Is Truffle hunting possible in Scotland?

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DeBrus

Member
Feb 19, 2017
36
0
Renfrew
Why ? there's a dozens of good edible fungi that do grow widely in Scotland :)
From jelly ears to oysters, from chicken of the woods to morels and penny buns, the seasons are rich :)

M

Well, dissapointing that we don't have truffles here. I agree with what you're saying though. :) I've been doing a lot of looking into some things and I've become interested in fungi just in general (Of course along with the seafood stuff as you know)
 

Kitharode

Forager
May 16, 2016
126
0
Todmorden
Hunting for truffles is possible at the north and south poles, in the middle of Australia, on the ocean floor, in fact anywhere you can get to. The hunting is easy, it's the finding that's difficult. :eek:

Fortunately for me, I dislike all mushrooms (that I've tried so far) so it's not a problem.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,264
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
You need to broaden your culinary experiences chap

I have tried it, both the white and black truffle. Several times, as some restaurants like to justify their crazy prices by adding it to food.

Maybe it is my peasant tastebuds, but I find it tastes like mould.
Headcheese, kidneys, liver, tripe, blood sausage, tongue, bring them on, but only in large portions!

Fried Pigs Ears are nice too. Add Truffles - yuck!

I did plant some bushes infected with the truffle mycelium on the last property we owned in Sussex. Was in the property brochure. Sold to the first potential buyer.

Truffles are a mythical thing!
 
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baggins

Full Member
Apr 20, 2005
1,461
209
45
Coventry (and up trees)
To find Truffles in Scotland, you firstly need to catch and train a 'truffle haggis', this is a lengthy process as they often fall into large pans of hot water and are delicious :p.
Scotland is our most successful area we visit for all manor of shrooms. Ceps, Chanterelles, all manor of Bolletes etc. On a visit last year, we even found a very rare Hydnellum that is now in the national collection at Kew.
We spend as much of our spare time north of the boarder come the mushroom season.
 

DeBrus

Member
Feb 19, 2017
36
0
Renfrew
To find Truffles in Scotland, you firstly need to catch and train a 'truffle haggis', this is a lengthy process as they often fall into large pans of hot water and are delicious :p.
Scotland is our most successful area we visit for all manor of shrooms. Ceps, Chanterelles, all manor of Bolletes etc. On a visit last year, we even found a very rare Hydnellum that is now in the national collection at Kew.
We spend as much of our spare time north of the boarder come the mushroom season.



And of course, they aren't very fast runners either with those tiny legs :lmao:

I'm actually looking to get into fungi so that I can combine them with fish once I get a start on at bushcraft. Maybe even apply for a cooking course at college and do it for a living, haha - Who knows, I still haven't decided what to do. Which areas of Scotland have you visited that had these fungi? I know that pretty much the whole of Scotland is good for it, but it would be good to go somewhere that has loads, just straight of the back.
 

Polecatsteve

Nomad
Aug 20, 2014
285
5
Scotland
Went for a walk around the woodland at the base of Ben Nevis and took these photos.
Anyone know all there names?
1)

2)

3)

4)

5)

6)

7)

8)

9)

10)

11)


These were all within a tiny quarter mile area. The woodland around Nevis is almost temperate rainforest in environment. Heavy moss everywhere and very damp.
 

Polecatsteve

Nomad
Aug 20, 2014
285
5
Scotland
Also everyone knows haggis, or Haggi for plural (say;cacti, haggi) have one set of shorter legs. The trick is to chase them around a hill with the short legs down hill so they roll away. Making it easy for capture. ...😜
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,264
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
From top:
No 1 not sure, one sort is eatable with a spicy taste, but also other looking like that are poisonous.
2: poisonous ( brown agaric in english ?)
3: if tasty - delicious. If sharp tasting - unpalatable.
4: ? You can eat the moss and roots of the fern! Moss gives you a nice voluminous stool! Also nice to use when you run out of loo paper.
5: Chantarelle in french. Ultra delicious. Fry in butter, put on toast.
6: seen it, no clue. Even if palatable, too small to bother.
7: unclear pic. If it has gills underneath - stay away. If it has the small velvety tubes - taste. If bitter do not eat.
8: looks like an okder No 2?
9:Red Agaric in English? Good traditional stuff, the poison makes you into a Viking Berserk before your liver gives up and you die.
10: dried it makes a good fire starter or tinder and to transport glowing embers? I use lighters and matches, I am not really a bushcrafter.

My advice? DO NOT TOUCH ANY FUNGHI EXCEPT THE ONES YOU BUY AT WAITROSE/ LIDL / SAINSBURYS!
Do a course first!
 
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