Issue with Zebra Billy burning food

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bikebum1975

Settler
Mar 2, 2009
664
1
45
Connecticut
Did you add any oil to the pan? That could've been your issue to. I have had a couple zsbra kettles not much an issue there. Yes I've used them on the canister stoves wood fire and an old Coleman peak one never had anything stick that bad. Rice is always a pita though
 

Wayland

Hárbarðr
The silicon sheet cut to fit really does work too. You can do a brilliant fry up in a thin pan with them, and it doesn't stick :)
Excellent when used inside the bottom of an inner billy when baking as well; bannock comes out as clean as a whistle. It also lets you make things like flat bread, oatcakes and potato scones in a plain stainless steel or aluminium pan, with no bother about them sticking or burning onto the pot.
Excellent if you want to make a 'toastie' or roasted cheese piece.

M
Is that the "rubbery" type or the thinner fibreglass reinforced type of baking sheet Mary?
 

scarfell

Forager
Oct 4, 2016
224
1
south east
Most important thing to do when cooking rice like that is to keep stirring it, not only stops it sticking and burning, but really thickens up the liquid, stir it well enough (non stop) and you'll get a lovely creamy liquid/sauce (risotto rice is best unless you are just boiling it)
 

rik_uk3

Banned
Jun 10, 2006
13,320
20
65
south wales
Learn to cook, use your pan and stove at home. You should have no real need to stir rice...you'll find out as you learn to cook.
 

Tonyuk

Settler
Nov 30, 2011
882
50
Scotland
This sort of thing, methinks. The thin oven liner sort.
This is the stuff here;

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1PC-Pastr...hash=item4b01944f95:m:mrYCemVMeiADCrp4bSoOYbw

Should be able to pick it up in poundshops cheap, but its quite thin.

Thicker sheeting can be had here;

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/WHITE-SIL...hash=item3ac837df92:m:mQdR6Y1RwNElDw26MHTCKAQ

Good for waterbottle lids etc..

Those silicone charity bands given out for free now and then are also good for wrapping round the rims of metal mugs to stop you welding your lips to them. Useful for the new aluminium crusader mug.

Tonyuk
 
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satosato

Forager
May 29, 2009
154
0
London
Zebra pot was never meant to be used to cook on fire, Zebra pot were originally made to use for transporting cooked food. People in Asia 30 40 years ago used to go to work with Zebra pots carrying lunches and dinners.
 
Sep 16, 2013
444
128
Rochester, Kent
I don't think you have too much to worry about, just keep the billy can clean (those steel scouring pads are good). Then, as has been said already, take care of what your cooking, manage the temperature (think low and slow!) and stir contents regularly.

I don't doubt that the Tatonka pots are good, but I suspect that you'll still get a similarly burnt bottom if things like rice are cooked on a high heat.
 

northumbriman

Member
Jul 15, 2010
31
0
Prudhoe
Couple of possible tips here. If you are using cookware over open fires apply a thin coating of washing up liquid to the outside of the pans before use. The outer will blacken horrendously with open fire use but this coating of washing up liquid makes it wash off really easily (obviously dont apply it inside the pans). If you need to remove burnt food from cookware you can use rhubarb. Boil it up in the pan, simmer gently dont boil it dry or you will make matters worse not better! Leave it to cool then wash out the pan. The natural acids in the rhubarb will have broken down the burnt food. Much better for the environment than expensive chemical cleaners too!
 

scarfell

Forager
Oct 4, 2016
224
1
south east
Learn to cook, use your pan and stove at home. You should have no real need to stir rice...you'll find out as you learn to cook.
Depends how you are cooking it, boiled rice doesnt need to be stirred (although it should be stirred at least a few times, it can and does still stick), but rice in something like a stew with other ingredients does, because it gets pressed at the bottom of the pan