new DIY wood gassification stove

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cmarkod

Full Member
Feb 18, 2016
19
0
Manchester
I've got loads of tins lying around that need to make their way to a shed project I run. I was a bit bored this afternoon and so I created a wood gasification stove. I've been a bit dubious about whether they are better than simple hobo stoves but thought I'd investigate to see. I made a simple hobo stove for comparison and the gasification one burned hotter and faster so there may well be something in it! Took about 15 mins to do using drill, can opener and tin snips. The two cans I used were a coffee tin for the outer skin and a golden syrup tin for the inner. I was going to join the two with high temp silicone but my tube had dried out and the fit was great anyway so no need on this test run. I used 5mm drill bit for air holes on the base and lower rim of the inner can and 3mm for the upper set of air holes. I used 5mm again for the outer can with a raised base created from the outer can which is taller. I snipped and folded the outer can to form 4 tabs to hold the inner can in place. Here a a couple of photos of the work in progress and the first firing.....Worth making if you have some tins lying around.
stove.jpgstove2.jpg
 

woodstock

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 7, 2007
3,568
65
63
off grid somewhere else
I made a couple ages ago I think it posted on here somewhere 2 cans a church key the fan grill from a computer and some fire putty worked a treat.
 

Somellier

Member
Jan 17, 2017
23
0
Peak District
I was dubious about their efficiency, so made one, like you, out of 2 tin cans. Fired it up and wow, damned fine stove, so bought a Wild Woodgas Stove, which separates and fits in a billy.
 

Macaroon

A bemused & bewildered
Jan 5, 2013
7,115
266
70
SE Wales
Instead of making one that seperates, make one that uses three sizes of container that nest into each other; use containers that have lids, turn them upside down so the outside one has the removable lid on the bottom and use the smallest one as the inside firebox with the largest as the outside shell. The middle sized one then becomes the billy, and fits upside down between the other two for storage when not in use, leaving the inside chamber free for storage of spoon, pot grip & brew kit etc.

This gives you your stove and complete brew kit all contained within the size of the largest canister, and without having to keep breaking the seal between the two chambers. I made one of these from charity shop canisters
over five years ago and use it at least once most days, and a lot more than that when the days are longer; it shows no signs of burning out or indeed any wear at all. If it were a little lighter I would post some pics., I suppose I could get some together if anybody hasn't got that clear?
 

cmarkod

Full Member
Feb 18, 2016
19
0
Manchester
Nice work. I've a few tea caddies floating about with lids and are stainless too so I may well have another go and use your idea if I can get them to nest. Cheers.:You_Rock_
 

Macaroon

A bemused & bewildered
Jan 5, 2013
7,115
266
70
SE Wales
Nice work. I've a few tea caddies floating about with lids and are stainless too so I may well have another go and use your idea if I can get them to nest. Cheers.:You_Rock_
Be sure to post up your results when you do get it going :)
 

mousey

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jun 15, 2010
2,210
252
38
NE Scotland
I've had a go at make a few wood stoves, some gassifying some not, and a couple meths stoves. It is good fun, but mine didn't look anything like as finished as Macaroons one.

http://zenstoves.net/

is a good resource website.
 

Macaroon

A bemused & bewildered
Jan 5, 2013
7,115
266
70
SE Wales
The 'finished' look of home-made stoves, and their longevity, is down to the standard of the containers you source to work with and only a very little to any kind of skill or craftsmanship. I get most of my stainless from charity shops and I've made some in the past from biscuit barrels and the like from cheapo places such as Wilko's.
 

RAPPLEBY2000

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Dec 2, 2003
3,195
10
47
England
If people want the parts to separate, could you not use bolts, tightened with the protruding end on the inside to hold the inner can?
(the same way cheap Christmas tree holders work).

Another option, I assume the air space around the inner can is needed, if so, could you wrap folded Chicken wire around the inner can to hold the cans apart?

I've only made the simple bean tin/church key stove, so I'm interested with the double wall idea and if it's any better.
 
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