Lymes Disease - 3x more cases than expected.

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Jan 13, 2018
358
250
63
Rural Lincolnshire
https://www.theguardian.com/science...ases-may-be-three-times-higher-than-estimated


Cases of Lyme disease in the UK may be three times higher than previous estimates, according to new research.
After analysing the anonymous medical records of 8.4 million people from across the UK, scientists forecast that the total number of Lyme disease diagnoses in the UK could top 8,000 in 2019, compared with previous estimates of between 2,000 and 3,000 annual diagnoses.


Lyme disease is a bacterial infection, which is passed on through being bitten by an infected tick. The small spider-like creatures feed off the blood of animals and are typically found in dense, moist vegetation.


Lyme disease has many symptoms, making it difficult to diagnose. Early symptoms can be similar to those of flu, and about a quarter of cases will develop a circular red rash around the bite. Full clinical diagnosis requires a blood test, but the study found that more than half of patients in 2012, the most recent year with complete data, were treated with only “suspected” or “possible” Lyme disease.


If caught early, most cases can be successfully treated with antibiotics within four weeks, but the infection can lead to permanent damage to the joints and nervous system.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
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McBride, BC
The correct name is "Lyme Disease." So named after the town of Lyme, in the state of Connecticut, U.S.A.
Nasty and debilitating, whatever it's called.
 
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SimonL

Full Member
Oct 13, 2010
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Farnborough, Hants
I would be interested to know what people use to remove the ticks ?
Some time ago, I started to carry the "O'Tom Tick Twister" which has two different sized tools, but fortunately, I haven't had occasion to use it yet (of course, that does mean I don't know how effective they are) as I tend to cover up now more than I used to - especially as I walk in a lot of areas where there's long grass.
Not sure if it's coincidental or not, but as I am regarded by most of the mosquito population of anywhere within a 5 mile radius of where I am as a veritable delicacy, I use various repellents (Nordic Summer, Stupidly Simple, Avon's Skin So Soft, Citronella oil) which have dramatically reduced my appeal to said hungry mozzies (I would add that the Pine smelling products have also reduced my appeal to my good lady :() I don't know if repellents work on ticks ?
I think it's vitally important that people are better educated about Lyme Disease - interesting advice is out there including removing the tick(s) and keeping it/them in a plastic bag in the freezer with a date/time/location so that if symptoms do occur, the doctors can start off from "it could be Lyme Disease 'cos the patient was bitten by a tick" (would also help track where it's a problem.
Enough of my ramblings - hope you all stay bite free !
Simon
 
Jan 13, 2018
358
250
63
Rural Lincolnshire
I would be interested to know what people use to remove the ticks ?
Some time ago, I started to carry the "O'Tom Tick Twister" which has two different sized tools, but fortunately, I haven't had occasion to use it yet

I am (fortunately) in the same situation I have not yet needed to use my 'tool'.
This is what I have in my 1st Aid Kit.

https://ibb.co/WtWDvNM

https://ibb.co/VvDzCZB
 

Lou

Full Member
Feb 16, 2011
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the French Alps
twitter.com
@SimonL I have used the tick twister you mention for years on my dog (I've removed hundreds from her) and recently on myself and it is a fantastic thing to use. The tick must be twisted out so that all of the mouth parts are removed from under the skin, if it is merely pulled at then there is a danger that those parts of the tick will be left under the skin and become infected.

I have been very aware of Lyme for a while now because here in France it is a major problem as deer range over every inch of the countryside. I have a few friends with it, one from a tick which attached itself behind her ear. I had a tick attach itself to me about a month ago - and I found another one crawling over my hand. I did a lot of research into Lyme disease at the time and it seems that the best way to protect oneself is by being aware and vigilant. When I stray off the path I now wear boots and tuck my trousers ends into my socks and always wear light coloured trousers so I can check if any ticks have landed on me. When I get into the house my trousers and socks go immediately into the (empty) bath so that the ticks have time to crawl off. And I search out for ticks on myself too.

If they have landed on you, they will then spend some time crawling towards the warmest part of your body to attach themselves to you, so it is worth paying extra attention to those areas; armpits, groin etc. (often the hardest parts to check!). They look like small spiders but are more robust and have all their legs at the front by their mouths.

I read that the tick can only infect you (if it is in fact itself infected) after it has been attached to you for 36 hours, as this is when it takes its first meal of blood from you. Before then it will have a very small flat dark black body. After it has fed the body turns light grey and will be inflated. So there is no need to panic if you find one on yourself - just remove it by twisting it out, and yes, save it in the freezer and watch the area of the bite because the 'ring' can form any time up to a month after the tick has bitten you. If you get a fever or see a red ring form around the bite site then you must go immediately to the doctors who will treat you with antibiotics.

A really amazing book about treating Lyme: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Healing-Lyme-Prevention-Borreliosis-Coinfections/dp/0970869630

I'm not sure whether mosquito repellent is also effective on ticks - I used to react very badly to mosquito and horse fly bites until I changed my diet, if you are interested the diet I now follow is called FODMAP and has been miraculous. I still get bitten by everything but I have no reaction whatsoever (compared to the dinner plate size swellings I would have before). I also drink tea made with nettles picked from the garden every day in the spring and summer and I believe this also helps (nettle is high in anti-histamines).
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,672
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McBride, BC
Thanks, Lou. That''s a really useful summary.

There's one more piece of essential equipment = a mirror, the size of your hand.
You must put one foot up on a chair and inspect your folded nether parts = crotch.

Tick mouth parts are barbed. You have to get it all.
Broken, any manipulation at all just drives the snout further into your skin.
 
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Woody girl

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 31, 2018
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Exmoor
Yes thanks lou. I learned the hard way about ticks in the "underbits" about ten years ago after an al fresco wee outside my tent at 3 am. Came home and found it attached and impossible to remove . Had to pop over to the local emergency hospital to get it gone. They gave me antibiotics straight away as it had engorged itself. I always use a loo now if possible and if camping wild... not so often nowadays .....I make sure I have something to pee in. I still cringe at the whole experience!