Mendel (priest in Austria) a great vote of thanks for the science that gives us so many varieties of peas.
His attention to detail and record keeping sorted out the basic principles of genetics.
Real "sugar peas" here are eaten, pods and all, when they are still flat.
 
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Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
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S. Lanarkshire
Those ones we eat in stir fries usually, or quickly cooked in a little butter and either lemon or black pepper.
I'm a pain, I still de-string them though.

M
 
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santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
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slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,126
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Devon
Well, I've found some seeds. I should have looked at Real Seeds first as we've bought quite a lot of seeds from them in the past and they have always been excellent.

At the bottom of their pea page they have 4 varieties of soup peas. I'll try a packet of each if they are available. https://www.realseeds.co.uk/peas.html

We grow some of their mange-tout seeds and can go a good couple of months having a daily harvest. They're a favourite of our dog who picks her own pods.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,700
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Florida
.....Your field peas are just peas, usually harvested and frozen within a couple of hours of harvesting.
how do they make frozen peas.......M
That link is not our field peas. Those are English Peas. This is our field Peas (with snaps): http://www.deepsouthdish.com/2014/07/southern-field-peas-and-snaps.html
And this is without the snaps: https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/images/2012/05/20120514-206365-fresh-field-peas.jpg

Although your article is correct in that we do indeed Blanche them before freezing.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,700
981
63
Florida
........Sweet Peas are flowers, and their peas are poisonous. Sweet peas are Lathyrus odoratus.
The seeds of sweet peas are mildly poisonous containing lathyrogens. The toxin is called aminoproprionitrite. The poisoning is called Lathyrus, and it causes paralysis, laboured breathing, heart problems, and seizures.
" the toxic constituent of peas from Lathyrus plants, e.g., Lathyrus odoratus Lathyrism, a disease known for centuries, encompasses 2 distinct entities: a disorder of the nervous system (neurolathyrism) leading to limb paralysis, and a disorder of connective tissue, causing either bone deformity (osteolathyrism) or aortic aneurisms (angiolathyrim). BAPN causes osteolathyrism and angiolathyrism when ingested in large quantities."

There are edible, for a very narrow given of edible, Lathyrus peas; Lathyrus sativus, but their toxic effects have been known for millenia and they are really a famine food.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lathyrus_sativus
Probably that link says it all really.

M
Our sweet peas are the ones I already linked images too earlier.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,700
981
63
Florida
I couldn't grow enough peas this year... I keep eating them straight from the pod best way to eat them.!
I've frozen some and dried some to use as seed next year.
I've successfully dried a bag of frozen supermarket peas as well .

Blooming yanks,! trying to bump us off by recommending eating sweet peas to us Brits. ! ;) :) :)
I’m recommend dig you eat REAL sweet peas, not the things you grow there.