How many eggs...

Tomteifi

Nomad
Jan 22, 2016
294
16
Carmarthenshire, South Wales
If you've never tried Chinese omelette you haven't lived. Mr google will tell you how if you don't know-truly ambrosia food!!! They don't have to be fancy recipe ones either, just plain mixed up eggs with salt pepper and dash of soy! Like pancakes, once I start cooking them I don't stop til its all gone.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,390
880
63
Florida
If you've never tried Chinese omelette you haven't lived. Mr google will tell you how if you don't know-truly ambrosia food!!! They don't have to be fancy recipe ones either, just plain mixed up eggs with salt pepper and dash of soy! Like pancakes, once I start cooking them I don't stop til its all gone.
Are you referirng to Fu Yung? You're making me hungry.
 

Tomteifi

Nomad
Jan 22, 2016
294
16
Carmarthenshire, South Wales
Traditional Chinese omelettes as taught to me by a professional Chinese chef in the sixties is a very thin omelette in a similar manner as you would make pancakes. Just keep the amount going into the pan of whatever egg mixture you have prepared down to an absolute minimum and spread it thinly around the pre oiled pan before cooking. Ideally you want them about an eigth of an inch thick or thinner. In that way the omelette cooks and comes out very thin and delicate and oh so tasty. Each omelette only takes a matter of seconds to cook. I would normally cook 8 to 10 at a time for a snack meal. Foo Yung is a much thicker omelette usually containing meat and vegetables and takes somewhat longer to cook. Hope that helps. Yes foo yung is lovely too.
 
  • Like
Reactions: santaman2000

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,390
880
63
Florida
Apparently it's now safe again to eat runny eggs; so long as they have the Lion Mark upon them :)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/health-41571327/runny-eggs-declared-safe-to-eat
That's good news for y'all. Sorta (it obviously only applies to store bought eggs :( ) I never stopped (not quite elderly by definition yet but diabetes places me in a low immune system status) We have pasturized eggs available here that are safe to eat completely raw but I've never bothered with them. I also still eat raw oysters.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,488
1,607
S. Lanarkshire
Tbh I think it was pretty safe for most folks anyway, but this kind of 'ruling' is a pretty clear thumbs up for the health of the flocks and their produce.

On the whole I think Brits buy eggs as eggs. I know one of the Americans posted a link a while back to a jug of eggs, and separated egg whites too, but those are not common things here. ....thinking on it, I don't think I have ever seen a jug of pasturised eggs here, nor a carton of just egg whites. We can buy dried eggs, and dried egg whites as baking products, but eggs are usually 'eggs', iimmc.

Do you get pickled eggs ?

M
 

Stew

Bushcrafter through and through
Nov 29, 2003
5,314
381
Aylesbury
stewartjlight-knives.com
Tbh I think it was pretty safe for most folks anyway, but this kind of 'ruling' is a pretty clear thumbs up for the health of the flocks and their produce.

On the whole I think Brits buy eggs as eggs. I know one of the Americans posted a link a while back to a jug of eggs, and separated egg whites too, but those are not common things here. ....thinking on it, I don't think I have ever seen a jug of pasturised eggs here, nor a carton of just egg whites. We can buy dried eggs, and dried egg whites as baking products, but eggs are usually 'eggs', iimmc.

Do you get pickled eggs ?

M
When I worked in a hotel, they used to have the eggs for scrambling delivered pre-shelled in tetrapack type cartons.
 

Stew

Bushcrafter through and through
Nov 29, 2003
5,314
381
Aylesbury
stewartjlight-knives.com
Tbh I think it was pretty safe for most folks anyway, but this kind of 'ruling' is a pretty clear thumbs up for the health of the flocks and their produce.

On the whole I think Brits buy eggs as eggs. I know one of the Americans posted a link a while back to a jug of eggs, and separated egg whites too, but those are not common things here. ....thinking on it, I don't think I have ever seen a jug of pasturised eggs here, nor a carton of just egg whites. We can buy dried eggs, and dried egg whites as baking products, but eggs are usually 'eggs', iimmc.

Do you get pickled eggs ?

M
And also, dried eggs - is that still a thing here for baking use? I seem to recall some years back the big supermarkets stopping selling dried egg so stuff labelled up for baking stopped. I may have misremembered or got it wrong. I haven't looked in years!
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,488
1,607
S. Lanarkshire
When I worked in a hotel, they used to have the eggs for scrambling delivered pre-shelled in tetrapack type cartons.
So, kind of 'catering' eggs ? Makes sense I suppose if they're used in bulk. Not the kind of thing stocked in the usual chilled cabinets though.

I can buy dried eggs, and dried egg whites, they're used in some cake and icing type recipes, and now they seem to be popular with the folks who drink 'protein shakes'. Not easily found in the supermarkets right enough, but from on-line suppliers like Amazon.co.uk

M
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,390
880
63
Florida
Tbh I think it was pretty safe for most folks anyway, but this kind of 'ruling' is a pretty clear thumbs up for the health of the flocks and their produce.

