Hot sauce

  • Hey Guest, For sale we have Hultafors Outdoor Knives with Firesteel PLEASE LOOK HERE for more information or use the Pay Now button in the sidebar

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,266
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Santamans way to eat trout is with hot sausce. Which gave me the idea for this thread.

Do you like hot sauce, do you buy it, which one?
Or do you make your own?

I used to love Tabasco, but since I moved to the Caribbean I have discovered the Caribbean, mainly Jamaican hot sauces.
Heat from mild to fiery, but lots and lots of flavour!


I also make my own, a local old receipe:
You take hot peppers, usually red, yellow and green Scotch Bonnett, remove the stalk, slice in 2mm sliced across.
Pack tightly in a jar with screw lock, pour Vinegar or Apple Cider Vinegar ( or a mix of both) leave in room temperature for a week. Turn jar once a day to distribute the juices.
Ready to use the liquid in about 2 weeks, best if stored in fridge once you start using it. Gets hotter as it ages.

The marinated slices are nice on hard boiled eggs.

I have usually one jar we eat and one maturing.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,730
1,690
McBride, BC
For the sake of predictable quality for visitors, I stick with McIlhenny Tabasco.
The Jalapeno is the easiest to use with little risk. I can't find a use for the Chipotle.
The "Original" can go hot in a drop or two in small dishes.

For company, I'll make corn meal muffins, a la McIlhenny, with jalapeno for breakfast.
They can't figure out where the "zip" is coming from.
Easier still is a pan, finished in the oven and cut up.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,775
1,020
64
Florida
I still find Tobasco Original to be extremely good although I also like their Habanero, and Chipotle flavors. Other good brands are Loiusiana, Texas Pete, and Red Devil.

I have thought about making my own but I just don't have the patience to properly age it for 2 years as McIlhenny does with their Tobasco.
 

Bhod

Forager
Feb 2, 2007
128
0
55
North Tyneside
Encona or Dunns River West Indian hot pepper sauce, or Nandos Extra extra hot, Heinz did a really nice one a while back although I haven't been able to find it since, Chipotle and Garlic, not mega hot but flavoursome.
 

Uilleachan

Full Member
Aug 14, 2013
585
5
Northwest Scotland
I've tried loads of hot sauces, but always find my self returning to good old Tobasco. I now buy it in the larger 350ml bottles as doing it that way I've always got it in, and I save a load of money.

As a mexicanesque alternative to mustard, I blend a few chillies with some olive (mexicans use corn oil) oil and a tiny pinch of salt, and use it instead of mustard.
 
admittedly I'm not a friend of too spicy food--a little bit yes, but not too much, please! otherwise I taste only "" spicy"" and could be eating cardboard or steak without being able to tell the difference :yikes: .... plus "" spicy"" makes my trunk ..... eerrrhhh...... nose running --and here in Korea you're not doing that on the table but outside which means I've to get up and out all the time (for those not aware of it: in Korea chillie/ chillie sauce comes with food.....)


but Tabasco sauce is great for cleaning copper:rolleyes:
 
Last edited:

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,775
1,020
64
Florida
The Louisiana sauces are aged and fermented. The Caribbean ones are "fresh" preparations.

Another, thicker, hot sauce madearound here is to puree hot peppers, mix with a little bit of vinegar and maybe some sugar.
Liquid fire!

Like Uilleachan says a little further on, pureed with a little oil is nice too.

I've tried loads of hot sauces, but always find my self returning to good old Tobasco. I now buy it in the larger 350ml bottles as doing it that way I've always got it in, and I save a load of money.

As a mexicanesque alternative to mustard, I blend a few chillies with some olive (mexicans use corn oil) oil and a tiny pinch of salt, and use it instead of mustard.

350 ml isn't really that much there are 6 of us in the household (me, Barbara, and the kids/grandkids) but only 3 of us eat hot sauce, and just the 3 of us go through that much in a week or so. However, Tobasco to the rescue with 1 US gallon (3.8 liters) size bottles (available on Amazon for $46 = 31.97 pounds)


81Gk4QxgATL._SY679_.jpg



admittedly I'm not a friend of too spicy food--a little bit yes, but not too much, please! otherwise I taste only "" spicy"" and could be eating cardboard or steak without being able to tell the difference :yikes: .... plus "" spicy"" makes my trunk ..... eerrrhhh...... nose running --and here in Korea you're not doing that on the table but outside which means I've to get up and out all the time (for those not aware of it: in Korea chillie/ chillie sauce comes with food.....)


but Tabasco sauce is great for cleaning copper:rolleyes:

Spicy makes my nose run as well. That's actually one of the health benefits (clearing stopped sinuses)
 
Last edited:

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,775
1,020
64
Florida
I just use a funnel to refill the smaller table bottles from the above gallon sized ones (though often a different brand) However another accessory from Amazon to go with the above big bottle ($5.45 = 3.79 pounds)

31JY7HmBsxL._SX425_.jpg
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,775
1,020
64
Florida
Janne, I re-read your OP and saw where you like the like to use the marinated slices of peppers on hard boiled eggs. You should try pickling those eggs with a few peppers in the jar. We pickle loads of things that way for a hot pickle: pickled eggs, pickled cucumbers, pickled okra, etc.
 

woodstock

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 7, 2007
3,568
65
64
off grid somewhere else
My favourite condiment at the moment not a sauce but a chutney Naga pickle it is almost off scoville scale the sauce of choice is cajun hot sauce,and then Encona hot pepper.
 

bigbear

Full Member
May 1, 2008
901
92
Yorkshire
For those who like a sweet chilli sauce, so heat bit gently done, Linghams garlic chilli is the pick of those I have tried, good in cooking, as a dipping sauce, or mixed with mayo for going on toast in fish soup, which is what We have just eaten.
Not hot, but one for those non real men like me who just cannot cope with the heat of the real stuff.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,775
1,020
64
Florida
Do you add the peppers to the standard pickling liquid?
It does sound interesting.
I love pickled Okra. Okra is unknown in Europe, except in " ethnic" shops. I never saw it though.

You can add it to the pickling brine as you cook it (if you don't strain it out before pouring it in the jars) or you can just put them in the jars before you pour the brine in (either at the top or bottom of the jar) Word of advise = start light with the peppers.

For clarification, when I said "we pickle loads of things" I meant we in the US, not me personally. I have pickled eggs once or twice but mostly I buy them. I especially like the jalepeno pickled eggs, okra, etc.
 
Last edited:

Uilleachan

Full Member
Aug 14, 2013
585
5
Northwest Scotland
Like Uilleachan says a little further on, pureed with a little oil is nice too.



350 ml isn't really that much there are 6 of us in the household (me, Barbara, and the kids/grandkids) but only 3 of us eat hot sauce, and just the 3 of us go through that much in a week or so. However, Tobasco to the rescue with 1 US gallon (3.8 liters) size bottles (available on Amazon for $46 = 31.97 pounds)


81Gk4QxgATL._SY679_.jpg





Spicy makes my nose run as well. That's actually one of the health benefits (clearing stopped sinuses)

A US gallon :) Now thats bulk!
 

Hultafors Outdoor knife for Sale

We have a a number of Hultafors Outdoor Knives with Firesteels for sale.

You can see more details here in this thread OUTDOOR KNIVES The price is £27 posted to the UK. Pay via the paypal button below.