On the whole I think Brits buy eggs as eggs. I know one of the Americans posted a link a while back to a jug of eggs, and separated egg whites too, but those are not common things here. ....thinking on it, I don't think I have ever seen a jug of pasturised eggs here, nor a carton of just egg whites. We can buy dried eggs, and dried egg whites as baking products, but eggs are usually 'eggs', iimmc.

Do you get pickled eggs ?

M
When I mentioned pasteurized eggs i was referring to whole eggs pasteurized in the shell. I didn't know any other kind existed until researching it after reading your post. I guess I just never really thought about it. During that same research session I also learned that in Europe commercial laying hens are required to be vaccinated against salmonellosis,.but it didn't specify if this included the UK.


As Stew said the restaurants sometimes use the big volume (gallon size) containers of pre-scrambled eggs you mentioned. The type egg product you'd find in an ordinary home would be a much smaller container of "Egg Beaters" or some other brand name for the same product. They're aimed at health conscious people who still believe egg yolks are bad for your health. They're generally higher priced than regular eggs and while they do have enough following to warrant continued production and sales, they never really took off like planned.

To summarize that last paragraph, most Americans also buy eggs as eggs. The other products or a niche market.

Yes, we have pickled eggs. We even get some British ones on the international aisle of the grocery stores. The U.S. ones (whether store bought or home made) often come in either quart or half gallon jars with a beet or two in the jar to color and flavor a bit as well as a few chilis, or onion slices, or peppercorns, or garlic cloves (or some combination) to spice.



 
Last edited:

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,488
1,607
S. Lanarkshire
Oh I like the look of those :D I'll pinch that idea, thank you :)

Kev (Beachlover) asked elsewhere about recipes for pickled eggs, and though I spice them up when I made them in the past, I hadn't thought about adding beetroot to colour them :D I did make curried ones with turmeric that ended up banded yellow and white though.

M
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,390
880
63
Florida
I like the idea of curried ones! Let me know if you perfect it please!

I apologize for editing the last post after you've replied. That said, I'm not changing the content, just rearranging the paragraphs to correct an earlier edit so it makes sense.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,488
1,607
S. Lanarkshire
It's a by guess and 'that looks about right' sort of recipe :)
I just added some ground ginger, chilli powder, turmeric and some curry powder (korma if I recall correctly) to the pickling spice mix. The turmeric stained the egg white outsides very yellow, the inner stayed whiter and then there was the yellow yoke inside of that. Bit like a bullseye sweetie.
I was trying to overcome the inherant boiled eggyness of the pickled eggs, give them a bit of a kick.
 
  • Like
Reactions: santaman2000

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,488
1,607
S. Lanarkshire
Where ? I've looked since someone mentioned it last time, and I haven't seen them. I thought it would be a great idea to pack for Himself when he goes camping.
Local supermarkets are Sainsbury's, Asda, Tesco, Morrison's, Lidl and the Co. and none of them had them.
In the end I just cracked half a dozen into a sealable beaker and put them into the cooler box.

M
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nice65

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,390
880
63
Florida
Santaman - do you have a link to the EU rules on vaccination of commercial laying flocks?
No. Not the regs themselves Sorry, it was just a paragraph from the wiki article regarding pasteurized eggs. Here's the link to the wiki article enwikipedia.org/wiki/Pateurized_eggs and here's the relevant paragraph:

Salmonellosis
The primary risk associated with eggs is food-borne illness caused by Salmonella enteritidis bacteria. Salmonella enteritidis is a dangerous bacterium that can be transferred to humans through ingestion of raw or undercooked eggs.[3] Nearly 4 out of 5 Salmonella-related foodborne illness cases share a common vehicle: raw or undercooked shell eggs.[3]

Salmonellosis, the illness that a Salmonella infection causes, is characterized by nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, fever, and headache. The onset of its symptoms begins between 6 hours and 72 hours after the consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria.[4] As few as 15 bacterial cells can cause food-borne illness.[2]

While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate there are 1 million cases of salmonellosis per year in the US leading to 19,000 hospitalizations and 380 deaths [5], the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) estimates that only 79,000 cases each year are the result of consuming eggs contaminated with Salmonella, of which only 30 result in death.[6]

In Europe all hens are required to be vaccinated against salmonellosis and eggs are not washed or refrigerated since condensation could lead to salmonellosis contamination[7]. In the US it is important to keep eggs refrigerated since not all hens are vaccinated.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,390
880
63
Florida
Where ? I've looked since someone mentioned it last time, and I haven't seen them. I thought it would be a great idea to pack for Himself when he goes camping.
Local supermarkets are Sainsbury's, Asda, Tesco, Morrison's, Lidl and the Co. and none of them had them.
In the end I just cracked half a dozen into a sealable beaker and put them into the cooler box.

M
Over here they're the real eggs at one end of the dairy case. They (the ones for home use) usually look something like this (about a pint sized) with egg whites colored to look like whole eggs:



Or less often a quart sized and plain egg whites only




Brand names and logos may vary in either size. They also have assorted flavors now (pre added omelet flavors or herbs) You might just ask the supermarket manager? (or the dairy department sub manager)